Horns aplenty

first_img ‘Headgear’ Tall, dark, and horned The spiraled horns of the red lechwe, shown here, are quite intimidating and also grow only on males. It’s a long reach from the almost-not-there horns of a giraffe to the massive antler spread of an adult moose. And that is outstripped by the largest-ever span of the extinct Irish elk — which is neither exclusively Irish nor an elk, for those keeping count.That contrivance could reach the rim of a basketball hoop from the ground. At 80 pounds, just imagine carting it around on your head.To help spur the imagination, the Harvard Museum of Natural History (HMNH) has mounted a new exhibit on horns and antlers that examines where they came from, what they’re used for, and their differences. “Headgear: The Natural History of Horns and Antlers” has opened in the museum’s special exhibit space and will run through Jan. 2.Hopi Hoekstra, Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences and curator in mammology in the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), said the exhibit was inspired by the MCZ’s extensive and diverse collection of horns and antlers, spurred somewhat by the impending move of the MCZ’s research collections into new space in the basement of the Northwest Laboratory building.Hoekstra said seeing the collection immediately raises questions that might not be asked if someone was examining less-visible features.“It raises natural questions: What’s the difference between horns and antlers? Why are some bigger? Do both sexes have them?” Hoekstra said. “One thing I love about this exhibit is you’re immediately struck by the diversity and you can’t help but wonder why. That’s what museums do, get people asking questions.”The exhibit, which tells its story through graphic panels and display cases, video, and the exhibit’s stars — animal heads on the walls — doesn’t leave the visitor hanging on the what, when, and why. Horns and antlers arose in a group of mammals called Artiodactyla, which evolved some 55 million years ago and includes deer, cows, moose, sheep, and goats.Though sometimes the words “horn” and “antler” are used interchangeably in everyday speech, they differ. Horns tend not to be branched, are retained year after year, and have a bony core covered by a sheath of hard material called “keratin” (the same substance that makes up our fingernails). Antlers, on the other hand, are usually branched, replaced each year, and made up just of bone, although they have a nourishing, fleshy coat called “velvet” while they grow.In some species, Hoekstra said, both males and females have horns or antlers, and in others just males do. These are mostly used by males in their battles for supremacy and the right to mate with nearby females, but they may also offer protection against predators.HMNH Executive Director Elisabeth Werby said the new exhibit is a good complement to the permanent exhibit on evolution, through which visitors pass to reach “Headgear.”“The number and diversity of specimens in this exhibition offer a new perspective on familiar creatures like deer and sheep and a rare look at some that are more exotic and strange. It’s a unique opportunity to contemplate the process of evolution,” Werby said. How they grow This skull of a Klipspringer, a small antelope, once belonged to a male; only they can grow horns, which can reach up to 6 inches. Wide load This diagram displays the actual size of an Irish elk’s antlers, which regularly surpass 6 feet in width. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer Answering questions Curator of Mammology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology Hopi Hoekstra said that museums get people asking questions — such as what’s the difference between horns and antlers? Come together These beetles, in a Harvard Museum of Natural History display case, show that little guys can have horns, too. Nature’s sculptures Here a selection of antlered specimens captivate and amaze with their strange beauty and variety. Raise your horns The African buffalo’s (bottom) horns curve downwards first, before growing skyward. Branching out Antlers like these are composed of bone — whereas horns are made from keratin, like fingernails. Antlers are typically branched, replaced every year, and have a nourishing, fleshy coat called “velvet” while they grow.last_img read more

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Students celebrate with Hesburgh

first_imgZahm House celebrated its 75th anniversary Sunday by honoring one of the few people on campus older than the dorm itself: 95-year-old University President Emeritus Fr. Theodore Hesburgh. The event began in the Hesburgh Library Auditorium with a reading of the “Hesburgh Challenge,” an agreement for all residents of Zahm House to live out Hesburgh’s legacy in their lives, and continued with an address from Hesburgh himself and a sharing of cigars near the Reflecting Pool. Zahm rector Scott Opperman said honoring Hesburgh was a great way to start off a historic year for the dorm. “The guys love him, and he means so much to Zahm and to the whole university,” Opperman said. “Zahm has stood up and said, ‘We want to carry on his legacy,’ and that’s a great way to celebrate our 75th anniversary … You could tell that he was touched. He even had a tear up there.” Opperman said he designed the contents of the “Hesburgh Challenge” to reflect Hesburgh’s priorities. “It’s things that Fr. Ted stands for, like service, sustainability, being inclusive,” he said. “The number-one thing was being inclusive and welcoming, and obviously that’s top on Fr. Hesburgh’s list.” To prioritize being inclusive, the men of Zahm agreed to respect themselves and others. The “Challenge” states, “We will never tolerate discrimination or hate-speech based on ability, age, class, color, ethnicity, gender, nationality, race, religion, sex, or sexual orientation.” Zahm’s residents pledged to end their “Ole, ole, ole” chant and will challenge others to do the same. The “Challenge” also emphasizes service and charity. “We shall dedicate ourselves to service,” the document states. “We will all participate in at least one House or University-sponsored service opportunity. We shall make larger donations to charity, especially through the profits of Za, our pizza parlor.” After the recitation of the Challenge, Hesburgh thanked the men of Zahm for honoring him and imparted words of advice. “Zahm has always been outstanding among the many halls at Notre Dame,” Hesburgh said. “Zahm always had, like the Germans call it, zeitgeist. They had a spirit, a kind of feeling and character, a kind of daring … I’m very lucky to be adopted as a part of the family by Zahm.” Hesburgh said students should have the courage to be themselves and disagree with each other, even if that means questioning the status quo. “Don’t be afraid to disagree,” he said. “I think one of the greatest values of an intelligent life is to disagree. At this point in your life, you’re deciding how to come down on things, tough things like sex or tough things like honesty or tough things like intelligence or tough things like being able to stand up in front of the crowd and say, ‘I don’t believe that and here are my reasons why.’ … That’s one reason I’m very proud of you guys, that you can stand up and say what you think.” In addition to giving advice, Hesburgh recounted a story of one of his most interesting experiences, which involved saying Mass at the South Pole. A Notre Dame graduate who had been assigned to take command of a group of researchers there asked Hesburgh to bless his mission remotely, but Hesburgh said he decided to do it in person instead. “That day was the first Mass at sea on an icebreaker and the second Mass at the South Pole,” he said. Even after traveling the world, Hesburgh said Notre Dame is still the closest place to his heart. “Notre Dame is the best Catholic university, not just in the world today, but ever,” he said. Hesburgh said he prays for all Notre Dame students daily and is confident the residents of Zahm in particular will lead extraordinary lives. After his speech, the men of Zahm dubbed Hesburgh an “honorary Zahmbie,” gifting him with a dorm t-shirt, water bottle, bumper sticker and key to the residence hall. Freshman Christian Metzler said meeting Hesburgh was a special moment for him. “Fr. Hesburgh is a legend here at Notre Dame, and you hear great things about him all the time, and the fact that we were able to get to meet him and [make him] an honorary Zahmbie really means a lot, even as a freshman,” Metzler said. “I’m blessed that we had this opportunity to meet him and hear what he had to say. We could’ve listened to him for hours.” Junior John Brahier said Hesburgh’s speech was incredibly powerful. “The words of wisdom he was able to share with us will definitely be in our hearts for a long time,” Brahier said. “They will definitely inspire us to do bigger and better things in the coming years, and we’re really excited about that future.” Senior Peter Flores said the experience of smoking cigars with Hesburgh is unforgettable. “Fr. Ted is known for smoking a cigar or two, and there’s no greater bonding experience among men than smoking a cigar with a guy you look up to,” Flores said. Metzler said he looks forward to the positive results that will come of the “Hesburgh Challenge.” “We’re really looking to become more inclusive,” Metzler said. “It’s a huge thing, especially at a Catholic university, to accept everyone, and in a residence system where it’s all random. Even if you don’t have the same views as someone, respect what their views are and teach them about your views and learn from other people.” Senior Zahm resident assistant Luke Peters said he would take the “Hesburgh Challenge” very seriously. “I hope to live out the ‘Hesburgh Challenge’ by taking it upon myself to take the extra effort to stand for what Fr. Hesburgh did in his life, with that same spirit of inclusion, strong morals and character which he was able to carry out through his time at the University and what he still stands for today,” Peters said. Flores, also a resident assistant, said he hopes the “Hesburgh Challenge” will foster a familial atmosphere in Zahm. “Families don’t always get along,” Flores said. “Families aren’t always on the same page. But families love each other and stick with each other. That’s the real challenge, to make the Notre Dame family … alive.” Contact Tori Roeck at vroeck@nd.edulast_img read more

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The place needed us’

first_imgIn 1972, there were 325. In 2013, there are more than 4,000. When the University first included women in its undergraduate student body in 1972, female students were an extreme minority, a small contingent among more than 5,000 male peers. As Notre Dame marks the 40th anniversary of coeducation this academic year, women represent 48 percent of the student body. In 1972, women’s dorms still had urinals from converted men’s dorms, and female students didn’t feel comfortable eating in the dining hall alone. But as the population of women has grown and bucked early stereotypes, the conversations surrounding gender relations here not ended. If anything, they have become more relevant to the campus climate at Notre Dame.   Sisterhood and brotherhood It’s the first weekend on campus, and freshmen jump into school traditions and dorm life. Girls’ dorms serenade boys’ dorms. Boys escort girls to brother-sister dorm events. But for senior Lauren Palomino, orientation at Notre Dame had “a weird dynamic.” “We’re doing these serenades … [and] in the time a boy takes a knee and you sing back to him, you’re not going to build a solid friendship that lasts from that,” Palomino said. Senior Pat Rice participated in Frosh-O four years ago as a new member of Alumni Hall. This year, he helped lead orientation as an RA. For Rice, freshman orientation is a change to introduce incoming students to the University. Dorm events and traditions aren’t gender-biased institutions – they are ways to help young men and women begin to interact with each other on a college campus. “For me personally, Frosh-O was just a ‘Welcome to Notre Dame’ experience,” Rice said. “I never felt awkward, I never felt intimidated. … If nothing else, serenading and walking girls over to dances gives you something to talk about at the end of the night. You talk about Domerfest, you talk about what song you sang to the ladies. “I don’t think there’s anything [awkward] inherently. Frosh-O isn’t supposed to be your entire college experience. It’s supposed to be ‘Welcome to Notre Dame.’ Let’s get out there.” Orientation introduces students to the residence life structure at Notre Dame – 29 single-sex residence halls, divided into 15 male dorms and 14 female dorms. “I think same-sex dorms are a strong foundational principal,” Rice said. “It’s what Notre Dame is founded on, creating sisterhood and brotherhood. A lot of bonding goes on after parietals. It’s always good to interact with the opposite sex, but you would never have the frank, open dialogue you might have [after parietals] if girls were around.” For Palomino, parietals can sometimes stunt friendships between male and female students. A date might be worth the risk of evading hall staff post-parietals for students, she said, but just hanging out with a friend might not be enough incentive for breaking the rules. “Parietals aren’t going to stop you from doing any shenanigans you’re going to. … Parietals are going to stop you from watching a movie because spending a night in your [opposite sex] best friend’s dorm, it’s not worth the last 20 minutes of ‘Forgetting Sarah Marshall,’” she said. “For me, it just limits friendships with the opposite sex.” Senior Shannon Warchol, also an RA in Welsh Family Hall, said the Frosh-O experience and single-sex dorms don’t necessarily stunt friendships – they just make the process of meeting the opposite sex more “formal” than at other schools. “I was raised like you don’t invite yourself to somebody else’s house, you wait until they invite you or whatever,” Warchol said. “So I would never go into a boys’ dorm and just walk around and see who was there. But if I lived in a co-gender dorm where they lived down the hall or on the next floor, I would just walk past and see whose door was open and I wouldn’t feel like I was inviting myself over to their house. “So I think that makes it more difficult freshman year because it makes it so formal, you have to always be inviting someone over. You can’t just build a friendship because you’re there [in the same dorms.] Now I don’t see it as much of a problem.” A classroom dynamic Warchol decided to pursue civil engineering when she was a high school student living in Minneapolis. When a major bridge collapsed in the city, she witnessed the massive problem-solving effort to revamp transportation in the large metropolis and then build a safer bridge. She’ll head to graduate school in May and then enter a male-dominated engineering field. At her summer internship, only nine of the 40 people in her office were women. But at Notre Dame, she hasn’t felt that same male monopoly, even though her department has enrolled more men than women. “I almost felt like I was going to have to come in and work harder, work 10 times as hard as the male students, to prove that when I received special recognition, it wasn’t just because I was a female student,” Warchol said. “You don’t want to be recognized because you’re different. You want to be recognized because you do superior work. “But there’s never been a problem with thinking I was receiving special treatment or different treatment because I was a female at Notre Dame. So maybe it’s prepared me to expect the best out of people.” While her parents’ generation has populated the engineering field with more men, Warchol said she didn’t expect that trend to continue as her own generation graduates from school. “You always hear this talk of people, especially in our parents’ generation or older, how they talk about industry in engineering being so segregated still and there’s such a high proportion of men,” she said. “Which doesn’t really mesh with what you see at the university level.” ‘A transitional moment’ Even in the 15 years since Dr. Susan Ohmer, professor in the Department of Film, Television and Theatre, arrived at Notre Dame in 1998, she has noticed a change in the percentage of women faculty at the University. “I can see a difference. … In the time I’ve been here, there seems to be more openness about children, about talking about children, about thinking about work-family balance,” Ohmer said. “These are issues that people feel comfortable bringing up now.” As the female population of professors and students continues to grow, Ohmer chairs the University Committee on Women’s Faculty and Students. The committee began in the early 1990s and reports to University President Fr. John Jenkins through the provost of the University. The purpose of the committee is to “consider policies, practices and the general environment of the University as they relate to women faculty and students,” according to Notre Dame’s Academic Articles. The committee has 22 elected members from across the University, including 20 women and two men. “I think that it’s a very important committee for bringing women faculty together to talk about issues that affect us as a group. … I think the committee feels empowered,” she said. Currently, the full-time teaching faculty at Notre Dame breaks down to about 70 percent men and 30 percent women, Ohmer said, but she expects that demographic to shift as long-standing male professors retire. “Over the past two years, we’ve had a number of key people involved in diversity initiatives, and Fr. John has defined diversity to include people of color as well as gender,” Ohmer said. Some of these people, however, have moved on from Notre Dame to other institutions, Ohmer said, citing vice president and associate provost Don Pope-Davis’ recent decision to move to DePaul University. “I hope there continues to be an effort to address issues of gender and diversity [in key positions,]” Ohmer said. “We are really in a transitional moment and I hope we don’t lose the momentum we have.” As a high-ranking administrator, University chief of staff Ann Firth has also served in a number of positions involved with women at Notre Dame, and she was instrumental in beginning the Gender Relations Center (GRC). But when she first arrived on campus as an undergraduate in 1977, only 25 percent of the student body was female.   “There were occasions when I was the only woman or perhaps one of very few in a class, and we were certainly outnumbered in the dining halls,” she said. “But this didn’t really detract from my sense of belonging and connection. … I guess I felt on some level like the place needed us, that having women here was part of an important and necessary evolution for Notre Dame.” As the presence of women has grown at Notre Dame and Firth has climbed in the administration, she said.”A mentor gave me some very simple but profound advice when I was first embarking on my professional career – to always remember who I am,” she said. “In some ways, that’s harder than it sounds, and while hardly unique to one gender, I think it can be a particular struggle for women. “One of the things I have most appreciated about my career at Notre Dame is that I have found it possible to be myself here, which among other things means that I can bring my perspective as a woman to bear on the work I do.” ‘What is the stereotype?’ Before there were Notre Dame women, there were Saint Mary’s women. Holy Cross sisters established the College as an all-female institution just two years after Holy Cross brothers established Notre Dame in 1842. Now, Saint Mary’s is one of the premier women’s colleges in the nation. But at one point, Saint Mary’s almost stopped existing. In the late 1960s and the early 1970s, Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s discussed merging their two universities. Talks fell through for financial and institutional reasons, and Saint Mary’s remains its own university today. Saint Mary’s senior Ciara O’Halloran has participated in science classes at Notre Dame, taking advantage of the co-exchange program that still exists between the two schools. “Well, my classes at Notre Dame were a lot bigger, so I didn’t know my professors as well as I knew my professors at Saint Mary’s,” O’Halloran said. “I didn’t get to know as many classmates as I did at Saint Mary’s. “I guess the nice thing [at Saint Mary’s] was that I knew everybody in the class and I also probably took for granted in some respect that I had the professor for several classes.” O’Halloran said Notre Dame students were sometimes surprised to find her among their classmates. “For me, I would find people turn around and [say,] ‘You go to Saint Mary’s? You’re not like I imagined you.’ “I’m like, ‘What is the stereotype? What is the normal Saint Mary’s student?’” Notre Dame sophomore Erin Klosterman began her college career at Saint Mary’s, but she transferred to Notre Dame to pursue her dream – playing volleyball for Notre Dame.  Even as she has changed schools, however, she said she sees the difference between Notre Dame and Saint Mary’s as a positive one. “I definitely think an all-girls education is unique,” Klosterman said. “I think it provides an excellent environment for learning as well as making friendships, and I think it really just allows the girls to go and really feed off each one another in an academic environment without having to worry about a lot of other things.” As she moved from Saint Mary’s to Notre Dame, Klosterman said she really appreciated the environment of a same-sex dorm, so similar to her experience at an all-girls high school and at the College. And when she tells Notre Dame students she has transferred from Saint Mary’s, she said she hasn’t experienced any kind of discrimination. “I think a lot of people hear about the stereotypes but their actions are based solely on the fact that they’ve heard about a stereotype but not necessarily that they’ve had a negative experience with a Saint Mary’s girl.” Loyal daughters This weekend, Palomino will direct this year’s “Loyal Daughters and Sons,” a student-run production that focuses on true stories of sexual violence and gender. The production is meant to open dialogue about sexuality, sex and its complexities on a campus like Notre Dame’s – one she said does not do the best job of opening itself to those conversations. “If you can’t talk about sexuality, how do you talk about bad sexuality, about [good sexuality]?” she said. “How do you determine the difference is there? If all sexuality is bad, if all sex is bad, then what’s the difference between sexual assault and consensual sex?’ “It needs to be a safer place to talk [about] things.” But Notre Dame has also helped her consider aspects of her own gender and sexuality, that Palomino had not encountered before. “I’ve dealt with a lot of gender issues that my friends haven’t at other schools,” she said. “Because I’m not Catholic, I’m at a Catholic school, I’m from the West Coast. It’s a different place. So I’ve thought about things a different way. No one anywhere else has to be curious about whether they can get their birth control pills filled. No one anywhere else wonders if it’s okay to buy condoms. And so I’ve thought about things. And that has helped me to really understand why I believe what I believe, where other people haven’t had to think about that.” As productions like “Loyal Daughters and Sons” continue, as men and women at Notre Dame continue to learn together, Palomino said she hopes the student body continues to learn to talk together as well. “I hope it continues to be a conversation,” she said.last_img read more

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Student government initiates ‘coffee hours’ program

first_imgNotre Dame’s student government has started a new initiative this semester called “Coffee Hours” in which students can invite their professors to Starbucks and the Student Government will pay for their coffee.Student body president Lauren Vidal said this initiative was on her mind even before she was elected for the 2014-2015 term.“When Matt and I ran for office, we included an idea for ‘happy hours’ with professors and coffee,” Vidal said. “We truly value the out-of-classroom experience and conversation between students and faculty, and we wanted to find an active and meaningful way to encourage just that.”Coffee hours will not take the place of already existing office hours; however, coffee hours will provide a different and unique setting for students to ask teachers questions about course material or simply talk about their lives,” student government director of academic affairs Michelle Lacouture said.“Coffee hours and office hours can definitely coexist with one another,” Lacouture, who headed the initiative, said. “Coffee hours is a more intimate and relaxed meeting that you can schedule at a time that fits for you.”Coffee hours is also distinct from traditional office hours in that the conversation need not focus strictly on academics.“We hope that students use the meetings to continue working on language proficiency, discuss with their professor various internships, grow closer to their professor as a mentor,” Lacouture said. “… It’s an open conversation.”Vidal said she hopes the informal nature of coffee hours will appeal to students and make them more willing to meet outside of class with their professors.“It will give some structure to what students may otherwise be somewhat hesitate to initiate, especially as underclassmen,” Vidal said. “We also hope it will allow students capitalize on the knowledge that can be gained from one-on-one conversations with professors.”Lacouture said she hopes coffee hours will provide a new method for professors to mentor students outside of a classroom setting.“We talk a lot about mentoring, and we have lots of mentoring programs, but that’s not always super effective for everyone,” she said. “In coffee hours, the conversation is organic and can grow, connecting students and professors in a different matter than is already offered.”Students can sign up for coffee hours online at the Student Government website. Registering your coffee hours earns students a $10 voucher to Starbucks, which they can then pick up from the Student Government office on the second floor of LaFortune.“It takes the financial responsibility off of you and your professor, making it easier to invite them,” Lacouture said.Tags: coffee hours, Lauren Vidal, michelle lacouture, Notre Dame, Student governmentlast_img read more

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Long Island School Budgets Mostly Pass

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Long Island voters overwhelmingly voted Tuesday in favor of their school districts’ budgets by a margin of nearly 98 percent since almost all stayed under New York State’s 2-percent property tax cap.Voters in three districts that tried to exceed the limit—Bridgehampton, Sayville and West Babylon—failed to reach the 60 percent threshold required by state law and the Hempstead vote is reportedly being challenged for alleged irregularities. All across the Island, turnout was reportedly high, like in Syosset, where 70 percent of the district’s voters backed the proposed tax hike of 1.33 percent.Syosset School Board member Josh Lafazan called the increase “our lowest budget-to-budget increase in 20 years.” That also happens to be the same amount of years that the state’s youngest school board member has been alive.Now in his second year on the board, Lafazan plans to attend Cornell University this September as a junior transfer student from Nassau Community College. When he was first elected, he was still a senior at Syosset High School and told his constituents that he hoped to transfer to Columbia University, so he wouldn’t be so far away. Now, he plans to participate at all the board’s executive sessions via Skype and appear at every monthly school board meeting in person, unless an occasional test interferes.“I will continue to strive to help improve the school district and bring new ideas to the board for financial savings, even from a distance,” he told the community in a recent email. He plans to run for another three-year term next May.The community supported the budget Lafazan backed, but not enough of them apparently followed his recommendation that Bill Weiner replace incumbent Laura Schlesinger, who “comes from the old school board mentality of her predecessors,” Lafazan wrote. Weiner “came up short,” as Lafazan put it Wednesday morning after the final results were in.Before Lafazan ran for the school board, the district, which has 6,500 students, had achieved some unwanted statewide notoriety because its school superintendent, Carole Hankin, had the distinction of earning the second-highest salary for that job in the state. She got $506,000 in compensation, a sum that drew some criticism in 2011 from Gov. Andrew Cuomo for its exorbitance. After serving 23 years, Hankin retired last July and was replaced by Ronald L. Friedman, the former Great Neck schools superintendent, who agreed to fill in only for a year.This July, Thomas L. Rogers, the district superintendent of Nassau BOCES, will become Syosset’s new superintendent. Rogers will get $279,000 a year; his BOCES salary was reportedly $166,000, which is capped by the state at $166,762.U.S. News & World Report named Syosset High School a “gold medal school” and ranked it 32nd in New York, and 194th nationwide in its recent list of top American schools. It placed 184th nationwide in The Washington Post’s latest rankings.Lafazan had clashed with Hankin in his attempts to put the school budget online—it now is—and to promote more transparency. He had nothing but enthusiasm for Rogers.“He’s just a rock star when it comes to the issues,” Lafazan said. “We’re in very capable hands.”As for the rest of LI, homeowners can expect an average property-tax levy increase of only 1.57 percent, and, if they qualify, they won’t feel any pain because they’ll receive tax-rebate checks set to be in the mail right before the governor runs for re-election in November.last_img read more

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Experience pushes top performance

first_imgMany runners sign up for a race to motivate themselves to train harder. Musicians, too, reach their pinnacle when they perform for an audience. And perhaps credit union leaders give their latest project a special push when they are called on to present it to others.I’m thinking about this because I had the pleasure of hearing Jimese Harkley give her 2015 CUES Next Top Credit Union Exec final presentation last month. Harkley is philanthropy and community relations manager for $1.3 billion America’s First Federal Credit Union, Birmingham, Ala. At 35, she has led the CU to build a remarkable and successful strategy for its charitable donations.“I’m probably a hindrance to my CEO because I see the social side of this,” Harkley said lightheartedly during her talk at CEO/Executive Team Network. “Oh, it’s so fun. We should do this and this and this. But I had to stop and think, and this contest is what made me do that: ‘What’s the business case for why you have to have a strong strategy for your philanthropy?’”In her time on stage, Harkley acknowledged that November is a time of budgeting for many credit unions and recognized that many executives would be thinking about things like “not enough non-interest income” and “another EMV conversion” and “whether to budget that technology purchase.” She explained that her CU’s strong philanthropy strategy fits in with budget thinking because it engages employees and members to raise the money that’s given away—and then structures giving in a way that benefits both the CU and its community.Like Harkley’s, the initiatives and projects of all five CUES Next Top Credit Union Exec finalists were very impressive, significant and impactful. It’s clear the executives who lead these young contestants know that if you want to attract, develop and retain talent, you need to provide significant responsibility and relevant experiences to develop their skills and expertise.The experience of participating in the CUES Next Top Credit Union Exec contest has also helped emerging credit union leaders progress in their careers, making it a wonderful fit with CUES’ mission. Many who have taken part have moved on to roles with more responsibility in the CU movement—and almost 85 percent of them have stayed within the industry.Last year’s winner summed up the impact of his experience like this: “Being named the winner has given me a huge boost, both personally and professionally,” said Alex Castley, talent acquisition and development manager at $1.3 billion Integris Credit Union, Prince George, British Columbia. “It validated the work we are doing at my credit union, and gave a shot of confidence to all of us.”Each year the challenge gets better. There are more nominations, more participation in the voting, and better and better projects and presentations. All the facets of the effort show that giving young leaders responsibility and the experiences in sharing what they know helps push them to top performance—and that the future of credit unions is bright. 18SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pembroke Since joining CUES in March 2013, John Pembroke has played a leadership role in developing and launching a new direction in CUES’ strategy, branding and culture. Under his guidance, CUES … Web: www.cues.org Detailslast_img read more

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Otsego County confirms first case of the coronavirus

first_img(WBNG) — Otsego County health officials have reported the county’s first case of COVID19. Other close contacts of the Otsego County resident have been notified, the department says. The Otsego County Department of Health says the infected Otsego County resident is a close contact of a confirmed case that lives in another county. The health department says the individual has been residing in quarantine since they began to develop symptoms. For more coverage of the coronavirus, click here.last_img

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Diving tourism in Istria generated 200.000 overnight stays

first_imgRepresentatives of companies engaged in diving tourism in Istria, gathered at the Croatian Chamber of Commerce – Pula County Chamber, where a session of the Professional Group of Diving Tourism ŽK Pula was held to discuss this year’s tourist season. THE FIRST CROSS ROAD UNDER THE SEA IN THE WORLD OFFICIALLY OPENED IN TROGIR The tourist season in diving centers lasts for almost half of the year, and there are many centers that work all year round. Tourist diving is a strong motivator of arrival for guests who prefer special forms of tourism, so diving centers are recognized as an important stakeholder in the development of tourism in the Istrian County. “Diving centers are an important factor in preserving the seabed and ecology – after diving, divers almost always bring the waste they have collected underwater”Concluded Srečec. The diving tourism professional group of ŽK Pula points out that next year the professional group, among other things, plans to organize guest lectures at colleges and high schools in order to promote occupations in diving tourism and present activities to as many potentially interested young people who could future employment. found right in the diving centers. “Therefore, it is important to cooperate with the local community and network with other service providers in tourism in order to create the highest quality destination service that can meet the needs of guests in all segments of the stay in the destination”Points out Marko Srečec, president of the Diving Tourism Professional Group of ŽK Pula. The underwater world of the Istrian peninsula is rich in diverse and preserved flora and fauna, but also attractive underwater walls and reefs, caves and shipwrecks. NEW DIVING RULE ON DIVING ON THE CROATIAN COAST PRESENTED Istria is an increasingly interesting destination for guests of diving tourism, and this is best illustrated by the concrete figures of 200.000 overnight stays, not counting the daily visits made by tourists whose main motive for coming to the destination is diving. Diving centers (Cmas, paDI, NITROX, apNEa) are organized by diving centers throughout Istria, which take guests to attractive underwater locations. Also, they can rent quality and proven equipment or service their own. And it is important to point out that greater proximity to diving is provided by the proximity of the hyperbaric chamber located in Pula. Cover photo: Pexels.com by Maël BALLAND RELATED NEWS: In 2019, on the basis of a public tender of the Ministry of Culture, permits were obtained for performing underwater activities in inland waters and territorial sea in areas where cultural goods are located. The diving centers pointed out that they are satisfied with the cooperation with the Ministry of Culture, emphasizing the mutual interest in the maximum preservation of the underwater cultural heritage of the Adriatic. For the promotion of diving tourism, the Tourist Board of the Istrian County in 2012 issued a brochure in five languages ​​with diving locations and a brief description of all locations. Attachment: BROCHURE: ISTRIA DIVING last_img read more

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Consignia in £1bn FM deal

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Global Pride event to unite groups after cancelled parades

first_imgIt will also amplify black voices and the demand for racial justice from the Black Lives Matter movement.”I think when people look at Pride who are not necessarily affiliated with it … they see it as a big party. But behind the scenes, there’s so much work that’s being done to help push policies to help address human rights concerns.”Among those to be featured is the Pride movement in Georgia. Last year organizers of the first ever Pride event in the capital Tbilisi received death threats.Georgia organizer Giorgi Tabagari said being part of this year’s global event gave them some kind of security from the threat of attack.Another participating group is PINK DOT SG, that supports the LGBTQ community in Singapore.PINK DOT SG committee member Clement Tan said that one of the aims was to show people that COVID-19 would not stop groups from highlighting discrimination.  After the cancellation of hundreds of Pride parades due to the COVID-19 pandemic, national Pride networks have set up a new digital Global Pride day on June 27 to unite people all over the world in celebration and support.The 24-hour stream of music, performances and speeches will feature politicians including U.S. presidential hopeful Joe Biden, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Irish Prime Minister Leo Varadkar and spotlight the challenges faced in some countries by LGBTI+ individuals, many of which have increased since the start of the pandemic.”A lot of people, especially young people, have had to go back maybe to their families who might not be supportive or they had to go back to their home town which might be a bit more conservative,” said Ramses Oliva, 24, a trans gay man who is an ambassador for charity “Just Like Us” which supports LGBT+ young people. Topics :center_img Some individuals may not be out to their families and have even had “to go back to the closet”, he said.”I think that Pride for a lot of us is going to be just this chance to breath and to … remind ourselves of our identities and how important it is to keep celebrating them especially during tough times like this.”More than 500 Pride organizations submitted more than 1,000 pieces of content for Global Pride, and a volunteer production team are turning it into a 24-hour stream.”What makes Global Pride very unique is that this is the first Pride of its kind where we are really focused on bringing the entire LGBT global community together,” said Natalie Thompson, a chair of the Global Pride event.last_img read more

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