A poetic beginning

first_img An artful response to the warming climate Amanda Gorman ’20 has written poems for big official occasions, including a 2019 Fourth of July reading with the Boston Pops and the 2018 inauguration of Harvard President Larry Bacow. But none of them prepared her entirely for the honor of being selected to read at the inauguration of President-elect Joe Biden and Vice President-elect Kamala Harris on Wednesday. ‘Weathering Change’ So honored to be the Inaugural Poet reciting at #InaugurationDay ! Not only am I excited to see @JoeBiden @KamalaHarris sworn in, but I also have the privilege of being the youngest Inaugural Poet in history. See you soon! https://t.co/b58CiVxMCD— Amanda Gorman (@TheAmandaGorman) January 14, 2021Gorman, who was named the U.S.’s first youth poet laureate in 2017, will perform a new poem titled “The Hill We Climb.” Its inspirations, she told ABC News, include unity and hope, and it draws from the events during the storming of the Capitol on Jan. 6“That day gave me a second wave of energy to finish the poem,” she said in the interview. “The poem isn’t blind. It isn’t turning your back to the evidence of discord and division.”Gorman’s work often reflects her commitment to social issues. Her 2014 poem “Neighborhood Anthem” addresses themes of inequality and injustice. Her 2018 poem “In the Eye Of,” included in the “Weathering Change” art anthology released by the Office for Sustainability, evokes the destructive force of hurricanes.“It’s not enough for me to write,” said Gorman. “I have to do right as well.”At 22 years old, Gorman is the nation’s youngest inaugural poet. Before her that distinction belonged to Richard Blanco, who was 44 when he read his “One Today” during former President Barack Obama’s second inauguration.“Congrats, Amanda, with all my love and admiration,” Blanco tweeted out in response to the news.The list of other presidential inauguration poets includes Maya Angelou, Robert Frost, Elizabeth Alexander, and Miller Williams.Gorman has called Angelou her greatest artistic inspiration, describing the late poet as her “spirit grandmother.” In a 2018 Gazette interview, she said that when confronted with a particularly difficult challenge she imagines herself sitting under a tree with Angelou, who reassures her, saying “Baby, everything is going to be OK.”At 16 years old, Gorman was named the youth poet laureate of her native Los Angeles in 2014. She published her first collection of poetry, “The One for Whom Food Is Not Enough,” in 2015. Gorman has a children’s picture book coming out later this year titled “Change Sings.” Vision for ‘Underground Railroad’ brought out the best in Colson Whitehead Youth laureate Amanda Gorman ’20 will deliver a special poem at Bacow’s inauguration center_img Related The poetic perspective The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Harvard Arts Medalist recalls journey behind Pulitzer Prize-winning novel: ‘I felt I needed to become a better writer’ last_img read more

Learn more →

Squishy Lawns

first_img K. Braman, UGA, CAES K. Braman, UGA, CAES “Get down low and part your turf,” Braman says. “You want to look into the thatch area, between the green and soil and look for the spittle masses or the adult spittle-bugs.” These wedge-shaped insects are only about a quarter-inch long. This squishy sound comes from the spittle masses formed by the spittle-bugnymphs, or immatures. Braman says the young insects form spittle masses in the grass toprotect themselves from predators and from drying out. “They also seem to like themoisture they create, so do anything you can to disrupt that high moistureenvironment,” she said.Braman says the first thing homeowners should do is get on their knees.”Get down low and part your turf,” she says. “You want to look into thethatch area, between the green and soil and look for the spittle masses or the adultspittle-bugs.”Just a quarter-inch in size, the adult spittle-bug has a black, wedge ortent shaped body with two red lines across its back. Thus, the name two-lined spittle-bug.The “spittle”part of the name comes from the messy spittle masses the younginsects create. “They become very apparent every summer when they land on peopletrying to mow their lawns,” said Braman.Although the spittle masses the young create are not attractive, it’s theadult spittle-bugs that cause the most damage to your lawn. “The adults haveneedle-like mouthparts to extract fluids from the plants,” said Braman. “Theyinject a toxin that causes the grass to wither and turn brown.”A common turfgrass pest, spittle-bugs feed on centipede and other warmseason grasses such as bermudagrass, zoysia and St. Augustine. In the Southeast, they alsofeed on some woody ornamentals.”Some holly trees, such a ‘Savannah’ Holly, are preferred by adultspittle-bugs,” said Braman. “If a tree has been infested, the new growth will betwisted and deformed and the leaves will have irregular brown blotches.”Braman says ornamental damage is caused by adult spittle-bugs. The nymphsof this species only feed on non-woody plants like turfgrass.”If you see spittlemasses in trees, they weren’t put there by two-lined spittle-bugs,” said Braman. ‘SQUISHY’-FEELING LAWNS are probably caused by spittle-bug masses, above. Immature spittle-bugs, below, create these masses to protect themselves from predators and to keep from drying out. ÿÿ K. Braman, UGA, CAEScenter_img If centipede is the grass of choice in your lawn, check now for tiny,two-lined spittle-bugs that could be destroying your lawn, bite by bite.”If you walk across your grass and it’s squishy, chances are, you’vegot two-lined spittle-bugs,” said KrisBraman, an entomologist with the University of GeorgiaCollege of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”It sounds and feels like you are walking on a sponge.” If you find two-lined spittle-bugs in your lawn, don’t panic. “Theyare really visible insects and just because you see them, it doesn’t mean your grass isgoing to die,” said Braman. The populations of two-lined spittle-bugs are high during the summermonths. “This insect goes through two generations each summer,” said Braman.”Adults begin to fly in June and a second set of adults will be seen in August.”The first step to reducing populations in your lawn is to keep your grassmowed to the proper height. “Just because your turfgrass is a low maintenancevariety, doesn’t mean it’s a no maintenance variety,” said Braman. “You have tokeep the thatch area from being overdeveloped because that’s where the insects areliving.”The spittle-bugs also like the edges of the grass along the sidewalks andnear hedges where the grass is shaded. “People sometimes over fertilize centipede andthis is bad for several reasons,” said Braman. “The spittle-bugs like the extranitrogen and the grass doesn’t. Centipede is naturally yellow-green, but people try toforce it to be kelly green by over fertilizing.”Braman says this creates a thicker and denser grass, which is a favorableenvironment for two-lined spittle-bugs.Working with UGA turfgrass breeders and horticulturists, Braman isresearching turfgrass and holly cultivars that are resistant to harmful insects, such asthe two-lined spittle-bug. Researchers have found avoiding landscape combinations likecentipede turf and ‘Savannah’ hollies can be an easy solution to spittle-bug lawnproblems.If spittle-bugs are a problem in your home landscape, Braman suggestshomeowners limit irrigation to avoid creating an environment that’s a magnet forspittle-bugs. “Georgia’s drought conditions may help reduce the populations thisyear, but irrigation favors the insect’s development,” said Braman.last_img read more

Learn more →

Suffolk Exec Bellone Must Learn That Wishing is No Substitute for Planning

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone’s Connect Long Island idea has become a project that relies upon assumptions instead of realities.What started as a relatively simple concept, employing Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) lines to connect downtown areas with research centers and employment hubs, has evolved into so much more.When it was first announced in 2012, the County Executive’s office explained that “the Connect Long Island initiative aims to create new mass-transit connections between major roadways, Long Island Rail Road stations and transit-oriented downtowns to relieve traffic congestion, increase mobility and spur economic growth.”At the time, economist Marty Cantor, Suffolk’s former economic development commissioner, issued a strong rebuke of the proposal.“Connect Long Island makes little sense,” he wrote, “considering that there is no current demand for a bus service that won’t materialize for two decades, will cost millions of dollars that Suffolk doesn’t have and requires new buses, new road systems and old expensive labor.”A couple of years later, instead of just linking areas like Patchogue to Stony Brook University, the project is being used to justify the electrification of the LIRR’s Port Jefferson Branch and the addition of  a double track on the LIRR between Farmingdale and Ronkonkoma. The future of the double track is uncertain, and electrification isn’t even listed on the MTA’s next five-year capital plan, which already faces at least a $15-billion hole before it can be finalized.A fundamental flaw of the proposal is that still tenuous projects like Heartland Town Square in Islip are another part of the equation. Bellone is envisioning his Connect Long Island proposal linking the mega project to both the Deer Park and Kings Park LIRR stations, while the expansion of the state-owned Sagtikos Parkway, necessary to accommodate the anticipated spike in traffic from thousands of new residents, is far from a done deal. Yet somehow Connect Long Island is now based on the assumption that Heartland will be built and the road will somehow be widened.Read “Heartland Town Square Proposal Is Too Big For Only Islip Town Board’s Approval” HEREThe Suffolk county executive also proposed the creation of an additional BRT line to the Yaphank LIRR station. Bellone has since suggested running an additional railroad spur from the mainline to the Brookhaven National Lab. Realistically, between the lack of government funding and the large tracts of land that it would require which are located in the heavily restricted Central Pine Barrens, this extension would seem extremely unlikely unless there is federal intervention.Basically, Bellone needs to show some hard data in order to justify the notion that Connect Long Island is even a viable option. Is there marked demand for north-south transit linkages in Stony Brook, Kings Park and Yaphank? Even the much-touted Route 110 corridor’s BRT route could use accurate ridership projections instead of the administration’s anecdotes.A good idea doesn’t necessarily mean it’s the right idea. We need to have fact-backed proposals, not a “build it and they will come” mindset.Enough is enough.Suffolk County isn’t engaging in planning, but rather in wishing. It’s pushing for important expansions in our wastewater infrastructure not on the merits of protecting our environment—a truly vital concern for the Island’s future—but on the rather slippery slope of promoting more growth. And so, areas as diverse as Hampton Bays and Smithtown are promoted for development under the guise of plugging that overhyped “Brain Drain” dilemma when the demographics don’t justify it and the real need gets muddied. Wastewater treatment should not be mistaken for bulking up the Island’s “emergency preparedness” after Superstorm Sandy. Those are different concerns.What once was a good idea thanks to its simplicity and relative ease of implementation, has, like all else in the development world here, become everything to everyone.We, as an Island, cannot just build our way out of our economic woes. Further, we must become smarter about approving projects of regional significance. Under the current model, we run the risk of both over-saturating our already struggling economy, and worse, creating higher density sprawl that augments our problems rather than alleviating them.Bellone’s concept isn’t all bad. Any proposal that brings a sense of regional cohesion to the Island should be explored, but do it in a serious manner. Anecdotes don’t justify land use policies.The key to Connect Long Island’s success is highlighting the potential benefits to our residents, and making them want to leave their cars and climb aboard the Bus Rapid Transit line instead. The county executive should focus all of his publicity resources on promoting the Route 110 corridor, an already successful employment hub on the Island. This area should serve as the pilot program. If it’s successful, and if ridership projections justify it, then implement the BRT on Nicholls Road.Do Stony Brook students truly want to travel to Patchogue? Find out. Do workers at the Stony Brook University hospital and the campus actually commute south to north? Provide the analysis. Where do Brookhaven National Laboratory workers really reside? Would they ever use the LIRR in enough numbers to justify the additional track work?Instead of telling stories, Suffolk County has to roll up its sleeves and get to work on planning. Maybe the data will show that Connect Long Island is a great idea. Maybe it won’t. We won’t know for sure until we actually do the research and the results are in. Wishing will not make it so.Rich Murdocco writes on Long Island’s land use and real estate development issues. He received his Master’s in Public Policy at Stony Brook University, where he studied regional planning under Dr. Lee Koppelman, Long Island’s veteran master planner. Murdocco will be contributing regularly to the Long Island Press. More of his views can be found on www.TheFoggiestIdea.org or follow him on Twitter @TheFoggiestIdea.last_img read more

Learn more →

Five Star Investments buys £1.7m warehouse

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

Learn more →

European financial supervisors to take sustainability into account

first_imgThe European Commission has proposed that the European Supervisory Authorities (ESAs) incorporate environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks into their work. The proposal is one of several measures it presented today to reform the ESAs. These include EIOPA, the supervisory authority for pension schemes and insurers, EBA, for the banking industry, and ESMA, which is responsible for macro-prudential regulation.The Commission’s ESG-related proposals were intended to make sure “sustainability considerations are systematically taken into account in supervisory practices at the European level”. It said the ESAs could help prevent disjointed moves in the area of sustainable finance across the EU. By incorporating ESG risks into their work, the ESAs would be able to “monitor how financial institutions identify, report and address risks that ESG factors may pose to financial stability, thereby making financial markets activity more consistent with sustainable objectives”, according to the Commission.  “The ESAs will also provide guidance on how EU financial legislation can integrate sustainability considerations and promote the implementation of these rules.”Enhancing the ESAs’ role in assessing ESG-related risks was one of the recommendations made by the High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on sustainable finance to the Commission in its interim report in July. The advisory body suggested EIOPA could include ESG risks in its stress tests of pension funds – an idea that PensionsEurope, the European umbrella association of national pension fund trade bodies, has rejected.In its submission to HLEG’s consultation, PensionsEurope argued that there was “no clear picture in the scientific literature whether risks and returns of ESG portfolios are actually systematically different from those of conventionally managed portfolios”.The HLEG also recommended that the ESAs increased their knowledge and expertise on sustainability. PensionsEurope noted that European pension funds did not have a harmonised prudential regime and instead fell under the supervision of national supervisors.“We believe it is necessary that both European and national supervisors start building up capacity and tools in order to be able to consider ESG factors in the future in financial supervision while striving for supervisory convergence,” it said.The HLEG’s consultation on its early recommendations closes today. It is due to present a final report in December and the Commission has said it would decide on any concrete follow-ups by the end of next year.The next step for the Commission’s ESA reform proposals is for them to be discussed by the European Parliament and the Council. Other aspects of the proposals include introducing industry contributions to fund the ESAs, changing the ESAs’ governance structures by introducing independent executive boards, and giving ESA stakeholders a stronger say in the guidelines and recommendations issued by the supervisory authorities.last_img read more

Learn more →

Modulift Revamps Subsea Beams for O&G Project

first_imgBelow-the-hook equipment manufacturer Modulift has recently refurbished two subsea spreader beams for a subsea installation contractor before they were used to lift 260t and 280t manifolds for a field development offshore Libya.The standard Modulift SUB 380 beams originally offered up to 380t at 9m or 30 ft. and up to 16m or 52 ft. at a lower capacity.However, in this case, Modulift re-rated the capacity to 364t working load limit (WLL) with +1.5 dynamic amplification factor (DAF). The drop links were re-rated to 200t WLL, also with 1.5 DAF, and new data plates were added accordingly.Chris Schwab, account executive at Modulift, explained: “The principle reason for refurbishing the beams was so they could be reused on another project that required an additional strut to achieve a new span, and they needed to be re-rated to a higher capacity, yet lower DAF.”It was necessary to manufacture new 0.95m struts for each beam and shotblast all existing components. Testing was conducted on welds, plus new spans and capacities. The drop links had already been tested to a sufficient capacity as part of an earlier project, thus, additional testing for these was not required, Modulift said.Also included within the scope of work was the supply of new bolts and preparation of a calculations report so DNV could carry out verification against its Loadout, Transport and Installation of Subsea Objects criteria.Unlike Modulift’s standard spreader beams that are manufactured using circular hollow sections, the subsea range has an open section design, suitable for water submersion by eliminating the risks of cavity or pressure issues. They are finished with a three-coat paint system that is based on a two-pack epoxy paint system suitable for the marine heavy lifting environment.The physical size of the manifolds—fabricated in Ravenna, Italy—meant that they could only be brought offshore via a barge. Ground loading and crane capacity issues on site resulted in a requirement for a tandem crane lift. The installation vessel, however, had a single crane so to simulate the installation lift a single point lift was required. Schwab explained that the structures land on pre-installed guideposts and piles on the seabed so the structures require a very tight tolerance on installation level / trim.To achieve a simulated offshore single point lift, Modulift provided a MOD250/400 spreader beam and associated rigging to ‘join’ the two site cranes together using an inverted spreader bar arrangement. The SUB 380 spreader bar on each structure was connected to the structure via high performance synthetic slings and ROV-friendly shackles to form the installation rigging arrangement on the structures.Once subsea the Manifolds will act to combine power, communications, service fluids and production pipework from multiple gas wells into a single main pipeline/umbilical system.last_img read more

Learn more →

PM seeks public advice on 2% salary tax for medical purposes

first_imgLocalNews PM seeks public advice on 2% salary tax for medical purposes by: – April 26, 2012 Hon. Roosevelt SkerritPrime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit has made a proposal to the people of Dominica that would require a 2% tax on their salaries for what he describes as a worthy cause.The Prime Minister, who is also responsible for Finance, said he wants public advice on whether he should impose a 2% levy on the workforce which would go towards a special fund for persons who may have to travel abroad for medical attention.Skerrit said while government is always willing to help Dominicans in these circumstances, it is putting a dent in the treasury’s purse.“We need to create a special committee where we can be advised of what are the services our people go out of Dominica for. What are the technical services we need, human resources, to ensure that our people can get that service because I see too many of our people suffer because they do not have the money to go out of Dominica to get medical care. Our goal should be to provide those services at a minimal charge to our people and I believe it can be achieved. One of the ways we can finance it, partly, is by a proposal I have put before the public, where every working persons in this country can contribute to 2% of his salary,” he said.The Prime Minister said measures must be put in place to finance their “road to recovery”.“Someone may say that I have insurance and this not for me. But life is a very strange thing. Today we are up there and tomorrow we are down there. Do not wait for when it affects your family or you directly to be concerned. The fact is everyone one of us will find ourselves on a hospital bed at some point,” he said.He also called on nurses to work with government, to achieve a better health care service for Dominica.Dominica Vibes News 31 Views   3 comments Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img Share Share Tweetlast_img read more

Learn more →

ORVC Weekly Report (September 18-23)

first_imgORVC Weekly Report (September 18-23)Players of the Week.Volleyball:  Abby Ralston – Southwestern.Girls Cross Country:  Shianna Bellingham – Jac-Cen-Del.Boys Cross Country:  Bradley Winston – SouthwesternBoys Soccer:  Mitchell Cline – Southwestern.Girls Soccer:  Emma Foley – Southwestern.ORVC Report (September 18-23)Courtesy of ORVC Recorder Travis Calvert.last_img

Learn more →

Atchison checkers fly for Brown, Powell

first_imgBy Rick StaleyATCHISON, Kan. (June 24) – Derrick Brown and Jim Powell Jr. were winners of IMCA features that ran green to checkered Friday at Atchison County Raceway.Brown picked up his second local feature win of the season, leading every lap of the Xtreme Mo­tor Sports IMCA Modified main. Steven Bowers Jr. raced through the pack to challenge Brown late, coming up with a close second place finish.Tony Layne, Jeremy Chambers and Nicholas Carpenter rounded out the top five.Greg Keuhn had the early lead until Jim Powell Jr. charged through the IMCA Sunoco Stock Car field en route to his third Atchison County victory of 2016. Brad Whitney held off Gene Stigall for third and fifth place belonged to Josh Steele.IMCA Stock Cars were crowned “Best in Show” with the 10th finishing position being drawn and the added $100 cash awarded to Todd Wilson.last_img read more

Learn more →

Alma L. Miller

first_imgAlma L. Miller, age 86 of Batesville, died Friday, January 10, 2020 at the Waters of Batesville.  Born December 17, 1933 in Batesville, she was the daughter of Cora (Nee: Engle) and George Bloemer.  She married Earl (Hooker) Miller January 18, 1964 at St. Louis Church and he preceded her in death August 16, 2018.  She was a member of St. Louis Church, the Daughters of Isabella and the Prell-Bland American Legion Ladies Auxiliary. She worked at the local Sears Roebuck catalog store in the early 1970’s and then worked in Customer service at Hill-Rom until her retirement in 1995.Music was an important part of Alma’s life.  She was a member of the St. Louis Choir for nearly 30 years.  She also sang with the Batesville Ecumenical Choir, for other special events and went caroling with various groups during the Christmas season.  Those choir members became like a second family to her, attending weddings, birthdays and family functions of the other members and their children.  She loved going to the park to listen to the Eureka Band, the Symphony in the Park and other musical events hosted by the Rural Alliance for Arts. As an avid bowler, Alma belonged to a number of leagues throughout the years.  She was still bowling twice weekly in leagues at the age of 79!Spending time with family was Alma’s greatest passion. She enjoyed getting together and keeping in touch with extended family especially her nieces and nephews. During family holiday parties, she loved playing the piano and having family sing-a-longs. As a grandparent, she happily attended all her grandchildren’s events, functions and extracurricular activities.  Alma had a soft spot for dogs and considered them part of the family too.  According to her kids, all her dogs grew pudgy, as she showed her love by sharing cookies and other treats with them. In her later years her furry friends brought much comfort to her as her abilities declined.Alma is survived by her daughter and son-in-law Ann and Rob Edwards; son Jim Miller, all of Batesville; grandchildren Justin Edwards of Nashville, Tennessee, Lindsay (Chad) Konradi of Indianapolis; great grandson Caleb Konradi and would have welcomed a great granddaughter to the family in March.  In addition to her husband and parents, she is also preceded in death by sisters Rosemary Stehlin, Georgann Flory and brother Raymond (Boz)  Bloemer.Visitation is Thursday, January 16th, from 4 – 7 p.m. at the Weigel Funeral Home with a prayer service conducted by the Daughters of Isabella at 4 p.m.  Funeral services are 10 a.m. Friday, January 17th at St. Louis Church with burial in the church cemetery. In lieu of flowers the family requests memorials to Margaret Mary Health Foundation Hospice or the Batesville Area Arts Council.last_img read more

Learn more →