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Investment in equity MFs drops 35 to Rs 111 lakh crore in

first_imgNew Delhi: Investors pumped in more than Rs 1.11 lakh crore in equity-oriented mutual fund (MF) schemes in 2018-19, a decline of 35 per cent compared to Rs 1.71 lakh crore inflows in 2017-18, according to the industry data. However, this was the fifth successive year of net inflows in equity mutual funds, according to the Association of Mutual Funds in India’s (AMFI) data. In 2017-18, the markets were on a roll but in 2018-19 the markets were very volatile due to various factors, including border tensions with Pakistan, AMFI Chief Executive Officer N S Venkatesh said. Also Read – Thermal coal import may surpass 200 MT this fiscalThere was a steep correction in small and mid-cap stocks also. The market volatility and corrections pulled down net inflows in the equities in 2018-19, he said. “But despite that the current inflows of Rs 1.11 lakh crore is a substantial investment by the mutual fund industry into the equities segment which is more than FII investments into the country,” he added. The flows into equity funds in 2018-19 were lower than the flows in 2017-18 primarily due to the equity markets displaying a fair bit of volatility which made some investors take a break from making fresh equity investments, said Kaustubh Belapurkar, manager research, Morningstar. Also Read – Food grain output seen at 140.57 mt in current fiscal on monsoon boostAccording to the AMFI data, net inflows into equity funds, which also include equity-linked saving schemes (ELSS), were Rs 1,11,423 crore in 2018-19 as against Rs 1,71,069 crore in the preceding fiscal. Net inflows in these funds were Rs 70,367 crore in 2016-17, Rs 74,024 crore in 2015-16 and Rs 71,029 crore in 2014-15, respectively. However, they had witnessed a net outflow of Rs 9,269 crore in 2013-14. The assets under management (AUM) of equity MFs stood at a record high of Rs 7.73 lakh crore at the end of March 2019 as against Rs 7.50 lakh crore in March 2018, an increase of 3 per cent. During 2018-19, the SIP (Systematic Investment Plans) accounts grew by 51 lakh to 2.62 crore from 2.11 crore in March 2018. Besides, SIP contribution to the industry surged to Rs 92,693 crore in 2018-19, from Rs 67,190 crore in the preceding fiscal.last_img read more


Two years after Haitian quake UN Ambassador Against Hunger views progress

5 January 2012Almost two years after a devastating earthquake struck Haiti, a high-profile advocate for the United Nations food relief agency has visited the Caribbean country to survey the agency’s efforts in fighting malnutrition among those made homeless by the disaster. In his first trip to Haiti, Canadian journalist and World Food Programme (WFP) Ambassador Against Hunger George Stroumboulopoulos saw the progress being made on the ground by the UN and other aid providers since the 12 January 2010 quake, the agency reported today.His first stop was a camp for internally displaced persons (IDPs) known as Camp Sersal, which is home to an estimated 10,000 people living in tents or temporary shelters. Mr. Stroumboulopoulos visited a large tent housing the camp’s medical services where children – ranging from the ages of six months to five years – are weighed and measured to determine whether they suffer from malnutrition. Pregnant and nursing women are also examined for any signs of malnourishment.When the medical centre’s test results indicate moderate malnutrition in its patients, they are immediately enrolled in the WFP’s programme against hunger and moved to a smaller tent nearby to receive a special fortified food until they recover their full health. “That ad hoc health centre has to serve a lot of people and right out of there, you address family nutrition needs and you have the feeding centre next to it,” said Mr. Stroumboulopoulos, as he observed the bustling clinic. He then visited a public school where children were benefiting from a WFP feeding initiative. Every day, across Haiti, the UN agency and its partners provide full meals to roughly 1.1 million school children. In addition, the WFP has been helping the Haitian Government build a universal school meals programme by developing strong links between local farmers and schools. “I like how the school feeding program is so tied to education so you feel you’re not just addressing an emergency situation,” noted Mr. Stroumboulopoulos. “You’re not just feeding somebody because they’re hungry. Here, kids are coming, they’re learning, they’re reading, and they’re eating at the same time. Both are feeding into each other,” he added. “It’s cool to see all of that.” read more


Ottawabased grocery chain Farm Boy looks to southern Ontario and Toronto for

OTTAWA — Shoppers in Ottawa have headed to Farm Boy grocery stores for years, fans of its high-quality fruits and vegetables, locally produced artisanal cheeses and private-label soups and tourtieres.With Farm Boy’s commitment to both local farmers and products made by local suppliers, as well as the growing line of store-brand products, the retailer has a loyal following in Canada’s capital region.Now the chain is looking for new devotees as it brings its brand of fresh and local to the massive southern Ontario market.Over the last two years, Farm Boy has opened stores in London, Kitchener, Brantford and Whitby.Canada could be in for an even tougher grocery war after European mass disruptionFrom bakeries to billions: Inside the Weston family’s takeover of Canada’s dinner plates and its retail appetites“Each market is a little different, but at the end people want great food, great service in a friendly shopping environment,” Farm Boy chief executive Jeff York said in a recent interview.The company has avoided Toronto and its sky-high rents so far, but York has his eye on the market.Farm Boy is working on what York is calling the chain’s first “urban concept” store set to open in Ottawa later this summer with more fresh prepared food and improved options for eating it in the store. He says the smaller format amounts to a laboratory where they’ll work out the design close to home before taking it to the big city.“We’ll make our mistakes in Ottawa, and once we can hone the model, we can go into Toronto and maybe pay a buck or two more in rent,” he said.In November 2012, U.S. firm Berkshire Partners made an investment in the privately held company. While terms of the deal were not disclosed, it helped give the company access to cash and expertise to fuel its expansion.When Berkshire made its investment, Farm Boy had 13 stores in Ottawa, Cornwall and Kingston. Today, the chain is set to open store No. 22 this fall in Pickering, Ont., east of Toronto.York said his sights are set on $1 billion in annual sales in the next five to eight years, an increase that would represent a tripling of what Farm Boy does now.Founded in 1981 in Cornwall, Ont., Farm Boy has made its name with a focus on high-quality produce, meat, bakery and prepared foods and private-label products.We’ll make our mistakes in Ottawa, and once we can hone the model, we can go into Toronto and maybe pay a buck or two more in rent.York says he gets lots of ideas from U.S. chains like Trader Joe’s, Whole Foods, Fairway and Dean & DeLuca and tries to incorporate them in his stores.Farm Boy isn’t a one-stop shop, and York makes no apologies that you can’t pick up your dish soap, paper towels and shampoo at the same time as you buy your carrots and bread.“We don’t want to pretend we can compete in all the different areas,” he said. “We just want to fill that niche for the best fresh experience.”The grocery store business is a competitive field with major Canadian players like Loblaw and Sobeys as well as big U.S. players like Walmart and Whole Foods.Ian Lee, who teaches strategy at Carleton University’s Sprott School of Business, noted Farm Boy faces a number of hurdles, including finding prime locations that haven’t already been snapped up and raising brand awareness in markets where it’s not yet established.“It’s going to be a tough slog because Loblaws is formidable, Whole Foods is formidable,” Lee said of Farm Boy’s expansion. “Location we know in retail of any kind, including grocery stores, is always extremely important, so they’re going to have to really spend money.”He added Farm Boy needs to be cautious in its expansion plans.“As long as Farm Boy does a controlled, slow, incremental expansion, so that they learn from each area that they’re going into, whether it is Pickering or Mississauga or Toronto or whatever, they should be OK,” he said. read more


RCMP confirm three Saskatoon residents killed in Alberta crash

Alberta RCMP confirmed Thursday that all three victims in Tuesday’s 10-vehicle collision were residents of Saskatoon.The three people killed were described as two women, ages 69 and 52, and a 54-year-old man.RCMP will not release their names, an RCMP media spokesperson said.Ten other people were injured in the collision, two of whom were listed in critical condition.The crash occurred Tuesday around 4:30 p.m. roughly 300 kilometres east of Calgary between the small Alberta communities of Chinook and Cereal, when a semi truck hauling fuel ignited in a construction zone, causing several other vehicles, including another truck carrying butane, to catch fire.Story continues belowThis advertisement has not loaded yet,but your article continues below.Dore Germo, who witnessed the aftermath of the crash, said “It kind of looked like a bomb had gone off because there were these burnt out vehicles and it was very eerie.”The RCMP’s victim services unit is providing support to people involved in the crash.“The investigation into this collision remains a lengthy process given the nature of the crash scene,” RCMP said in Wednesday’s release. “It is anticipated that it will take several weeks for the collision analyst to complete the investigation.”— With Canadian Press files read more


Goooooal Beckham shoots for UNICEF tsunami relief campaign

Newly appointed a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador, Mr. Beckham will speak out in a 30-second public service announcement to help raise funds to support urgent humanitarian aid for the next six-months for the 1.5 million children affected by the disaster who are in critical need of basic care and support.“It is one of the proudest moments of my life to be given the role of UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador and I hope to play a part in supporting these children at their time of need,” the star midfielder said.UNICEF Executive Director Carol Bellamy said she was “absolutely delighted” at his new off-field position. “The global TV appeal he has recorded will be enormously useful to help UNICEF meet the immediate survival needs of children affected by the tsunami in the short term and in the weeks and months ahead as they rebuild their lives,” she added.A long-standing fan of UNICEF, Mr. Beckham was introduced to the agency at the Manchester United football club, which has raised over some $2 million for UNICEF’s work. read more


Study New safety technology lowers chance that driver will die in a

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Study: New safety technology lowers chance that driver will die in a car crash WASHINGTON – The chances of a driver dying in a crash in a late-model car or light truck fell by more than a third over three years, and nine car models had zero deaths per million registered vehicles, according to a study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.Improved vehicle designs and safety technology have a lot to do with the reduced risk, but a weak economy that led to reductions in driving may also have played a role, the institute said.The study, which examined fatalities involving 2011 model year vehicles, looked at how many driver fatalities occurred in a particular model over the course of a year of operation, expressed as a rate per million registered vehicle years. It found there was an average of 28 driver deaths per million registered vehicle years through the 2012 calendar year, down from 48 deaths for 2008 models through 2009.When the institute looked at the issue eight years ago, there were no models with driver death rates of zero.David Zuby, the institute’s chief research officer, called it “a huge improvement,” even considering the effect of a weak economy. “We know from our vehicle ratings program that crash test performance has been getting steadily better. These latest death rates provide new confirmation that real-world outcomes are improving too.”Among the improvements credited for declining death rates is the widespread adoption of electronic stability control, which has dramatically lessened the risk of rollover crashes. SUVs had some of the highest rates a decade ago due to their propensity to roll over.The rollover death rate of 5 per million registered vehicle years for 2011 models is less than a quarter of what it was for 2004 models, and six of the nine vehicles with zero deaths were SUVs.Side air bags and structural changes to vehicles are also helping. Automakers are engineering vehicles with stronger occupant compartments that hold up better in front, side and rollover crashes, allowing the seatbelts and air bags to do their jobs well, said Russ Rader, an institute spokesman.Improved technologies were responsible for saving 7,700 driver lives in 2012 when compared to how cars were made in 1985, the institute said.But the gap between safest and riskiest models remains wide. Three 2011 models had rates exceeding 100 deaths per million registered vehicle years. The riskiest models were mostly lower-priced small cars, while the safest models were all mid-sized or large vehicles.The nine models with zero deaths were: Audi A4 four-wheel drive, a midsized luxury car; Honda Odyssey, a minivan; Kia Sorento two-wheel drive, a mid-sized SUV; the Lexus RX 350 four-wheel drive, a midsized luxury SUV; Mercedes-Benz GL-Class four-wheel drive, a large luxury SUV; Subaru Legacy four-wheel drive, a 4-door midsized car; Toyota Highlander hybrid, a four-wheel drive midsized SUV; Toyota Sequoia, a four-wheel drive large SUV, and Volvo XC90, a four-wheel drive luxury midsized SUV.While most were luxury models, two — the Subaru Legacy and the Kia Sorrento — are moderately priced.The vehicles with the highest death rates were the Kia Rio, a 4-door mini car, 149 deaths per million registered vehicles; Nissan Versa, a small 4-door sedan, 130 deaths, and Hyundai Accent, a 4-door mini car, 120 deaths.The declining death rates come as safety advocates in the U.S. and elsewhere set their sights on a goal of eliminating motor vehicle deaths. Sweden’s parliament adopted a “Vision Zero” policy in 1997. New York City has since adopted a similar policy. The Governors Highway Safety Association, which represents state highway safety offices, issued a plan “Toward Zero Deaths” in 2009.The institute has published death rates by make and model periodically since 1989, at first for cars only and later for all passenger vehicles. The rates include only driver deaths because the presence of passengers is unknown.Although the latest numbers reflect 2011 models, the study included data from earlier-model year vehicles as far back as 2008 if the vehicles weren’t substantially redesigned before 2011. Including older, equivalent vehicles increases the exposure and thus the accuracy of the results, the institute said. To be included, a vehicle must have had at least 100,000 registered vehicle years of exposure during 2009-12, or at least 20 deaths.___Follow Joan Lowy on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/AP_Joan_Lowy In this photo taken July 4, 2014, a Hollywood street is closed at an accident scene during an investigation after a car crash in West Hollywood, Calif. The chances of dying in a crash in a late-model car or light truck fell by more than a third over three years, and nine car models had zero deaths per million registered vehicles, according to a study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (AP Photo/Richard Vogel) by Joan Lowy, The Associated Press Posted Jan 29, 2015 11:42 am MDT read more


Somalias efforts to build cohesive State require international support Security Council told

“2014 is a crucial year… marked by security and political challenges, which will be overcome if the Federal Government of Somalia and international partners remain united and if both accelerate delivery of their mutual commitments,” Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Nicholas Kay, told the 15-member Council via video conference from Mogadishu, urging continued support from donors and other stockholders. “Progress in Somalia has been mixed so far, but it is progress,” he added. “National reconciliation, federalism, the conclusion of the constitutional process and the rebuilding of security institutions are critical.” Security remains a vital concern, particularly in Mogadishu where the situation has deteriorated as insurgents carried out often complex suicide attacks against several targets, including a UN convoy, the Presidential compound and the National Intelligence headquarters, “all in the month of February.” “The risk of further attacks against Somali Government and international targets remains high,” warned Mr. Kay, who is also the head of the UN Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM). He added that the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) and the Somali National Army (SNA) are pursuing a renewed offensive against Al Shabaab insurgents, who in 2011 were forced to retreat from the capital. This new offensive “will be the most significant and geographically extensive military advance” since AMISOM was created in 2007, Mr. Kay said, highlighting the UN’s role through its support office for AMISOM (UNSOA) in stockpiling food, fuel and water ahead of the operations. UNSOA, along with UNSOM, has also supported training the army in human rights, international humanitarian and refugee law, in accordance with Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s Human Rights Due Diligence Policy. Despite the obvious importance of greater security, “the political dimension of state-building and peace-building is equally vital this year,” the Special Representative underscored. After decades of factional fighting, new Somali Government institutions emerged last year, as the country ended a transitional phase toward setting up a permanent, democratically-elected Government under President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud. “As we meet, the Federal Government is finalizing a detailed plan and timetable for a process leading to the formation of Federal States, a final Constitution and democratisation by 2016,” Mr. Kay told the Council. This formation of Federal States “needs to be accelerated”, he said, noting the positive steps towards political cooperation in Jubaland and in Puntland. Among other issues raised in his briefing, Mr. Kay noted that a change in immigration policy in Saudi Arabia forced back more than 22,000 Somalis with an additional 33,000 people expected to return in the next three months. The influx into Mogadishu “could exacerbate the plight of the internally displaced” in the country, which, at 1 million people, are part of the largest and most complex humanitarian crisis in the world. read more


Swift courageous action needed to stem tide of illegal migration – UNICEF

In a statement issued earlier today, UNICEF warned that reports of tragedies on the Mediterranean were becoming “all too frequent and the human cost all too high,” adding that children often shouldered the greater burden of illegal migration and its repercussions.“Children who find themselves on these journeys are exposed to abuse, exploitation and possibly death and, if they survive, are often placed in unsafe and unsuitable conditions and / or criminalized,” the statement declared. “We ask that all actions are guided by the best interests of every one of these children, every step of the way,” it continued. “No matter their refugee or migrant status, children are to be cared for in a safe place – and not in a detention facility – with access to education, health, social and legal services with full implementation of existing safeguards especially for the most vulnerable.” Italy’s ‘Mare Nostrum,’ a major search and rescue programme aimed at saving migrants in the Mediterranean, was replaced in December 2014 by the European Union’s current ‘Triton’ operation amid an uptick in sea crossings in the region. Nonetheless, the number of casualties for this year has already grown to 1,600 – almost half of the 2014 total of 3,500. 2015, in fact, has seen some 31,500 people make crossings to Italy and Greece – the first and second largest countries of arrival respectively. The UN refugee agency (UNHCR) has reported that numbers have also been recently picking up as weather conditions in the Mediterranean improve.“With the start of the warmer weather in Europe when numbers of migrants are likely to rise, decisive action could avoid more senseless deaths,” UNICEF concurred in its statement. “This means following the EU’s existing safeguards for unaccompanied minors, strengthening search-and-rescue capacities to save and protect lives, prosecuting human traffickers, and tackling the root causes of migration in countries of origin – conflict, poverty and discrimination – to avoid more tragic losses.”Meanwhile, UNHCR has announced it has completed its run of interviews with survivors of last weekend’s deadly boat capsizing in which over 800 people are presumed to have died. The interviews – conducted by UNHCR staff on the ground in Sicily – revealed that the boat departed from Tripoli, Libya on the morning of 18 April with some 850 people on board, including 350 Eritreans as well as people from Syria, Somalia, Sierra Leone, Mali, Senegal, Gambia, Côte d’Ivoire and Ethiopia. Only 28 people are known to have survived the shipwreck. “The migrants looked exhausted, fragile, astonished to see so many people waiting for them,” said UNHCR spokesperson Carlotta Sami. “They will need psychological support. They are receiving food and water.”Against that backdrop, in a press release issued earlier this afternoon the UN Committee on the Rights of Migrant Workers (CMW) said voiced its shock and dismay at “the appalling loss of life” in the Mediterranean. “While it is true that there is no magic solution to immediately solve this issue, three things are crystal clear to the Committee,” observed CMW Chairperson Francisco Carrion Mena.Mr. Carrion Mena outlined the need for enhanced search and rescue capabilities to save people in distress, the better management of migration flows by European authorities, and a greater effort by the international community to tackle the roots causes of illegal migration.“The drivers of poverty and conflict which push people to take the extreme action of crossing the seas in search of work, peace and decent living conditions are not going to disappear without concerted action by States,” he declared. Later in the day, the Security Council, in a statement issued to the press in New York, deplored the maritime tragedy, and expressed grave concern at the recent proliferation of, and endangerment of lives by, the smuggling of migrants in the Mediterranean Sea, off the coast of Libya.“The members of the Security Council expressed their concern at the implications for regional stability posed by transnational organized crime and illicit activities such as the smuggling of migrants,” said the statement, by which the Council condemned and deplored such acts and underlined the need to bring the perpetrators of these acts to justice.Against such a backdrop, the Council called for the full implementation by State Parties of the Protocol against the Smuggling of Migrants by Land, Sea and Air, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime. read more


Mens Basketball Ohio State faces toughest challenge to date against No 5

Ohio State senior forward Jae’Sean Tate finishes a dunk in the first half against Appalachian State on Dec. 16, 2017 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Ashley Nelson | Station ManagerSince playing Michigan on Dec. 4, Ohio State (10-3, 2-0 Big Ten) has dominated three straight nonconference opponents, scoring at least 80 points and allowing no more than 67 points in any game. The Buckeyes will not find their next matchup quite as easy. They travel to New Orleans to play No. 5 North Carolina in the CBS Sports Classic at 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Here is a rundown of what to expect out of that game.Projected StartersUNC:G — Joel Berry II — Senior, 6-foot, 195 lbs., 17.1 ppg, 2.8 rpg, 3.5 apg, G — Kenny Williams — Junior, 6-foot-4, 185 lbs., 13.2 ppg, 3.3 rpg, 2.0 apgG/F — Theo Pinson — Senior, 6-foot-6, 220 lbs., 8.6 ppg, 5.2 rpg, 4.7 apgF — Garrison Brooks — Freshman, 6-foot-9, 215 lbs., 6.8 ppg, 4.6 rpg, 0.8 apgF — Luke Maye — Junior, 6-foot-8, 240 lbs., 19.3 ppg, 10.6 rpg, 2.3 apgOhio State:G — Musa Jallow — Freshman, 6-foot-5, 200 lbs., 4.2 ppg, 2.2 rpg, 1.3 apgG — C.J. Jackson — Junior, 6-foot-1, 175 lbs., 13.0 ppg, 4.0 rpg, 4.4 apgF — Jae’Sean Tate — Senior, 6-foot-4, 230 lbs., 12.9 ppg, 5.7 rpg, 2.9 apgF — Keita Bates-Diop — Redshirt junior, 6-foot-7, 235 lbs., 18.2 ppg, 8.9 rpg, 1.5 apgC — Kaleb Wesson — Freshman, 6-foot-9, 270 lbs., 12.3 ppg, 4.9 rpg, 0.8 apgScouting UNCOhio State has played a ranked opponent only once this season, and it was an 86-59 loss to now-No. 12 Gonzaga. The team it faces Saturday might be even better than that Bulldog squad. According to Kenpom.com, North Carolina is the No. 11 team in the nation, one spot ahead of Gonzaga. The Tar Heels have handled a few quality teams to this point, beating Stanford 96-72, Michigan 86-71 and No. 21 Tennessee 78-73. Ohio State head coach Chris Holtmann said in watching the film of those wins, it is clear North Carolina is a team that should be making a return trip to the Final Four in 2018.“There’s a reason they’re the No. 5 team in the country,” Holtmann said Thursday. “We’ve watched them play both home and away, they were up on Michigan by 30 with 10 minutes to go. They just can be really, really explosive. Obviously they have a terrific win at Tennessee. Every time you’re watching them play, you’re trying to evaluate things.”But while North Carolina has several big wins on its resume, it also has several standout losses. In its first real test of the season, it was beat down by now-No. 2 Michigan State 63-45, and lost to Wofford 79-75 Wednesday night. The Tar Heels tend to be one of the more dominant teams in the nation across the board, ranking as both a top-20 team by KenPom in both adjusted offensive efficiency (No. 14) and adjusted defensive efficiency (No. 19). But there is one area that could bode well for the Buckeyes. When Ohio State struggles, it is because it gets into turnover trouble. According to KenPom, Ohio State ranks No. 173 in offensive turnover rate. But the Tar Heels have not been a team to force many turnovers this season, ranking only 267th in defensive turnover rate. In North Carolina’s loss to Wofford, it forced just 10 turnovers and scored eight points off those turnovers. But that is one of the only matchups that looks favorable for the Buckeyes. The Tar Heels typically run a zone defense, a scheme that has caused Ohio State fits offensively all season.The Buckeyes also have not dealt with up-tempo teams well. The three teams that have beaten Ohio State — Gonzaga, Butler and Clemson — average just 16.8 seconds per offensive possession this season. The three Power Five teams Ohio State has beaten — Wisconsin, Michigan and Stanford — average 18.2 seconds per offensive possession. The Tar Heels are the seventh-fastest team in the nation on offense, taking just 14.4 seconds on every offensive possession. Ohio State forward Jae’Sean Tate said the team has spent extensive time at practice this week working on transition defense in anticipation for North Carolina’s faster offense.“The way they get the ball up the court so fast even on made-baskets, going to be key trying to make them play in the half-court is basically what we’re going to have to try to do,” Tate said.How will UNC rebound from its loss to Wofford?Both Ohio State and North Carolina wrapped up relatively easy nonconference stretches of their schedules before the upcoming trip to New Orleans. But unlike Ohio State, North Carolina could not handle its business against Wofford, losing 79-75.Wofford shot 43.8 percent from the field and 31.8 percent from beyond the arc overall, but was exceptional in the second half. The Terriers shot 50 percent (17-for-34) from the field, while also maintaining a 40 percent 3-point success rate with 6-of-15 makes. The Tar Heels, by comparison, shot only 36.4 percent from the field and 28 percent from 3-point range during the game. North Carolina, not known to be a 3-point shooting team, fell behind to Wofford and tried to make it all back up in bulk, but went just 5-for-16 from beyond the arc in the second half.The loss to a 25-point underdog could do one or two things to a team: it could serve as sufficient motivation to play as hard as possible the next time out or it could drag down morale. Holtmann and the Buckeyes are preparing for the former, reflecting on how the Tar Heels responded to its first loss of the season to Michigan State.“After they came back from getting beat by Michigan State, they were phenomenal against Michigan and it was incredible. Like I said, up 30 midway through the second half. I think any time you have a veteran team, that’s typically what happens,” Holtmann said. “You look at it, you say, ‘Absolutely, I’m pretty confident that we’re going to get their very best.’”Prediction:UNC wins 76-68 read more


26 wonderful photos of terrified Irish lads in a haunted house

first_img14. 15.16.17.18. 19.20.21. 22.23.24.25. 26. And this guy.All photos courtesy of The Nightmare Realm. For more information, visit their website or like them on Facebook.Which is your favourite and why? Let us know in the comments…More: The 17 best photos from The Nightmare Realm 2012>13 hilarious pictures of people getting terrible frights> THESE PHOTOS SHOW some top-drawer Irish lads going through The Nightmare Realm haunted house in Cork.Terror: not just for girls.1.2.3.4.5.6.7.8. 9.10. 11. 12. 13. last_img


Woman airlifted from Kerry mountain in atrocious Stephens Day conditions

first_imgTHE DINGLE COAST Guard Unit and the Shannon Rescue 115 helicopter crew carried out a daring rescue operation on the side of Mount Brandon amid what were described as “atrocious” conditions yesterday.The Ambulance Service received a report of a woman with a broken leg on the side of the 3,127 foot Dingle Peninsula peak at around 2.50pm yesterday.The local Coast Guard unit were tasked to the scene, and managed to locate the walker at a position not far above a car park.As the spot was difficult to access from the road, a decision was made to call out Rescue 115.“Initially, it looked like the helicopter wasn’t going to make it up — the conditions were just so bad,” an operator at the Valentia Marine Rescue Sub Station told TheJournal.ie.“It turned out the position was low enough that it they could fly in below the cloud level.“It was still pretty windy though — the winch-man would have been fairly blown about the place.”The woman flown to Tralee General Hospital for treatment to the broken leg — touching down at 4.24pm.The helicopter pilot recorded wind speeds of 45 knots (around 80 kph) in the course of the rescue, the operator at Valentia said.Mount Brandon is the highest peak on the Dingle Peninsula [Image: Google Maps]Stormy conditions have been sweeping the country since early yesterday afternoon — the weather’s been described as the ‘worst storm in 15 years‘ and around 70,000 people have been left without power this morning as a result.Read: 70,000 people without power after ‘worst storm in 15 years’Read: Travel disruption as high winds continuelast_img read more


Dublin man who used Darknet to download 300 child abuse images avoids

first_img Image: Shutterstock/Iurii Stepanov 38,209 Views Image: Shutterstock/Iurii Stepanov http://jrnl.ie/3311338 Mar 28th 2017, 4:30 PM Tuesday 28 Mar 2017, 4:30 PM 100 Comments Share36 Tweet Email Tweet thisShare on FacebookEmail this article Short URL Dublin man who used Darknet to download 300 child abuse images avoids jail The judge said that while it was an “odious crime” the number of images was not high relative to other cases. AN IT EXPERT who began to trawl the Darknet for child pornography websites has avoided a jail term after he downloaded over 300 images.Richard Coghlan (37) had recently lost his job and was sleeping all day and accessing these websites at night. He later told gardaí he went “into a hollow”.Detective Garda Kieran Murphy told Dublin Circuit Criminal Court that the Garda Computer Crime Investigation Unit had such a backlog of cases in 2010 that he didn’t receive any results until November 2015.Murphy told Dara Hayes BL, prosecuting, that in August 2010 Interpol provided gardaí with an IP address that officers suspected had downloaded child pornography.The address was traced back to Coghlan and when gardaí arrived at his Dublin home to search it a month later, he immediately handed over two laptops.It took five years for the two machines to be forensically analysed but in the meantime Coghlan came voluntarily to the station and admitted that images of child pornography would be found.Coghlan of Glenbrea Court, Shankill, Dublin pleaded guilty at Dublin Circuit Criminal Court to possession of 325 images on his computers on September 21, 2010. He has no previous convictions.Murphy said of the 325 images found, 52 fell into the lowest category of seriousness, 175 were in the second lowest category and 98 fell into the second highest category.There were also a number of movie files that fell into those categories.Murphy said Coghlan had also visited a number of known child pornographic websites after doing a search on the Darknet for “girls of a young age, 5 yo to 12 yo – penetration”.Suspended sentenceJudge Martin Nolan sentenced Coghlan to two and half years in prison which he suspended in full on strict conditions.He said he had based his sentencing on previous child pornographic case law which concluded that in incidences of a low number of images and when an accused had no previous convictions, a suspended sentence should be handed down.Judge Nolan said that just over 300 images was not a high number in comparison to cases that had previously come before him when people have been caught with thousands and sometimes tens of thousands of images.“It’s an odious crime to have committed and he should be ashamed of himself. I’ve no doubt that people who know him, think less of him now,” the judge commented before he added that Coghlan was an intelligent man and a man of ability.He also accepted that in the seven years since Coghlan was caught he had not re-offended.Detective Garda Murphy agreed with James McCullough BL, defending, that his client “never sought to take advantage of the delay” in analysing his computers and made admissions before the results came back.He accepted that Coghlan “doesn’t seem to be a person at risk of future offending”.McCullough said that Coghlan had come to realise himself “in a real way that this is not a victimless crime and that young children are hurt”.“He carries the shame of these activities,” counsel continued before he submitted that Coghlan would benefit from psychotherapy.Read: Law lecturer convicted of possessing child pornography loses latest legal challenge >Read: Man accused of having images of child sex abuse told to stay away from all children > By Sonya McCleanlast_img read more


Bear Grylls Stars in Netflixs Next Interactive Adventure

first_imgStay on target Every choice matters when you’re steering adventurer Bear Grylls through the wilderness.On April 10, Netflix users will be able to make key decisions to help the British TV presenter “survive, thrive, and complete missions in the harshest environments on Earth.”Interactive series You vs. Wild invites viewers to live vicariously through Grylls by choosing the course of his story in each of the eight episodes.“I’m so proud to deliver this first-of-its-kind live-action interactive series, really giving viewers an all-access pass to explore the world and its landscapes in my boots,” Grylls said in a statement, published by Variety. “The stakes are high in this one.” For the first time, my survival is in your hands and the stakes have never been this high. Answer the call, if you’re up for the challenge. #YOUvsWILDhttps://t.co/ANyJbOoi5a— Bear Grylls (@BearGrylls) March 18, 2019Little else is known about the upcoming show, announced by Cindy Holland, vice president of original series, during a Monday press event.The news comes just days after Variety teased more interactive storytelling from the streaming platform.“We’re doubling down on that,” Todd Yellin, vice president of product at Netflix, said at last week’s media and entertainment conference FICCI-Frames in Mumbai.“It’s a huge hit here in India, it’s a huge hit around the world,” he said in a keynote speech. “We realized, ‘Wow, interactive storytelling is something we want to bet more on.’”And quickly, it seems.Netflix tested the waters in 2017 with children’s programs like Puss in Book: Trapped in an Epic Tale and Buddy Thunderstruck: The Maybe Pie.But it wasn’t until December’s hit psychological thriller Bandersnatch—a choose-your-own-adventure experience for the digital age—that the company struck gold among adults.“It’s still in the evaluation and growing stage,” Holland said.Tune in next month to see what mishaps you can get Bear Grylls into. The family-friendly show promises to be “exciting,” according to Netflix.More on Geek.com:New Netflix Horror Series ‘Black Summer’ Unveils Zombie ChaosNetflix Pulls Real-Life Rail Tragedy Clips From ‘Bird Box’Netflix Claps Back at Steven Spielberg’s Push to Ban It From Oscarscenter_img What to Stream on Netflix This WeekendZach Galifianakis Hits the Road in ‘Between Two Ferns: The Movie’ Trailer last_img read more


Rush Street declares intention to bid for Japanese IR in Hokkaido

first_imgUS-based real estate developer and regional casino operator Rush Street has officially declared its intention to bid for a Japan IR license in Hokkaido.The company announced this week that it has now opened its first office in Tomakomai under the name Rush Street Japan, stating that it aims to work with the city and engage with the local business community and residents to develop an IR proposal that “serves the needs of all stakeholders, including domestic and international customers, employees and the broader community at large.” Osaka approves Yumeshima site for commercial development in latest IR move Suncity Group, Bloomberry Resorts unveil Wakayama IR visions Load More Rush Street added that its on-the-ground presence will help it create a locally relevant IR.“Japan is an extremely exciting market for us,” said Rush Street’s co-founder and Chairman, Neil Bluhm.“We have deliberately delayed our entrance to the Asian markets until we could be sure we could create something that truly aligns to our own vision and values. We bring an expertise and strong track record in establishing sustainable facilities that benefit our host communities through a focus on inclusivity and partnership. Building an IR of this kind in Hokkaido not only will transform the region from an economic standpoint, it will put Hokkaido on the map as a global travel destination.”Rush Street CFO Tim Drehkoff added that Rush Street sees Japan as a long-term strategy but that “it cannot be viewed as a one size fits all. What works in Hokkaido is very different to what might work in other prefectures. We have spent a lot of time in Japan in recent years, and in Hokkaido in particular, listening to the views of the local communities and the officials within who will act as host to these IRs. It is clear to us that building a resort which operates as part of the community is critical. Working with our team in Japan, we are committed to delivering a resort that will create a lasting impact.”In an exclusive interview with Inside Asian Gaming this week, Bluhm revealed that Rush Street was focusing entirely on Hokkaido which he said better aligns with the company’s vision as opposed to other potential regional IR locations.“Doing something in Tomakomai, Hokkaido fits right into what we do so that’s why we’ve set our sights on Hokkaido and Tomakomai,” he said.“Our only interest right now is Tomakomai. We’re putting all of our efforts there. Somebody asked me, ‘What would happen if Hokkaido decided they didn’t want an integrated resort?’“Well if that were the case we’d have ot reconsider some other locations but right now we’re just focusing on Tomakomai.”Based in Chicago, Rush Street was founded in the early 1990s as a real estate development firm but has since established itself as a leading developer and operator of regional casinos in the United States with properties in Chicago, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia and New York State among other locations. RelatedPosts Suncity Group looking to develop new resort hotel in Okinawa, Japan after US$10 million land purchaselast_img read more


Amazon Minnesota warehouse workers planning Prime Day strike

first_img 17 Photos For these women, working at Amazon while pregnant ends… While the strike is unlikely to impact Amazon’s operations, it should continue to highlight persistent and ongoing concerns about its treatment of warehouse workers. Unions and advocacy groups have long contended that the company overworks employees and sets up a hostile working environment. Amazon has often responded by pointing to its move last year to raise its wages to $15 an hour, and saying it provides safe working conditions.”The fact is Amazon offers already what this outside organization is asking for,” Amazon said in a statement Monday, highlighting its pay and benefits package, which includes paid education, parental leave and promotional opportunities. “We encourage anyone to compare our pay, benefits, and workplace to other retailers and major employers in the Shakopee community and across the country – and we invite anyone to see for themselves by taking a tour of the facility.”While European Amazon workers have routinely gone on strikes during big sales days, including Prime Day and Black Friday, these types of strikes aren’t common in the US, where no Amazon workers are unionized and union protections aren’t as strong.In the past year, Amazon has faced repeated criticism for its warehouse conditions. Last month, for instance, US Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a regular critic of the company, said that Amazon pays its workers “starvation wages.” Amazon responded by saying that her assertion was “just wrong.” Last year, US Senator Bernie Sanders continually attacked Amazon, too, but then congratulated the company for raising its minimum wage to $15. 4 Not everyone’s smiling at Amazon warehouses. John MacDougall/AFP/Getty Images Just as Amazon is finalizing plans for its big Prime Day summer sale next week, the company is facing more labor problems in its Minneapolis-area warehouses.Workers at its Shakopee, Minnesota, fulfillment center are planning a six-hour strike during Prime Day to push for better working conditions and worker protections, Bloomberg reported Monday.Amazon warehouse workers in the Twin Cities region have been especially vocal in their efforts to raise labor concerns, with these efforts powered by East African Muslim employees and the local Awood Center, a worker advocacy organization. Employees there have already pushing Amazon’s managers to negotiate over firings and worker complaints. In May, three Somali Muslim workers filed charges with the federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, claiming Amazon failed to accommodate their religious needs and retaliated against their protests. 1:56 Comments Now playing: Watch this:center_img Amazon Prime Day Tags This Amazon site handles your biggest, bulkiest purchases Share your voice Internet Amazon Prime Amazonlast_img read more


ShopClues cofounder Sandeep Aggarwal accuses wife Radhika of illicit affair with colleague

first_imgAn exterior view of the office of Shopclues.com, an online marketplace, is pictured in Gurugram, January 19, 2016.Reuters fileOnline marketplace ShopClues is in the news for all the wrong reasons: Two co-founders of the six-year-old Gurugram-based start-up, Sandeep Aggarwal and his wife Radhika, are engaged in an ugly spat that also involves the third co-founder, Sanjay Sethi.In a Facebook post on Sunday (March 12) laden with frustration, ridicule and anger, Sandeep lashed out at his wife, and accused her, among other things, of having an “illicit affair” with Sanjay Sethi and usurping powers.”…illicit love affair with once own boss while husband is away dealing with biggest family crisis…intentionally and deliberately kicking out other founding team members by collaborating with once illicit love affair partner.”The reference “while husband is away” apparently refers to Sandeep working in the US in 2011, the year he started ShopClues. However, things turned sour for him as he was accused of insider trading in 2013 while working as an analyst with an investment bank.  The post titled “Things people do to be famous and faking to be way too cooler than they actually are!!! Here are some examples:” also accused Radhika of usurping power and depriving him of voting rights in the firm.”fraudulently changing once husband, mentor, best friend and guide’s voting rights,” read one of the 12 accusations against her, which she has rebutted in a statement.”I am shocked by unfounded and baseless allegations being made. In the interest of privacy of my family, I will not be commenting on any personal matters, however, ShopClues was always a team effort and it has become a force to reckon with. I want to focus my time and energy to do what I owe to my employees, my investors, my country and myself,” the Times of India quoted Radhika as saying.An update on Tracxn says that ShopClues has raised $231 million from investors that include Nexus Venture Partners, Tiger Global Management, Singapore government’s GIC and Helion Venture Partners.A profile update of ShopClues issued in January this year said that the start-up has 1,000 employees and is the Indian subsidiary of Clues Network Inc. In addition to ShopClues, Sandeep also co-founded Droom, an online marketplace to buy and sell used automobiles, in 2014. The start-up has raised $45 million from investors that include Digital Garage, Beenos and Lightbox Ventures.Radhika Aggarwal, Co-founder, ShopCluesFrom Linkedin profileHere is the full text of Sandeep’s post on Facebook:Things people do to be famous and faking to be way too cooler than they actually are!!! Here are some examples:1) Entry level business analyst job with 18 months of work experience + 12 months of long term disability and seeing your junior becoming your boss = quality work experience in a famous retailer in USA2) 2-3 hour long classes and $550 in total fee = a degree from Stanford3) 8 weeks in a famous investment bank in their least prestigious sales department as an intern = rich Wall Street experience in New York City4) Coming to India with your kids for summer break and living with once parents = starting India office5) Reluctantly assisting your husband and not knowing how, when and where to assist = self proclaimed founder of a billion dollar company6) fraudulently changing once husband, mentor, best friend and guide’s voting rights = honest and simple person7) illicit love affair with once own boss while husband is away dealing with biggest family crisis = pure, dedicated and supportive wife8) 18 months of business analyst job, two 3-4 months long attempts due to guidance and monetary support from husband, staying home for 9 years = 14 years of rich and illustrious work experience9) stay home mom for 6 years and prior to that only 18 months as entry level business analyst and straight away getting VP job from once husband = Merit, hard work, exemplary leadership and dedicated career10) Title of VP but husband doing all the work = smart, intelligent and highly accomplished individual11) intentionally and deliberately kicking out other founding team members by collaborating with once illicit love affair partner = calling them founders now12). Changing web history, tempering with Wikipedia and lying in the press = my illicit love affair partner and I founded the company and my husband also joined the companyThese are the lies, gross exaggerations and cheap attempts to mislead the whole world, yourself and generations to come!!Sick and tired of people being SO greedy and useless!!!But guess, these people are not worth it…stay positive and try and not look back.But come on world, do not have double standards!! Sanjay Sethi, CEO, ShopCluesSpecial arrangementlast_img read more


AL still worried about nonpolitical but popular demo

first_imgBangladesh Awami League LogoStunned by the popular outbursts over non-political issues in recent times, ruling Bangladesh Awami League (AL) is apprehensive of similar movement ahead of the next general elections.Party insiders think agitation by non-political elements has attained popular support since they understand the demands are logical.Social media networks have played a key role in shaping public opinions while, the AL leaders say, the anti-government forces have tried to take full advantage of the situation.Some of them have admitted that the government had to take unpopular steps of using coercion, arresting some and controlling the social media networks in order to quell the demonstration.AL presidium member Faruk Khan claimed, “The BNP-Jamaat alliance has made conspiracy and mixed politics with students’ demonstration to make it violent. It may try to do the same ahead of national elections. But the government and the Awami League are cautious of such moves.”The AL government was shaken by the recent demonstration by the students for safe roads following deaths of two students in road crash on Airport Road in Dhaka. Jobseekers had earlier launched a movement demanding reform in the quota system in the public services.However, the government and the ruling party policymakers feel they have managed to tackle the students’ demonstrations for safe roads and quota reform for the time being.Readymade garment (RMG) workers may take to the streets demanding pay hike, ahead of the elections, AL leaders fear.Also, teachers’ demand for inclusion in the government’s pay-roll called MPO (monthly pay order) is yet to be settled and they may in the coming days try to mount pressure on the government for accepting their demands.The AL alliance leaders, at a meeting of the 14-party alliance at the Workers’ Party office on Thursday, asked the government to be cautious and accept the logical demands.The Bangladesh Nationalist Party (BNP) could not put up any resistance – neither in parliament nor on the streets -after the AL-led grand alliance had assumed office in 2009.The BNP had instead suffered criticism at home and abroad as its movement for holding the polls under a neutral government turned violent before and after 5 January 2014 elections.Despite jailing of BNP chairperson Khaleda Zia in a graft case in February this year, the BNP could not launch any agitation to free her.The government was comfortable in taking preparations for the next general elections, but it fell in trouble since the demonstration for quota reform began. And it was embarrassed again when the younger students took to the streets demanding safe road.In both the cases, the government was compelled to accept the ‘logical’ demands although the AL policymakers considered this gesture a tactical ploy.The students of private universities had earlier in 2015 launched a demonstration against imposition of value added tax (VAT). The government, however, backtracked on the move and as usual, the AL leaders called this a step to stop them there.AL policymakers believe the anti-government forces may launch a movement ahead of the national elections. So, they added, the AL has prepared its organisation in the name of election preparations to counter the demonstration. However, the party could not anticipate the movements by the students.The AL had secured support from the youth with the slogan for change during the 2008 elections. But, an AL central leader seeking anonymity said the younger generation has this time around challenged the government.“The Awami League will have to recalculate its strategy,” the leader pointed out.AL publicity and publication secretary Hasan Mahmud claimed that the youth are not annoyed with the government, rather “they are happy as their demands are met”.Some in the ruling camp say the opposition and some external forces have instigated the demonstration to embarrass the government and ensure its fall. So, they think, the protests have to be dealt with an iron hand.Some leaders, however, think both of the movements are absolutely non-political and the situation would not have reached such a height had the government immediately met the demands.AL policymakers said the government wants to reform the quota system and it wanted to do so after the next elections.Terming both the recent movements – for quota reform and safe road – as logical, Supreme Court lawyer Shahdeen Malik said the common people supported them and these demonstrations also embarrassed the government.Dwelling on the AL’s allegation of conspiracy about the movements, he said, “It’s a political statement and there is no basis of it.”*This report, originally published in print edition, has been rewritten in English by Rabiul Islam.last_img read more


VIDEO Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1

first_img Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 8:44Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -8:44 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button. Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Information Technology View all 220 items CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Find more SCCT news and videos Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Videos | Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imagingcenter_img Find more news and videos from AAPM. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Conference Coverage View all 396 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Women’s Health View all 62 items Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Recent Videos View all 606 items Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports View all 9 items Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicinelast_img read more


Theres more than sun and sand in Puerto Plata with Sunwing

first_img TORONTO — With Sunwing flights from 11 gateways across Canada, it’s never been easier for clients to vacation better in Puerto Plata.Lush mountaintops, breathtaking beaches and a rich history: Puerto Plata has all that and more and Canadians can look forward to unforgettable tropical adventures when they visit this D.R. favourite, says Sunwing. Whether travellers are seeking an adventurous getaway or a relaxing beach vacation, there’s something for everyone to enjoy in this popular D.R. destination.One of Puerto Plata’s main attractions is the teleferico – the only cable car in the Caribbean. Taking riders 800 metres above sea level to the top of Mount Isabel de Torres, it offers stunning panoramic views of the city, from the sparkling sea in the north to the lush forest landscapes in the south.Mount Isabel de TorresTravellers can explore the city and ride the teleferico on a Sunwing Experiences excursion where they can also visit historic sites like Fort San Felipe and the Amber Museum.More news:  Sunwing to further boost Mazatlán service with new flights from OttawaPuerto Plata vacationers will also enjoy perfect conditions for water sports including snorkelling, scuba diving and kite surfing. With kite surfing lessons available at multiple beaches such as Playa Blanca, Playa Dorada, Costa Dorada and Playa Sousa, travellers can gear up and cruise over the waves of the Atlantic Ocean. For the ultimate kite surfing experience, guests can visit Playa Cabarete, the Caribbean’s hub for kiteboarding and windsurfing. Thanks to Puerto Plata’s location, the shores of Playa Cabarete are protected and offer perfect conditions year-round for water sports with warm waters and steady eastern trade winds.Playa CabareteTravellers can also catch a glimpse of D.R. history with a visit to Fort San Felipe, dating back to the 16th century. Originally used as a military base, Fort San Felipe became a prison and is now a museum showcasing ancient weapons like the original canons used to safeguard the coast as well as numerous hidden chambers. Vacationers can explore this historic fort on a Sunwing Experiences excursion, where they can learn all about the island’s history, from its founding by the Spanish to its defences against attacks from pirates.More news:  Sunwing offers ultimate package deal ahead of YXU flights to SNU, PUJClients can take advantage of direct seasonal flights from Toronto and Montreal with award-winning inflight service onboard Sunwing Airlines, complimentary roundtrip airport transfers and the assistance of knowledgeable Sunwing Experiences representatives in destination. Travelweek Group Thursday, April 25, 2019 There’s more than sun and sand in Puerto Plata with Sunwing Posted bycenter_img Tags: Sunwing Share << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more


Music and migration The struggles of Ceshia Ubau

first_imgRelated posts:President Ortega celebrates anniversary; Costa Rica opens shelters Nicaraguan resistance group speaks out, refutes Nicaragua pointing finger at Costa Rica for attacks In San José, Nicaraguans march in memory and call for justice Nicaraguans gather in Costa Rica to celebrate release of political prisoners In exile, Ubau has been writing songs about the situation in Nicaragua, but she hasn’t released all of them in fear of endangering her relatives who remain in the northern country. However, months ago she premiered “Una Vela”, a song dedicated to all people killed by the Ortega dictatorship — which, according to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights, numbers at least 317 deaths.On Oct. 30, Ubau turned 21, away from her closest family and friends — and far from her country, which lives one of the worst human crises in its history. Here, the closest company she has is her guitar and her piano.The ideas continue to come for new songs that, one day, will tell us about Ubau’s struggles and our own. When Ceshia Ubau began her musical career in Nicaragua, she knew one day she would leave the country.She’d take advantage of the first opportunity, a scholarship or something that would help her reach new places that would inspire her. However, she never thought that moment would come under the fear of being killed by the Ortega dictatorship.The social art of Nicaraguan artists against Daniel Ortega’s regime has become a weapon against the dictatorship. At least two musicians have been imprisoned, and dozens of artists have left Nicaragua due to threats and persecution.Among them is Ubau, who at 20 years old emigrated to Costa Rica under the fear of the situation in her country. Using her music, she had participated in many of the protests against the Ortega government, putting her in danger.What started as a “tourist trip” to Costa Rica ended in the reality of not being able to return to her country.“I came (to Costa Rica) with a cousin for seven days,” Ubau said. “We, in fact, came as tourists. It was a trip arranged before the crisis. I remember that I took my piano and my guitar, thinking that just in case it was better to bring them on with me. Then I saw the Mother’s Day massacre and decided to stay.“I told my parents, and they understood.”‘Migration is never easy’Although the songwriter had always dreamed of leaving Nicaragua due to the lack of artistic opportunities in that country, it has not been easy to create a career in Costa Rica.“It’s always hard to start from scratch,” she said.But Ubau was not the first from her family to migrate. In the eighties, her father and brothers traveled to Costa Rica to avoid the ongoing war in Nicaragua. Ubau now lives with relatives who stayed in this country since. She didn’t know that part of the family well, but now they have become essential elements in her adaptation.She went from studying psychology and having an established place in the Nicaraguan musician scene, to being a stranger in a country that she also didn’t know.“It’s hard because you do not have contacts or know people,” she said. “Migrating is always hard because everything you know, doesn’t exist anymore. I try to see this as an opportunity to heal, to improve as a person.”Along the way, Ubau has met several people within the Costa Rican music scene. She has managed to present herself on several stages and plans to release her second album with the help of local producers.Musical inspirationsFor the young singer, “everything gives me inspiration.” The human, its faults and beauties, have been her “muse” since the beginning of her career three years ago.In “Con los Ojos del Alma,” her debut album, she speaks about depression, violence against women and human insecurities. She believes that music, rather than being just entertainment, is one of the most beautiful ways of communication.“My main goal with music is to contribute something to Nicaragua, Costa Rica and wherever I go,” she said. “I like to talk about those things that are not spoken. I like that people listen to what I have to say.”center_img Thank you for reading The Tico Times. We strive to keep you up to date about everything that’s been happening in Costa Rica. We work hard to keep our reporting independent and groundbreaking, but we need your help. The Tico Times is partly funded by you and every little bit helps. If all our readers chipped in a buck a month we’d be set for years. Support the Tico Times Facebook Commentslast_img read more