Jacobs seeks consistency

first_imgJamaica Scorpions leg-spinner Damion Jacobs says he hopes to secure at least another five-wicket haul before the end of the current WICB Regional Super50 in Barbados and Antigua.The recent West Indies ‘A’ recruit, who has been the Scorpions’ most successful bowler over the past two seasons, claimed five for 25 off 10 overs to claim the Man-of the Match Award against ICC Americas at Three W’s Oval on Tuesday.The haul helped Jamaica win the contest by 67 runs and lifted them to second in Group B behind Barbados. It also allowed Jacobs to pick up his second five-wicket haul in one-dayers in 15 matches.”It’s not easy to get five wickets in a 50-over match when you are only limited to just 10 overs,” assessed Jacobs.”Therefore, to claim my second five-wicket haul in 15 games is a privilege. I am just hoping that I can, at least, get another in this tournament as it would give my career the push.”Having represented West Indies ‘A’ on four occasions thus far, Jacobs also expressed hope that his performances would lead to West Indies and Caribbean Premier League representation.SECOND ON BOWLING CHARTSJacobs claimed 14 wickets in the Super50 last season, and although Jamaica failed to make it to the he semi-finals, finished second on the bowling charts behind Sulieman Benn, who snared 15 on his way to helping Barbados Pride win the title.Overall, Jacobs, who has also played lead roles for Jamaica at the regional four-day level, has 30 wickets in one-dayers at an average of 19.10.”I am just want to be consistent and learn as much as I can, and I’m trying to impress people towards a West Indies series selection, and Caribbean Premier League selection later in the year,” expressed the 32-year-old.”I also want to help win games for Jamaica as it’s a good feeling whenever I can contribute.”The victory propelled Jamaica to a two-win, two-loss record and placed them on nine points behind preseason favourites, Barbados, who have 19 points.The Guyana Jaguars and Combined Campuses and Colleges Marooners also have nine points, but have an inferior net run to the Scorpions.Jamaica will next play Combined Campuses and Colleges on Sunday as the return-leg fixtures of the tournament get going.The two top teams in each group will advance to the semi-finals, which will be contested in Antigua and Barbuda.last_img read more

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Health Min’s Son Brings in ‘Nutritional Food’ for Ebola Patients

first_imgThe efforts of a Des Moines man, a nonprofit group and a West Des Moines church combined last week to send 300,000 high-calorie, vitamin-filled meals to Ebola patients fighting for their lives in recovery centers in the Republic of Liberia.The shipment has left Des Moines, but another 400,000 meals will be shipped via sea freight once a donor is found to pay for the shipping costs. Altogether, the meals hopefully will feed 1,000 patients for six months.Walter Gwenigale Jr., 42, traveled to Liberia this summer to see his father, Walter Sr., 79, who is a doctor and the minister of health in Liberia. Gwenigale Jr.’s father is a native of Liberia, but wrapped up his medical training in the U.S. in 1972, then returned to his homeland with his wife, Carmen, also a medical professional. Together, they have spent decades as Christian health workers.Gwenigale Jr. also works in the health field as equal opportunity manager at the Veterans Medical Center in Des Moines, but what he saw in Africa this summer at the Ebola recovery centers shook him to the core.“The situation is indescribable,” he said. “The destructive nature of Ebola cannot be put into words, especially in a country that was just beginning to rebuild its health care infrastructure after a 14-year civil war.”He saw relief efforts and treatments and called the situation devastating. He knew he would have to help in some way because “with the right amount of international support, they can overcome this,” he said.When a patient is hospitalized in Liberia for anything other than Ebola, their meals are provided by local family members. But with the Ebola quarantine in place, families cannot get food to their loved ones. Instead, the patients must rely on the hospital and government funding to provide sources of food, and both are in dire condition.“The patients are isolated and the government’s funds are very limited to get the food in to the patients,” Gwenigale said. “So I sought the help of Outreach Inc. here in Iowa, (which) is very active in Africa in providing meals to malnourished and impoverished people. I knew they could help.”Rick McNary, vice president of strategic partnerships for Outreach Inc., said the non-profit group strives to engage volunteers across America in meal-packaging events. For example, this past week, the Miami Dolphins football team and the Miami community packaged 1 million rice and beans meals to be distributed at food pantries. Several John Deere plant employees across the U.S. have packaged 1 million mac and cheese meals to be retained at their local food banks. Those meals were created by Iowa State University food science researchers.The meals headed to Liberia are made of rice, soy protein, vegetables and 21 vitamins targeted to build the immune system of malnourished people.“Walter approached us and I instantly said, ‘Let’s do this.’ We do a lot of work in Africa and have seen people die of starvation there,” McNary said. “But the critical component for us is the ability to get the meals into a port and safely distributed.”Because Gwenigale has connections via his father, Outreach Inc. was comfortable the meals will arrive safely and be distributed to the targeted patients.And Gwenigale had another important source to aid in the project: the financial backing of his church to help pay for the shipping.Lutheran Church of Hope stepped in and with Global Health Ministries paid and arranged for the shipping of the container.The project arose so quickly there wasn’t a volunteer group available to package meals, so McNary tapped into an existing supply of 300,000 ready-made meals assembled by groups out of Minnesota and Missouri.But now another 400,000 meals remain to be shipped overseas; Gwenigale just needs a donor to pay for the shipping.“When you have Ebola, you lose a lot of your body’s nutrients and these meals are a great way to replace those,” he said.But while his mission is helping to feed the Ebola patients, Gwenigale also frets about his father’s overall wellbeing and that of others in Liberia who are facing starvation because of the outbreak.As the situation worsens, the cost of food on the local market increases, he said, so poor people cannot afford to eat.He said his father is “in the thick of it right now, but he’s always felt that this is what he was called to do, to provide care to those in need and who are impoverished, particularly in Liberia, because he is committed to enriching the lives of his own people.“Being there myself and hearing stories of how devastating it is, not just for those who are sick with Ebola, but those struggling with hunger because of the epidemic, I knew I had to help,” Gwenigale said.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Clinton Wants Liberians to Fight Stigmatization

first_imgFormer United States President, Bill Clinton, has called on Liberians to desist from stigmatizing Ebola survivors but rather embrace them and make them feel part of the Liberian society.  Speaking during a one day visit to the country on Monday, President Clinton said, “Don’t be afraid of them [Ebola survivors]; they are okay. They should be embraced, rather than discriminated against.”  President Clinton made the comments to reporters at the Emergency Operations Center on 18th Street in Sinkor. He held a meeting with the Incidence Management System (IMS) and partners (local and international) who have assisted Liberia in its fight against the Ebola virus disease.  Prior to the meeting, President Clinton interacted with some Ebola survivors, including the leadership of the Ebola Survivors Network who shared with him some of the challenges they face as individuals and as a network.  The president of the network, Patrick Faley, highlighted problems affecting them. He summed these up as discrimination, stigmatization, and access to jobs and healthcare.  President Clinton, responding said they were in the country because they didn’t want the world to forget about them. “We want to do what we can to help. I want the people in Liberia not to discriminate against you. They should not be afraid,” he urged Liberians, adding, “We have to get past this stigma. We can’t have your countrymen and women discriminate.   They should celebrate with you that you survived and help you deal with these other problems that come up.”  President Clinton’s call for an end to stigmatization comes with just few days left for the World Health Organization to declare Liberia free of the deadly virus.   The former US president said it is necessary to support Liberia’s post-Ebola recovery plan and assist President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf rebuild the country’s healthcare delivery system, specifically in training more healthcare workers. “We need to get the funds in here to train community health workers and other health practitioners to make sure you don’t get this disease,” he said.  President Clinton and his daughter Chelsea are on a nine-day visit of four African countries to observe foreign projects the Clinton Global Initiative has supported which is connected to healthcare, global warming, wildlife protection, education and agriculture. They have already visited Tanzania, Kenya and are now on their way to Morocco on the last leg of the African tour. This is the 12th time President Clinton has visited Africa.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Justin Tackaberry wins Taylor Speedway Mini Challenge

first_imgWith the rainout, Justin Tackaberry was this year’s winner of the Lazor Edge Engraving Mini Challenge, followed by Jesse Wassenaar, and Austin Kube. TAYLOR, B.C. — It was a bit of a soggy second half of the weekend at the Taylor Speedway for the 9th Annual Mini Challenge.Tyson LeClerc was the fastest on Saturday in the Junior Mini Sprints, which started at 4:00 p.m. Kieran Pickering placed 2nd, while Colten Beaumont ended up finishing in 3rd place. Eddie Scarfo finished in 1st in the Senior Mini Sprints, followed by Cody Willis and Anthony Seguin.In the Mini Juniors, Austin Kube was Saturday night’s fastest racer, followed by Jesse Wassenaar and Chantel Richards. Justin Tackaberry finished first in the Mini Adults, ahead of Calvin Hildebrand and Clint Mason.- Advertisement -Steve Baker was the fastest driver in the Bomber races, ahead of Swain Hackman and Chelsea Babcock. AJ Everton took the top spot in the IMCA Modifieds on Saturday, followed by John Stokes, Al Scarfo, and Kervin McElderry.Sunday afternoon began with the Mini Sprints, which saw the exact same results from Saturday, except in the Senior Mini Sprints: Kaden Beebe usurped Anthony Seguin to finish in 3rd place.Unfortunately, a frontal system meant that the Mini races ended up getting rained out, with only enough time to race the IMCA Modifieds on Sunday. Johnny Beaumont finished 1st in the IMCA’s, followed by AJ Everton, John Stokes and Darren Morin.Advertisementlast_img read more

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Doherty’s Costcutter sweeps the board in national awards

first_imgDoherty’s Costcutter in Ballybofey have won the Supermarket of the Year award and many more in the Barry Group National Awards.The popular store was awarded the Supermarket of the Year Award, the Overall Costcutter Store of the Year Award and also won Awards for their Fresh Produce and Deli offerings last week at the Barry retail group’s ceremony. In 2016 Doherty’s store in Carndonagh was also highly awarded.The independent judges said the store in Ballybofey deservedly took the highest accolade. The auditors noted the incredibly high standard across every facet of this store. This store continues to be a standard bearer for Costcutter and is a worthy winner of this prestigious award. Featured picture above shows (l – r) Jim Barry, Managing Director and Edwina Lucey, Sales Director, Barry Group, Mallow, Ronan (aged 13) and Niamh (11), their parents Michael and Olive and Susan and George Doherty, and Norman Lenihan, Head of Sales, Costcutter.Speaking of the awards, store manager Colin Harrison said it’s about having a team and motivating that team and communicating with that team:“It’s very easy for us to go up on the stage and collect the award, whereas in reality it’s a part you play – there’s a much bigger story than that you know, it’s the people on the ground consistently working to give that service and to give that standard to the customer. This Award is for the entire team, Colin added.“This Award is for the entire team,” Colin added.  Colin also wants to thank the people of Ballybofey and the surrounding areas who support the staff and the store on a daily basis. “Obviously without their loyalty we wouldn’t be here,” he said. Doherty’s Costcutter Ballybofey Staff: Grace Kelly, Karl Bradley, Colin Harrison (manager), Mark Harvey, Jacqueline Murphy and Louise Doherty (assistant manager)Colin added, “Ballybofey, as everybody knows, has a lot of competition but we try to stand out from the crowd by constantly delivering first class customer service, as well as offering quality products at the most competitive prices”.Jim Barry, Managing Director, Barry Group Mallow said, “Food retail is one of the most competitive sectors in Irish business, and indigenous operators like Costcutter and Barry Group Mallow continue to raise standards and quality, by reinvesting in range and customer service, and working with local suppliers to secure the value and service consumers expect.”“I would like to congratulate Michael, Susan and all the team in Costcutter, Ballybofey in winning this award and for continuing to raise the bar in the retail industry”, Jim added.The Barry Group, based in Mallow in Cork, is one of the country’s biggest retail distribution groups, owning and operating the Costcutter, Quik Pick, and Carry Out independent retail franchises, and providing wholesale food and alcohol distribution to over 1,000 independent retail customers through its nationwide central distribution network.Doherty’s Costcutter sweeps the board in national awards was last modified: September 11th, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:awardsBallybofeyCostcutterretaillast_img read more

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Leeds United ‘keen to sign Spurs outcast in January’

first_img Every time Ally McCoist lost it on air in 2019, including funny XI reactions The striker has scored just one Premier league goal no dice According to The Sun, Leeds are confident a deal can happen which would see Llorente reunite with former manager Marcelo Bielsa, who he played under at Athletic Bilbao and scored 118 goals in 333 appearances. BEST OF Which teams do the best on Boxing Day in the Premier League era? Ronaldo warned Lukaku how hard scoring goals in Serie A would be before Inter move Where Ancelotti ranks with every Premier League boss for trophies won Llorente, who moved to North London from Swansea City for £12.1million in August 2017, has struggled to feature for Mauricio Pochettino’s side, featuring in just two league matches this season.Frustrated, Llorente spoke of his struggles back in October: “It is never easy to cope with,” he said. “It is a daily struggle with myself, as I find it hard to accept the situation I am in.“It is frustrating to be left on the bench or not be called up. LATEST FOOTBALL NEWS Fernando Llorente has endured a frustrating time with Spurs Top nine Premier League free transfers of the decade 2 ADVICE MONEY 2 RANKED REVEALED Oxlade-Chamberlain suffers another setback as Klopp confirms serious injury huge blow Forbes list reveals how much Mayweather, Ronaldo and Messi earned this decade REVEALED Son ban confirmed as Tottenham fail with appeal to overturn red card Fernando Llorente could end his time at Tottenham Hotspur with a January switch to Leeds United in his quest for first-team football.The Championship club, currently third in the table, are hoping to boost their chances of returning to the Premier League and a move for the 33-year-old would be a shrewd piece of business. “I try to put myself in the manager’s shoes. He has a difficult task, as we have a big squad and we all want to play.“It can’t be easy to leave out players who have trained well. I’m also aware that I am at one of the biggest clubs in Europe.“There is a lot of competition in attack. Harry Kane is a phenomenal player, and that makes it difficult for me to play regularly.”last_img read more

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Zuma on South Africa’s growing influence

first_img11 July 2011Mahlamba Ndlopfu, the official residence of South Africa’s head of state in Pretoria, is on a secluded hillside covered with Jacaranda trees. There was little tranquility, however, in Jacob Zuma’s path to the presidency. In the long struggle against apartheid, he was an underground member of the military wing of the African National Congress and spent 10 years in prison on Robben Island. Before arriving at Mahlamba Ndlopfu in 2009, Zuma, sixty-nine, known as a populist who can get a crowd going, won a divisive internal battle with then president Thabo Mbeki and also fended off corruption charges. With Zuma at the helm, South Africa has played a growing role in global affairs even as it continues to struggle with poverty and inequality after the white-rule era. The country hosted the 2010 Fifa World Cup with great success. South Africa has a prominent voice as a non-permanent member of the United National Security Council. Zuma has sought to play a more influential part in African affairs, as illustrated by his mediation in the Libyan crisis; he has been sharply critical of Nato’s military intervention and the indictment of Muammar Gaddafi by the International Criminal Court. But perhaps the most notable development is South Africa’s admission into BRICS – Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa; Zuma sees the grouping of nations as the sharp end of the spear defending the interests of the developing world. Cairo Review Managing Editor Scott MacLeod interviewed Zuma at Mahlamba Ndlopfu on 26 May 2011. CAIRO REVIEW: South Africa has come a long way. How does it feel to be president today? PRESIDENT ZUMA: It feels a great responsibility. That is what is always a bigger challenge. Being a president of this county at this time, it imposes a very huge responsibility to ensure that South Africa moves forward, that if we are given this honor to be president at one time, you must help South Africa to move forward, to leave it better than what it was. That is quite a huge responsibility. CAIRO REVIEW: How did South Africa’s involvement in BRICS come about? PRESIDENT ZUMA: It came about partly because of the changing landscape of the globe. As you know, the emerging economies, the developing countries, have become quite powerful and have tried also to organize themselves. South Africa – besides BRICS, we are also in IBSA [the India-Brazil-South Africa Dialogue Forum], we are also playing our role in the continent, as well as in the United Nations. You know that we have also been part of the group of countries that began to attend the G-8 [Group of Eight] for a number of years before the coming into being of the G-20 [Group of Twenty], of which we are now a member. The changing world. The feeling of more interaction with South-South kind of countries. There is a Group of 77. [Among] the countries that are sort of emerging economies, you could begin to look to those as kind of leading, if you take China, India, Brazil, Russia also has emerged, and South Africa, and the continent of Africa. A discussion began to say, look, if there is BRIC, why can’t South Africa be there? Therefore the discussion began between South Africa and members of BRIC. But what was also important from our point of view was, with the changing world, if we have a grouping like BRIC without Africa, it is not fully represented, and therefore there is a need for South Africa to become a member in a sense that would also make Africa be represented and complete the jigsaw puzzle. After some discussions, everybody realized the need. If today in the world you are part of the globe, you cannot be disconnected from the African continent, which is currently one of the regions of the world which is fast growing. Of course if you are in Africa, you then look at the most economically developed country, and South Africa in a sense fits very well into that. It was after discussions, and of course there was an agreement and finally South Africa was accepted as a member of BRICS, which I think adds value to BRICS itself. South Africa becomes an important entry point to the continent of Africa. CAIRO REVIEW: What is the purpose of BRICS, and what is South Africa’s national interest in being a member? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Firstly, BRICS is important because as you know [in the] changing world there are issues that have been raised globally. For an example, the need to increase the representation of the developing countries in the leading institutions—financial institutions, for an example, whether you talk about World Bank or IMF [International Monetary Fund]. Of course, the UN has been there before. There is a lot of talk about the Security Council itself. That means the old world has a very organized collective voice which in the majority of cases is in defense of their own positions. They wouldn’t want to open up for a long time. And these emerging economies began to be the sharper point of the voice of the developing countries. And therefore BRICS becomes the really cutting edge of that voice. Once you are in BRICS, you are in fact seeing an alternative voice in terms of the global issues. Today, nobody could ignore the BRICS members in terms of the affairs of the world. For an example, almost all the BRICS members are part of the G-20. That tells you therefore the importance in terms of the global balance; [it is] very important that this particular grouping becomes very strong. Back to the interests of the nation: this is very important for South Africa because these are big economies which are growing. They are not shrinking like the old world, which today is not growing very fast. Therefore for South Africa to be part of BRICS means we have an opportunity to participate almost at the equal level with these big economies, which means our companies, our businesses – we have better kinds of agreements that take into account we belong to the same grouping. And therefore the opportunities are more open, and that will translate to developments within the national situation. South African companies will have access to the economies of these countries. That is an advantage we have at the national level. CAIRO REVIEW: Should BRICS form a common vision and agenda? PRESIDENT ZUMA: That would be one of the logical things. I think it is important that because we share common values, that’s the reason we are together. We also come from the developing countries with almost a similar kind of position in relation to the developed world. We share a lot of views together. I think even if it is not on every issue but on some of the major issues, we will certainly come together. It also gives us an opportunity to be able to exchange views among ourselves on the issues that affect the globe today. Bear in mind, BRICS represents almost half of the global population. Therefore you are talking about whether you are looking in terms of the population, in terms of the market, in terms of the economy itself; you are talking about a big kind of thing, which have similar kinds of similar relationships and similar backgrounds. I think therefore on a number of other issues we will certainly come together and have one voice and agree on certain issues that affect the developing countries, for an example. It doesn’t mean that on every other issue, because of course whilst we are a grouping, we are countries that are different. But I think we’ll certainly be gravitating to forming a common view on a number of global issues. CAIRO REVIEW: Is there a conscious effort among BRICS nations to stay in touch on a “BRICS position”? PRESIDENT ZUMA: We are meeting and discussing a number of issues – our relations, etc. We have not necessarily developed the fact that, let us caucus on every other issue. But there are issues that we talk about. For an example, in the last meeting, which by the way was [South Africa’s] first meeting, we talked about the problems in the Arab world, particularly in Libya. We talked about the UN resolutions which were taken by the Security Council, and we share the same common views about those kinds of issues. So I wouldn’t say we have established that as a kind of routine thing, but I am certain that with time, the issues will determine how we actually act on those kinds of issues. CAIRO REVIEW: Will the issues tend to be more economic than political? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I think all the issues. You cannot separate economics from politics. CAIRO REVIEW: Critics ask how you reconcile shared economic interests with the contrast in other values, like human rights: South Africa is a champion of human rights, while China has a deficit. PRESIDENT ZUMA: No, I don’t think that is a problem really. It can’t be. It can’t be a problem when South Africa is part of that space. It can’t be. You will agree with me that one [country], which has been described as a leading economy of the world, and a leading democracy, the United States of America, has very close relations economically with China. That issue has not arisen. I don’t think that issue really arises. China is today one of the biggest economies, and it links with a number of other countries. If anything, I think that as it happens in the world, we will always influence one another on values and human rights. We stand on our human rights. We have a good record on that and believe in it, very much so. But it has not become an obstacle. As I say, other big countries who believe as we do have a very close relationship with China. CAIRO REVIEW: Have BRICS countries caucused on the election of a new IMF chief? PRESIDENT ZUMA: We have not caucused yet. I am in the process of trying to talk to my colleagues about that issue because I think it is an important issue, given the change I talked about. I’m in the process of trying to talk to my colleagues. CAIRO REVIEW: One of your ministers [Trevor Manuel, who is also a former finance minister] has been mentioned as a possible candidate for that position. PRESIDENT ZUMA: That is something we’d certainly like to see. It is consistent with our view that we need transformation. We need the developing world to be at the decision-making levels. I think the time has come. CAIRO REVIEW: In the need for global governance reform, how far should it go? What really needs to be done? PRESIDENT ZUMA: The global system at the moment is lopsided. Global governing institutions were established back in the 1940s, when the world, in terms of countries, was totally different. Even the number of members of the United Nations was different. It was at the end of the World War, the world was entering the Cold War, which has been there for a long time. The Cold War has ended, many countries are there. There are issues that should be taken into account – that some of the rules and regulations that were then laid down, other counties were not there. Therefore, given the change that has taken place in the world, you need the representation to be different. You cannot have, for example, some other regions of the world who are not represented at the decision-making; it doesn’t make good sense. Decisions that are taken affect everybody else. If we take the United Nations, we see no reason why the Security Council should remain the preserve of the few in terms of the permanent membership. People say, “We all believe in democracy”. You can’t be the champion of democracy but at the same time be so conservative in practice. It doesn’t make good sense. You can’t say all others should be democratic, but we have some preserve that you must not touch. It doesn’t make good sense. We believe that the Security Council should be opened up. In other words, regions of the world should be represented in the same way. You have one region that dominates, the European region. Why that should be the case? It doesn’t make good sense. These are the kind of views we are putting across. As well as financial institutions. Many of the financial decisions that are taken affect the globe, and some regions are developing, and many of these decisions affect these regions. Why can’t they be part of the decision-making? That is most important. CAIRO REVIEW: How hard will you push for that? What kind of resistance are you meeting from the Western countries? PRESIDENT ZUMA: We have been pushing very hard, very hard. There was great resistance at the beginning. I think at the moment there is the beginning of appreciating our point. They are beginning to talk about some quotas – that yes, some opening should be made in some institutions. Even in the Security Council the debate is very strong. The very fact that today we have non-permanent members coming in is in itself an appreciation of what we are talking about. We say that we should really complete everything. So we will push hard because we think if we live in the globe, that everything should be fair, that there should be equality, that democracy should be the system, then that must be practiced. We couldn’t just talk about it and then not practice it where it must be practiced. CAIRO REVIEW: Can you talk about South Africa’s relationship with China? How deep is that going to go? PRESIDENT ZUMA: It will go very deep. We have established very good relations with China. We have signed an important comprehensive agreement with China which opens up the kind of economic relations between the two countries. And we have historical ties with them. We are working very, very hard to ensure that we take advantage of Chinese markets. They also take advantage of our market, which includes the continent. So we would want them to go even deeper. There is nothing strange about it. Because all countries who have had an opportunity to do so have done so. The economic relation between China and the United States of America is very deep and very huge. So there is nothing out of the ordinary in what we are doing. CAIRO REVIEW: Are you concerned that China, as a very big country with a high demand for natural resources and scouring the world for markets, could overwhelm a member of BRICS that does not have such economic clout? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Not at all. We don’t have that problem. If anything, we think [in] the relationship with China we take advantage of this market to satisfy our own needs. It should also be looked at from that point of view: that our coming closer to China helps to address our own problems. It is not a one [way] street kind of relationship. We have had relations with big countries, as big as the United States. There was no complaint that they were swamping our economy. Not at all. I think it is a similar kind of thing. Relations are open between countries. Countries know their own limitations. But they also know their needs, as we do. As we go to this interaction, we have that in mind. And we of course have an experience that we have had relationships with other big countries in the past. It is not as if it is the first time we go to a relationship of this nature. CAIRO REVIEW: As you say, another big country is the United States. How does South Africa see the US role in the world today? Friend? Foe? Constructive? Or not? With respect to the developing world, Africa, South Africa? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I wouldn’t want to describe the United States like answering a question, “Is it an enemy or a friend?” We have had very friendly relations with the United States, and it has been a view in the continent here that the United States could have done even more than it has done up until now. But I think that relations have been growing positively, and I think we are very close with President Obama. I think Obama’s understanding of the challenges of the African continent is very positive. He has in fact increased the interaction between the United States and us. We are very happy with it, but there could even be more. And we are working for that, that we have got more very positive relations. So we regard the United States – the United States as you know it is one of the leading countries in the world, and we believe that its emphasis on good relationships and peace and stability in the world is an important role that the United States plays. And of course we believe that role should be played collectively by all counties. I think from our point of view, we have been with the United States on the G-8, G-20, and the interaction has been very useful. We are interacting on any other issues, including global issues like climate change, etc. We believe that time has come that no matter how big the country, the area of collective work, working together, is a thing that we should embrace, more than one dominating others. So at the moment, the United States is not standing wanting to dominate. It wants working together, and we think that is a positive thing. CAIRO REVIEW: What more would you like to see? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Generally. In economic development, in investment, direct foreign investment, we think it could increase. They could do more business with South Africa than they are at the moment. CAIRO REVIEW: Are you satisfied as an African leader that the US plays a constructive role in places like the Middle East, relations with China, global governance? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Generally, I have no quarrel with what the United States is doing at the moment. I think they are playing their role positively. We participate together in these institutions and groupings. It is playing a very positive role. I have absolutely no quarrel. They are ready to participate and help. But I must indicate that it is not just the United States only. The manner in which I think at the moment we are handling the Libyan question, unfortunately, is beginning to introduce a feeling that the AU [African Union] is not regarded seriously by the developed counties. Here is a situation where the AU has the most advanced proposal on the table to bring about peace and stability, [but] there doesn’t seem to be a good connection, so the behavior so far is, people are beginning to see that kind of behavior as not taking the African Union seriously. That’s the only thing I can talk about at the moment. Given the fact that Libya is on the African continent and therefore the AU should really be playing a prominent role. But that does not affect only the United States. It affects all the forces that are combined in terms of how they are looking at the solution in Libya. I hope we are not going to have more of such kind of experiences. CAIRO REVIEW: South Africa, and especially the ANC, have had a long relationship with the Gadhafi regime. How has it felt as an ally of Gadhafi in the past to view the revolution in Libya? On your upcoming mission to Libya, what do you see as a possible outcome? Could that include giving the leader of Libya political asylum in South Africa? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Firstly, the Libyan situation is not a situation that is isolated from what was happening in the Arab world. As you know, Tunisia had a problem, Egypt and other countries, which is borne out of how the governance has been. It came to Libya. So I don’t think we should look at Libya that it just emerged from Libya. There was no such thing. It was a trend. What became different in Libya was the manner in which the Libyan government responded to the issue, which then led to really serious violence – to almost a civil war. We believe as democrats that people have a right to call for a fair system of government. I think the problem that we had in Libya is that they have got a system that is not like any other kind of government system. And the people in Libya said, “No, we now need a kind of different government.” You can’t say the people are wrong. Once the issue is raised, it needed to be attended to, not confronted with violence. That was our difference there. As we have arrived, where people are saying we now need a government which is representative, and in Libya you would understand the situation. Because whatever system that had been introduced in Libya, people have reached a point that they are saying, “We don’t like it, we think we should have a normal kind of system.” You can’t say people are wrong. We never took sides. We always said if people are making a demand, any, any government must listen to its people. Once there was violence, then we had a problem. That’s why we are part of the United Nations resolutions: because we saw the killings that immediately emerged and said you cannot allow it. If people say they want change, listen to them and see what logic they are bringing. Are they asking for change when there is a proper system that satisfies everybody else? Particularly if they have got a very different kind of system that is not practiced anywhere else in the world. You must look at yourself and say there must be something wrong. That did not happen. So our view was that once there was a conflict, let the Libyan people have an opportunity to discuss the matter and solve their problems. We have said – and on this we are together with all AU members – we did not want any military intervention from outside, because it is not going to help us. We remain with that position. The AU taking that position then established the high-level committee to then go and help. That’s the committee that South Africa belongs to, which leads to your second question. I’m going to Libya partly because I belong to that committee, and partly because there has been a view that we need to do extraordinary things to help the situation in Libya. I am going to Libya – this will be for the second time since this [crisis] – went as a collective, I am now going there as a country. As you know, we met with the rebels. We met both sides. Therefore, we have contact with both sides. We have felt that it is necessary to find different ways. So I am going to Libya to also pursue the discussion of saying what solution could be found. CAIRO REVIEW: Do you feel you have a way of persuading Colonel Gadhafi to accept an agreement? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Like anyone, once there is a problem you have to find a way to communicate. I know President Gadhafi very well. We have had a lot of discussion before about matters in the continent. I think it is quite possible that we could discuss and perhaps look at the situation differently, because I am keen to know how he is looking at the situation. We have a view that as the AU we shall be representing: that there must be a ceasefire. We presented this to him, and he accepted it. And that after the ceasefire, there must be a process of negotiations. So that to solve the problem, we stop the killings. It’s important, and we are putting exactly the same point on the rebels. That the fighting is not going to help; we need a solution. The AU must be part of that solution because this is a member of the AU. These are the matters we raise. I cannot foretell what’s going to happen, but knowing him I think we would be able to discuss something that could perhaps help move towards resolving the problem. CAIRO REVIEW: Can you imagine a solution that leaves Gadhafi in power in Libya? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I wouldn’t want to imagine. I think it would not be right for me to imagine whether he should remain or not. That’s a decision of the Libyan people, which would include himself. He is a Libyan himself. I don’t think I’d want to prejudge the situation. CAIRO REVIEW: Seen from Pretoria, can you be optimistic about the future of Africa? You have crises in Libya, Zimbabwe, Congo, Ivory Coast, Sudan, and illiteracy, HIV/Aids. So many problems. PRESIDENT ZUMA: I am very optimistic about Africa. I am very optimistic. I think we have moved from a more difficult situation. We are in a better situation today than what we have been probably fifteen or twenty years ago. We work together more than we did before. I think there are more democratic counties today than there were before. There are more elections in the continent than there were before. We have, for an example, a system that checks how things are going in the continent, a peer review mechanism that has been established, and more countries are joining to become part of it, more countries are being reviewed how they are doing their systems. That thing was not there before. We have dealt with a number of pockets of conflicts in the continent. Today you could count them with one hand and not even finish on one hand, and in the past there were conflicts all over. There is more agreement on the continent today to move forward, democratically and otherwise. We have for an example discouraged the question of coups in Africa. No general in the continent today can think he could wake up and conduct a coup and become a president. That does not work. Those that have made attempts have had to immediately call elections, because this is the stand that Africa has taken. All of that must tell you one must be optimistic about Africa. CAIRO REVIEW: Have you been disappointed that South Africa has not had more influence in the crisis over President Mugabe’s rule in Zimbabwe? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I think to some degree we have never thought it would reach this point. We thought by this time we would have resolved the situation in Zimbabwe. But of course each country has its own dynamics. I think we have made progress in Zimbabwe, progress that has been as a result being a neighbour, of being part of SADC [Southern Africa Development Community], working together. We work with Zimbabweans on a number of issues and we have been making progress. Each time SADC meets, we give a report that marks the progress. It has been difficult, though, because the dynamics there did not allow our interventions in terms of helping facilitate things to move quicker. But yes, we are hopeful that we will resolve the matters in Zimbabwe. CAIRO REVIEW: How does the Arab revolution look from South Africa? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I think the relations will remain normal. I don’t think they will change. What has happened is actually a change in terms of how those people have been governed. I think the protests have been against what they call autocratic government. They want more openness, they want freedom, they want democracy. I think that should be respected. Because people who are governed are people. If they say we want to have a different system of government, they should. Therefore, whatever happened in the changes, South Africa will remain a country with good relations with the counties in the Arab world. I’m hopeful that these protests will really bring about more openness in terms of governance there, that it will help introduce democracy, so that it could have serious regular elections, and with the participation of the people. CAIRO REVIEW: What role can South Africa play in resolving the question of Iran’s nuclear program? You are presently a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council, and your country country was the first to dismantle all of its nuclear weapons. PRESIDENT ZUMA: We have played a role. Firstly, from the point of view of being a member of the United Nations, we have been participating in those debates. But we have also played the role in terms of bilateral [relations], talking to Iran. I think to some degree, not a bigger role than anybody else, to some degree given our experience of nuclear things, as well as our relations, as well as our being a member of the United Nations and a non-permanent member of the Security Council, we think there is a role that we could play. We are not saying it is a decisive one, but there is a role that we can play, we believe. CAIRO REVIEW: President Mandela, President Mbeki, and now President Zuma – how do you distinguish the different presidencies? PRESIDENT ZUMA: [Cairo Review Interview continued: click here] This interview was first published by The Cairo Review of Global Affairslast_img read more

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Brand South Africa views World Bank 2018 Report as a clarion call to action

first_imgJohannesburg, Monday 14 January 2019 – Brand South Africa noted the areas of concern expressed in the World Banks’ Global Economic Prospects report which indicates that South Africa’s real GDP growth will expand by 1.3% in 2019.While the South African GDP outlook has seen a downward revision, this happens in a global context where the World Bank indicates that international trade and investment are moderating. Additionally the global economy and trading system is being challenged by trade tensions that remain elevated.Furthermore, the World Bank expects growth in emerging market and developing economies to lose momentum, and is projected to reach 4.2 percent this year. Important for South Africa is the fact that increased trade tensions between major economies stand to have a negative impact on commodity exporters due to potential price volatility.The World Bank had initially projected South Africa’s growth to be 1.8% in June 2018. However, the downward revision of the GDP outlook for 2019 is attributed to high levels of unemployment, challenges in mining production, low business confidence,  policy uncertainty, as well as slow growth in household credit extension which could constrain domestic demand.Speaking about the report, Brand South Africa’s GM for Research, Dr Petrus de Kock said: “While we acknowledge the bank’s report which states that South Africa’s growth is considerably lower than the 4.2% projected average of its emerging market peers, let us be reminded of the economic revival, and investment initiatives which have been put in place over the last year by President Cyril Ramaphosa.”Dr de Kock continued: “The success of the inaugural Investment Conference – as well as the Job Summit are coming to fruition. We see that the Department of Labour has begun implementing ideas with a R2 billion fund  which aims to create over 10,000 jobs, and fund small businesses.  The Investment Conference led to international and domestic companies pledging R290 billion in investments in South Africa – and this is on top of the R400 billion which was received during the investment drive by the special investment envoys and through various countries during state visits.”The World Bank report cites policy uncertainty as an additional challenge which confronts South Africa’s growth. In response Dr de Kock said that this is a typical and unfortunate opinion in an election year. The South African government, together with business acknowledge that investment will not occur without policy certainty.“In preparation for the 2018 Investment Conference government undertook significant analysis to identify structural constraints, as well as policy- or administrative hurdles, that inhibit investment or business. To this end the President announced initial steps towards structural reform at the investment conference. And subsequently, on the economic policy front, Cabinet, as recently as November 2018, approved the Strategy Framework for the pursuit of South Africa’s strategic economic interests which aims to ensure that international engagements serve the country’s domestic policy imperatives such as poverty alleviation, unemployment and inequality,” adds Dr de Kock.Dr de Kock says since the tabling of the 2018 Budget in Parliament, government has sought to reduce policy uncertainty and restore investor confidence by finalising the Mining Charter – which the SA mining industry has responded to positively; re-established a sustainable approach to energy planning by updating the Integrated Resource Plan for consideration by Parliament; revised the Public Procurement Bill, currently awaiting Cabinet approval for public consultation, which will replace existing regulations; and also appointed a panel to advise government on measures to effect fair and equitable land reform that will increase agricultural output and build self-sufficiency in food production.While the GDP outlook may have been revised by the World Bank, the work to stimulate growth, create jobs, and develop South African society continues. In coming week the President will lead Team SA’s delegation at WEF Davos (22-25 January). Following on the successful investment conference, the President will lead the delegation with a single- minded message focused on sharing outcomes from the conference, and communicating the fact that South Africa offers investors a stable environment, with significant hard- and soft infrastructure, regional connectivity, and a sophisticated and highly diversified market to operate in.At WEF Davos, Brand South Africa in partnership with ABSA, will host an investment seminar where the President and Minister of Trade and Industry – Dr Rob Davies will engage directly with international business representatives, and policy makers to profile South Africa’s policies, initiatives for business and investment. Following on that South Africa hosts the Mining Indaba during February, an event that annually attracts more than 7000 participants from all over the world. At this event developments in the Mining Charter, and opportunities for investment and business in the sector will be shared with fund managers, mining executives and decision makers.“This means that all is not lost, the work of realising GDP expansion requires innovation not only on the investment front. It requires South Africans themselves, who’s innovations, businesses (micro, small or large), creative solutions, products and services will ultimately help drive national economic growth. However, as a nation there are several lessons to take from the World Bank’s annual Global Economic Prospects report. As an open and transparent democratic system, government and business leaders have to work much harder to maintain the momentum and confidence in the country’s economy which was lifted by the investment conference among other initiatives,” concluded Dr de Kock.For more information or to set up interviews, please contact: Tsabeng NthiteTel: +27 11 712 5061Mobile: +27 (0) 76 371 6810Email:tsabengn@brandsouthafrica.comVisit www.brandsouthafrica.comlast_img read more

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Why You Must Challenge Negative Beliefs in Public

first_imgYou praise people in public, and you reprimand them in private. By reprimanding them in private, you prevent them from being embarrassed, from having to defend themselves, and you demonstrate to those in your charge that they are going to be treated fairly. This is a good practice, except when it isn’t.You may have someone on your team who is doing well, and who their peers look to as a model, for advice or for help understanding the way things work. Occasionally, one of these high performers will also be negative and cynical. Worse still, they will also be vocal.Even though they are succeeding, they will speak up in meetings about how your products are not right for the market. They will explain out loud why your competitor’s products are better, and they’ll point to lost deals as proof. The people in your charge will hear this and take note, thinking to themselves, “If this top performer loses because our products aren’t right, how can I win?”This top performer will also complain about your pricing model, even when that pricing model has afforded them the luxury of a compensation structure that provides them with an exceptional living. Even though this person is doing well they’ll point out all of the deals that they lost to your irrational competitor as proof that the price is too high, stating out loud that a concession on price was all that would have been necessary to win. The rest of the sales force will hear these words and believe that their deals going to suffer the same fate.And here is the outcome of this negative high performer complaining out loud: The rest of the sales force will believe it is is true, looking to this person for their beliefs about what is necessary to succeed. In this negative person’s words, they will find the rationale for their failure to perform. It won’t be their skills, it will be the product. It won’t be an inability to convey the value of your offering, or the fact that they aren’t prospecting enough to have good prospects, it will be the pricing that they blame for not succeeding. It won’t be mistakes that they made during the sales process that causes losses when the irrational competitor is there to serve as their scape goat.This is why you must deal with this negativity in public. Your team needs to see you stand up to the high performer, pointing to the absurdity of someone who is doing well complaining that sales isn’t easier, and disabusing them of their excuses. Doing this in private deprives them of seeing what you believe strongly enough to fight over.Your team needs to be infected with your beliefs, not the beliefs of someone who would provide them with excuses. You are the spiritual leader of your sales force, and that means building the right mindset in your team. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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Assam warns tea estates against selling leased lands

first_imgThe Assam government on Wednesday warned tea estates against selling land leased out to them, but said planters may be allowed to diversify by using such land for other industries.There had been reports of major tea estates and small tea growers selling leased land. Officials said about 20% of 3,07,080 hectares of land under tea plantation had been leased out by the government over the years.Replying to a question by BJP legislator Sanjoy Kishan in the Assembly on Wednesday, State Industry Minister Chandra Mohan Patowary said the government would consider proposals from planters to set up other industries on such land.Probe demanded“We will not tolerate sale of the land leased out to them specifically for tea cultivation. But we may approve proposals for diversification by the planters,” Mr Patowary said.Other BJP legislators demanded a probe into the allegations that tea estates had been selling land illegally. Speaker Hitendra Nath Goswami too sought steps to protect the tea industry, which has been under pressure from increasing input costs and falling prices.Illegal sale of land was one of the factors why the government had last year toyed with the idea of de-leasing an acre of land in each of 792 registered tea estates for setting up schools. Another factor was the estate management’s indifference to a request for land to set up high schools for tea plantation workers.Tea estate owners were unhappy with the State government for not heeding their plea to increase the lease period to 10 years from one year now.last_img read more

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