Bob Weir And Wolf Bros Welcome Kenny Brooks, Debut Songs At Intimate Blue Note Shows [Full Pro-Shot Video]

first_imgOn Monday, Bob Weir and Wolf Bros played a pair of last-minute shows at New York City’s intimate Blue Note Jazz Club, utilizing a few days off in the band’s touring schedule. Weir, Don Was, and Jay Lane announced the surprise shows on Sunday afternoon, giving fans a chance to enter a lottery system with a short window of time. Grateful Dead fans spotted bassist Phil Lesh and his son Grahame (Lesh) in the 200-capacity club, which was full of a very attentive group of attendees due in part to Blue Note’s no cell phone policy.Bob Weir and Wolf Bros opened up their first set with “Dark Star”, ultimately weaving in and out of the tune for the entirety of their early set. The trio then invited up longtime Weir collaborator and RatDog saxophonist Kenny Brooks for a jam on John Coltrane‘s “A Love Supreme” before continuing to weave in and out of “Dark Star”, throwing covers of Little Willie John’s “Fever” and Little Feat’s “Easy To Slip” in the mix.Transitioning back into their three-piece configuration, Wolf Bros dove back into “Dark Star”, which was followed up by “Playing In The Band”, a “Supplication” jam, and a take on Bob Dylan‘s “When I Paint My Masterpiece”. Bob Weir and Wolf Bros invited Kenny Brooks back up for the remainder of their early show as they transitioned back into “Supplication” terriory before finally closing out “Dark Star” and reprising “Playing In The Band” to bring the 75-minute set to a close. The four-piece delivered a lone encore with “Ripple” to send their early show crowd packing.Following a break, Weir, Lane, and Was reemerged to open their late show with “Eternity”, a Weir and Rob Wasserman collaboration that had not been in Weir’s live repertoire for more than a decade until he dusted it off on Wolf Bros inaugural tour in 2018. Kenny Brooks joined the band for an improvisational take on “Bird Song”, before the band hopped back into their three-piece format as they moved forward with Bob Dylan’s “Most Of The Time”, “New Speedway Boogie”, and the Bob Weir and Wolf Bros debut of “Morning Dew”. Brooks reemerged to help the band close out their late show with “Not Fade Away”. Weir, Lane, and Was were still basking  in the energy of their set-closer as the trio took the stage to open up their encore with a reprise of “Not Fade Away”, which was followed up by another Wolf Bros debut, “Oh Boy!”, a song made popular by Buddy Holly in the late 1950s.Watch pro-shot video of both of Bob Weir and Wolf Bros’ Blue Note Jazz Club sets below via Nugs.tv:Bob Weir and Wolf Bros – 3/11/2019 [Pro-Shot Video][Video: nugsnet]Bob Weir and Wolf Bros are currently in the midst of their 20-date late-winter tour that spans through March 30th. Next up for the trio is a two-night run at Red Bank, NJ’s Count Basie Theatre on Wednesday and Thursday, March 13th and 14th.For a full list of the band’s upcoming tour dates and ticketing information, head to Bob Weir’s website.Setlist: Bob Weir and Wolf Bros | Blue Note Jazz Club | New York, NY | 3/11/2019Early Set: Dark Star v1 > A Love Supreme Jam* > Dark Star* > Fever* > Dark Star* > Easy To Slip* > Dark Star, Playing In The Band > Supplication Jam > When I Paint My Masterpiece > Supplication Jam* > Dark Star v2* > Playing In The Band Reprise*Encore: Ripple** – w/ Kenny BrooksLate Set: Eternity > Bird Song*, Most Of The Time, New Speedway Boogie > Morning Dew > Not Fade Away*Encore: Not Fade Away Reprise > Oh Boy!* – w/ Kenny Brookslast_img read more

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London Aladdin Star Trevor Dion Nicholas on Standbys, Friendship & Loving London

first_img View Comments The Disney musical Aladdin has hopped a magic carpet to London for what looks set to be a long run at the Prince Edward Theatre in a West End premiere that has made a star out of American performer Trevor Dion Nicholas as the Genie. An alum of the ongoing Broadway production, where he was the standby for three roles (Genie included), Nicholas was clearly relishing his much-deserved moment in the spotlight when Broadway.com caught up with him one recent afternoon. You’ve been part of Aladdin for 18 months now, but how did you first get connected to the show?I remember watching the “Friend Like Me” performance on the Tonys [in 2014] and thinking, “that looks like something I could possibly do—that could be in my wheelhouse.” Skipping ahead, I ended up later that same year getting an audition and the next week I was flying down to Florida to start rehearsals for The Wiz and flash forward to one day early in 2015 when I was asked to fly up to New York on a Monday to talk about the part and before I’d gotten on the flight, I had the gig: I replaced Michael James Scott when he went to do Something Rotten.But to cover multiple roles is different to opening in a starring part from scratch in London.Tell me about it!  I guess it was June or July of 2015 when I got a call from Disney asking whether I would consider going to London, and I just burst into tears. As a standby or understudy, you can feel overlooked or undervalued and here I was getting to open the show in the West End! My heart was more than full—it was overflowing. The interesting thing with Aladdin in Britain is how well-known the title is here from the traditional Christmas pantomime or panto.That’s right, which we don’t have in the States. I think it’s fantastic that tradition exists [here] and I’m delighted that we can give audiences something different—something that isn’t just the classic familiar panto. Your experience must make you especially sympathetic to your own standbys.Absolutely because I’ve lived that life and I know the difficulty of it. I actually have two standbys here, and both have got to go on, and I’ve enjoyed watching them enjoy their moment; I know what it feels like. Now that the Genie is yours, what do you particularly like about him?The joy of the Genie for me is the undying friendship and companionship that he is there to provide. Also, I mean, who wouldn’t want to appear on the stage swathed in Swarovski crystals—not to mention that I must have one of the best entrances: I love the way he’s revealed right at the top of the show! How does it feel to play with and feed off the audience?That’s so much fun! What’s great is that he exists both in and out of the story, so it’s as if the show for the Genie is just this large sandbox. Casey [Nicholaw, the director] has been so supportive of allowing me to make [the part] my own and for me to find my own legs. The honesty of the cast’s personalities is allowed to come through, which helps a show that’s so crazy and fun at the same time to have a sense of reality.I saw you online sharing a pretty terrific duet here with your Broadway Genie [Tony winner James Monroe Iglehart]. You know, that’s the first time we’d ever done that, and it was great that it was caught by the folks at Disney, who jumped at the opportunity of James being in London for us to have a go together at “Somebody’s Got Your Back.”Did you and James click from the get-go?Really, really fast because we’re both man-children! I’ve missed him a ton since coming to London, so it was wonderful having him here with his wife and family. Sometimes I think the two of us should do another revival of Side Show. If they ever feel like gender-flipping those parts, we’re in! Opening night here must have been unlike anything else.Oh my God, it was insane! My parents were in the audience and my family and friends, and I remember just finishing “Friend Like Me” and screaming “yes!” like this sudden affirmation. It was like, I’m here, it’s real, I did it, and it just felt like this amazing joint success. It was so exciting!How well did you know the film?I was obsessed with it, especially Jafar. I thought he was a fascinating villain and just so slick. What’s fun is that I have two young children and now they love the film: the oldest is two years younger than I was when I first came across the movie at age 10. It’s one of those animated features that transcends generations. Where do you see this experience taking you?I’m really keeping things open right now. It’s been a struggle at times and a fight to get to this place. Right now, I feel precisely where I want to be; so for me, it’s about just enjoying this definite sense of happiness. This is the first time in my career where I have really experienced something where I think, “OK, I can enjoy what I’m doing for now. This can be the center of my universe without always needing to look forward.” What are you loving about London?The food!  people warned me about the food, when in fact, it has been absolutely incredible. And I am really tickled, too, by the adoration [the British] have for the theater, which I think is vanishing more and more in the U.S. But it genuinely exists here, which is lovely to experience onstage and off.  Trevor Dion Nicholas in ‘Aladdin'(Photo: Deen van Meer © Disney)last_img read more

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Wheat Rust

first_imgWheat rust is detrimental to a crop because of its ability to spread and mutate. The disease becomes airborne and is carried from western states to eastern states. The disease can change the race of the species, which can cause varieties to lose their susceptibility. Fungicide timing is critical. Rust’s impact can be felt from 5 percent infection to 50 percent infection in just three days’ time. If the disease reaches the flag leaf, a 20 percent yield loss can occur.For more information or questions about wheat rust, contact Sawyer at the Thomas County Extension office at caes.uga.edu/extension/thomas/contact.html. Farmers are also advised to plant several resistant cultivars to reduce the risk of the disease’s severity. Wheat rust, which can be diagnosed by the small pustules about one-sixteenth inch in diameter with flaky red spores, causes a loss of $5 billion each year. The disease typically grows when temperatures are between 60 and 80 degrees. Unlike other diseases that overwinter in crop debris, rust has to be reintroduced each year.Though unpreventable, wheat rust can be managed with a fungicide. Ideally, the fungicide should be sprayed on the wheat before the disease arrives, according to Sawyer, which is why communication that the disease is present is very important.“Specialists and people talk across the state line,” Sawyer said. “When something is in Louisiana we know it’s there. When something moves through Florida, we know. But the real way you manage is to scout your fields — especially when you know the rust is getting close,” Sawyer said.center_img Sawyer added that even if a grower sprayed his field, it is still likely that he would find some infected plants by the time he harvests his crop. However, it is vital that the crop is sprayed before the disease gets to the flag leaf (the last leaf of the wheat plant). The flag leaf supplies phtotosynthate to the grain, which is vital to grain development.“On wheat, the flag leaf is a leaf that sits right under the head,” Sawyer said. “If rust gets on that leaf, the damage is much more significant.” University of Georgia Extension agents are often at the front lines when it comes to finding and defending crops from diseases and pests. Andrew Sawyer, an Extension agricultural and natural resources agent in Thomas County, made a timely discovery when he was the first to identify the presence of wheat rust in Georgia in 2013. His finding reduced yield losses on wheat, barley and rye.“I was scouting to learn for my benefit, and I ended up finding the rust. I took it to the office on a Friday, put it on my microscope and sent it to Dr. (Alfredo) Martinez in Griffin on a Monday, and he said, ‘Yep that’s it,’” Sawyer said.In an effort to learn more about wheat, Sawyer scouted two wheat fields on a weekly basis in Thomas County, which led to his discovery.last_img read more

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Nutsedge Control

first_imgA Georgia scientist is using peanut harvesting equipment to organically control weeds — particularly nutsedge.Carroll Johnson, a U.S. Department of Agriculture scientist working on the University of Georgia Tifton Campus, is studying weed control in organic farming. Nutsedge, which can be prevalent in any field, with any crop, adapts to different growing conditions and thrives on intense sunlight. It is most prevalent in fields with a lot of spacing between rows or between plants in rows like tomato and pepper fields.“Where I’ve seen it, other weed species are pretty well suppressed or pretty much under control, but nutsedge fills the void. It also fills the void where crop growth is sparse,” said Johnson.Conventional farmers can apply herbicides to eliminate or suppress weeds. Organic farmers have limited choices of herbicides and those allowed for use are ineffective at controlling nutsedge. The weeds end up competing with organic crops for water, nutrients and sunlight. Many conventional farmers use mulch to suppress nutsedge and other weeds. Mulches can be used in organic farming but are not encouraged, says Johnson. With nutsedge popping up everywhere, hand-weeding is an unsustainable practice. “Sustainable means a lot of things to a lot of different people, but for me, in this context of the business sense, that much hand labor is not sustainable,” Johnson said.To better manage nutsedge, Johnson is evaluating the use of a peanut digger to control the weed. Peanut diggers are used to dig inches below ground and uproot peanuts for harvest. Johnson believes the same use could be applied for nutsedge control. Nutsedge produces tubers under ground, which can lead to other nutsedge plants.“The key to controlling nutsedge long term is getting the populations at a manageable level by eliminating tuber productions,” he said.His original plan was to use a peanut digger to uproot the weeds and drop them back in the field, hoping the heat of the sun would kill them. That didn’t happen last year. Heavy rains in Georgia allowed the weeds to re-root.Johnson relied on the expertise of UGA College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences’ weed scientists Stanley Culpepper, Eric Prostko, Ted Webster and Timothy Grey who research weed control in conventional crop production.He also enlisted the help of senior mechanical engineering students from Auburn University. As part of a class project, the students formulated an idea of attaching a cart to the peanut digger, so the digger removes the nutsedge from the ground and drops it into a cart that is dumped into the woods or some other area to prevent the weeds from regrowing in the field. Johnson estimates the peanut digger method controls 60 percent of nutsedge in a field. The peanut digger with the cart is 80-85 percent effective, but Johnson hopes to reach at least 90 percent effectivenesss.“At 90 percent, it gets organic growers to a point where they can deal with this weed with the everyday resources they’ve got,” Johnson said.The Auburn students were in Tifton on July 28 to help merge the cart and peanut digger. They saw their class project in action as Johnson and UGA technician Daniel Evarts demonstrated the research.“We’ve had the idea for several years, just using the peanut digger itself,” Johnson said. “The cart allows us to carry this area of study to another level.”After uprooting the weeds, Johnson will see how much nutsedge returns next year. He needs to determine whether the practice is effective, if multiple passes through the field are required and then pinpoint the best time to use the digger to uproot nutsedge.“(Organic farming’s) gotten a lot of interest. In terms of acres, it’s small but it’s an area in other parts of the country that’s much bigger. There’s a lot of interest in it on the consumer side, and growers are curious, so they can capitalize on a niche market,” Johnson said. “This is a legitimate agricultural enterprise.”last_img read more

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AC Energy Plans to Sell Coal Plants in Philippines, Boost Renewables Investments

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Reuters:MANILA—AC Energy Inc, part of Philippine conglomerate Ayala Corp, on Monday said it could sell a stake of up to 50 percent in its coal-fired energy unit, using funds from the deal to boost its renewables business in Southeast Asia.AC Energy is in talks with potential partners that could be interested in taking a stake in its wholly-owned AC Thermal unit, company officials said, although they declined to identify would-be investors or give any indications on price.“We cannot go on record with respect to valuation,” AC Energy President and CEO Eric Francia said in an email to Reuters on Monday, declining to comment on local newspaper reports saying the sale may raise up to $1 billion.AC Energy’s assets are 80 percent thermal and 20 percent renewable, with a total value of 135 billion pesos ($2.6 billion), according to a recent CLSA report. Its thermal assets include the 632 megawatt GNPower Mariveles coal plant, a partnership with Aboitiz Power Corp’s subsidiary Therma Power and Power Partners, and the 552 MW GNPower Kauswagan, in which it has an 85 percent economic stake.The company expects to expand its overall energy capacity to more than 5,000 megawatts by 2025 from 1,600 MW currently. Following its acquisition of Salak and Darajat geothermal assets in Indonesia in 2017, AC Energy is assembling a portfolio of renewable energy assets in the region this year, including a 75 MW wind project in Indonesia and over 300 MW of solar projects in Vietnam.More: Philippines’ Ayala Looks To Sell Big Stake In Coal Unit, Turn To Renewables AC Energy Plans to Sell Coal Plants in Philippines, Boost Renewables Investmentslast_img read more

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Colombian President Angered As Rebels Kidnap Two

first_imgBy Dialogo February 14, 2011 What the president, Mr. Santos, says is something that is very true, during the more than 50 years that FARC has been rebelling, they have used all of the Colombians, and they are doing it now more than ever, it is not fair that they pretend to deliver kidnapped people and on the other hand kidnap more people, but the real problem resides with those politicians that look to stand out without caring about they have to do to accomplish their mission, as is the case of ex Senator Piedad Cordoba, a woman without scruples, someone who has always been concerned about the state FARC finds itself and not to what happens to Colombians, remember how this woman effusively greeted the terrorists on the day the town was liberated, and what is sadder is that many Colombians see her as the next Mother Theresa of Calcutta, how sad… Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos lashed out at leftist FARC guerrillas on 10 February over the abduction of two factory workers, a day after the rebels freed the first of five hostages they promised to release. Santos said that he was tempted to cancel an order to stop military operations in southern Colombia, a condition guerrillas with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) say is necessary to release their hostages. “It is totally unacceptable that the FARC on one hand is releasing hostages as an act of generosity, and on the other is kidnapping more people,” he said. The day before, FARC freed Marcos Baquero, 33, the first of five hostages to be released by the guerrillas. But the night before they allegedly abducted two workers from a cardboard factory in the El Tambo area of the southern department of Cauca. “We demand the freedom of all those kidnapped and reject this double standard,” Santos said. The guerrillas released Baquero, a local councilman, to intermediaries in an elaborate operation in the central Meta department. He was flown to Villavicencio, 95 kilometers south of Bogota, aboard a Brazilian air force helicopter with Red Cross markings. FARC rebels have pledged to release a Colombian marine and another municipal council member on Friday near the town of Florencia in southeastern Colombia, and a police major and a soldier on Sunday in Ibaque in the center of the country. Despite his anger, Santos said he would not thwart the upcoming release operations. “I do not want to frustrate the hope that the families have,” Santos said. “But I do want to say that this two-timing, this dual morality, is totally unacceptable.” Santos spoke as a team of intermediaries that include former senator Piedad Cordoba and two delegates from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) met in Florencia to prepare for the scheduled Friday release. FARC, which has been at war with the Colombian government since 1964, has between 7,000 and 11,000 fighters and is holding at least 19 soldiers and police officers hostage. The rebels have long demanded a hostage-for-prisoner swap, something both Santos and his predecessor, Alvaro Uribe, have refused to consider.last_img read more

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Using Facebook marketing to reach and engage credit union members

first_imgIt’s important for Credit Unions to seek out new and better ways to engage with members, especially now that fewer and fewer people are visiting branches in person.Facebook is a great place to reach out to your members on a daily basis on a platform they already use. These interactions help build relationships and trust with members, and to remain top of mind as they go about their daily lives, which is essential to better grow your CU’s share of a member’s wallet.Here is how you can use Facebook marketing to reach and engage credit union members… continue reading » 10SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

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Defense Department agency suffers data breach: report

first_imgA Defense Department agency reportedly suffered a data breach last year that may have compromised personal information, including Social Security numbers, of victims involved.Reuters reported Thursday that the Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) sent out a letter last week to all individuals affected by the breach, which DISA wrote took place between May and July of 2019.DISA told victims in the letter, which was also tweeted out by one of the potential victims earlier this week, that “some of your personal information, including your Social Security number, may have been compromised” due to a data breach of DISA’s systems. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

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Diversity & Inclusion: It’s about culture, leadership, and making your business better

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Alison Carr Alison currently serves as Chief Strategy Officer for Your Credit Union Partner. In this capacity she supports: Community Development & Outreach Initiatives, Business Development, Speaking/Training Engagements, Strategic Partnerships and … Web: www.yourcupartner.org Details Fostering true diversity and inclusion is about finding out what people are all about and celebrating their differences. The importance of D & I really drills down to the concept that, when you look at things from someone else’s point of view – listening and understanding where they are coming from – you allow yourself to be open to new and different ideas and ways of thinking.So, what does it mean to build a culture around inclusion?We really can’t talk about inclusion without first addressing our own biases. We all have them and so do our organizations. Now admittedly I am not an expert in this area as it relates to peeling back the layers as it relates to bias. Implicit or unconscious bias are the unintended, subtle and unconscious thoughts that happen to most of us, most of the time. These include the attitudes and stereotypes we develop based on characteristics such as race, age, ethnicity, weight, gender, ability, cultural values, or appearance.By learning to recognize our own unconscious bias, we can begin to reprogram our mindset. Our brains are wired to make assumptions – it requires a conscious effort to disrupt our biases. We are human, after all – and, it is an ongoing process.By fostering an inclusive culture, we begin to breakdown these biases. Too often we hear about organizations that look to increased diversity as the answer, by hiring diverse talent, without ensuring there is a culture of support and inclusion in place.  This sets organizations up for failure in this critical area.How do we become more “inclusive” leaders? The following are what Deloitte describes as the “6 Traits of Inclusive Leaders.”Cognizance of Bias:  Bias is a leaders Achilles heel. It is important to be aware of unconscious bias so our decisions can be made in a transparent, consistent and informed manner.Curiosity:  Understanding that different ideas and experiences enable growth. We need to listen to learn, and thus listen attentively and value the viewpoints of othersCourage: Talking about imperfections involves personal risk-taking. Fear of change is a big destabilizer of DEI efforts. By leading by example and engaging in respectful, but tough conversations when necessary, we model the desired behavior. This also includes identifying opportunities to be more inclusive, take ownership and engage others. Cultural Intelligence: Not every employee sees the world through the same cultural lens. Seek out opportunities to experience and learn about different cultures and be aware of other cultural contexts.Collaboration: Create teams that are diverse in thinking. Commitment:  Treat everyone with fairness and respect and foster an environment where every team member can be themselves. We do this by modeling authenticity and empowering each other’s well-being.Truly fostering inclusion requires active, intentional, and ongoing efforts to promote full participation and a sense of belonging. It involves policies and practices, but also the ability to envision and enact new ways of leading. It also means developing a better understanding of how our employees and members identify themselves, and ensuring their values are represented in what we do.As I shared earlier it is not just simply about hiring more diverse talent. We need to be explicit with our D & I vision and let this guide our actions. We want to create a culture where diversity and inclusion is practiced by all but owned by leadership. And, that change doesn’t (and shouldn’t) happen overnight. To make these changes requires a joint effort (the collaboration and commitment traits discussed earlier) from everyone, from leadership to the front lines. There is no one-size fits all solution and it is important to understand this is a long-term commitment!Maurice Smith, former CUNA Board Chair and President/CEO of Local Government FCU had this to say about Diversity & Inclusion:“It must be everywhere from the grassroots of our communities to the top of our credit unions or we will not fully serve our purpose.”This is our WHY as credit unions – to reach, engage and serve diverse communities. The work of D & I requires certain ingredients to make it sustainable. It requires institutionalized “hard-wiring” of the D & I commitment, and data for tracking impact. As you look for support and/or guidance depending on where you are in your DEI journey, know there are many resources within the credit union space. Also, look outside of credit unions to other industry groups to learn more about what they are doing and how they are doing it.Why It’s ImportantThe heart of a good DEI strategy needs to focus on shifting our behaviors and mindsets and ensuring D & I is woven throughout the organization and at the center of all decision-making.With an approach that aligns awareness with action, addresses organizational culture and systems, and engages leaders, we can create and benefit from a more diverse workforce, a diverse and loyal membership, and reduce the negative consequences of getting it wrong.last_img read more

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5G to Launch in France in November, Observatory Being Set Up to Track Rollout

first_img5G technology promises an exponential leap in the amount and speed of wireless data that networks and handsets can handle, enabling advances in self-driving vehicles, virtual reality, connected health, and more as sensors and servers communicate nearly instantly.Are iPhone 12 mini, HomePod mini the Perfect Apple Devices for India? We discussed this on Orbital, our weekly technology podcast, which you can subscribe to via Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, or RSS, download the episode, or just hit the play button below. The latest generation 5G phone networks have a green light to go live in France later this month, the national telecoms regulator said Wednesday after wrapping up a frequency auction.France’s Arcep regulator said the auction brought in EUR 2.8 billion (roughly Rs. 24,400 crores) from four network operators – Bouygues Telecom, Free Mobile, Orange, and SFR.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –center_img It added that their 5G networks could begin commercial operations on November 18 but noted that administrative formalities meant that they would likely launch between November 20 and 30.The regulator also stated that it is setting up an observatory dedicated to 5G rollouts. The observatory will provide a wide range of information such as number of 5G cell sites, regional mapping of active 5G cell site deployments, and more. Arcep mentioned that in early 2021, it will publish details on cell site locations that operators plan on activating in the next three months, including information on available technology. It will also share information on location of cell sites for which an urban planning permit application has been filed.Arcep specified that by 2022, at least 75 percent of cell sites should be equipped to deliver speeds equal to a minimum of 240MBps. This obligation will be extended gradually to include the entirety of cell sites by 2030, when everyone is expected to supply 5G service.- Advertisement –last_img read more

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