Watch Snarky Puppy Make Their SXSW Debut With ‘Shofukon’ [Pro-Shot Video]

first_imgHaving toured the world several times, Snarky Puppy has covered a lot of playing grounds. Over the weekend, the two-time Grammy Award-winning band added South By Southwest to their growing list of new experiences with a GroundUP Music showcase at the Cedar Street Courtyard. Featuring performances from Michelle Willis, The Funky Knuckles, Cory Henry, Bill Laurance, Banda Magda, and of course, Snarky Puppy, the night was a perfect introduction to the world of SXSW.Members of Snarky Puppy, Michael League, Bill Laurance, Robert Searight, and Chris McQueen, found some time to sit down with Music Is Universal to talk a little bit about the band, how they came together, and how twenty-six members are able to rotate in a band that frequents the road. Watch the full clip below:Snarky Puppy Interview – SXSW 2016 by musicisuniversalAlso surfaced from their SXSW debut is a professionally shot video of their hit “Shofukan” from their performance at Cedar Street Courtyard last night. Watch it here:Snarky Puppy – Shofukon (Live at SXSW 2016) by musicisuniversallast_img read more

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Around the Schools: Harvard Law School

first_imgHarvard Law School is losing a faculty member to the federal government, even as it regains one.Laurence Tribe ’66, the Carl M. Loeb University Professor at Harvard, has been named senior counselor for access to justice in the Department of Justice, and he will lead an initiative aimed at improving access to civil and criminal legal services.Justice Department officials say they hope the initiative will elevate the importance of legal access issues and help prompt concrete steps to address them. The primary focus of the initiative will be to improve indigent defense, enhance the delivery of legal services to the poor and middle class, and identify and promote alternatives to court-intensive and lawyer-intensive solutions.In another development, Jody Freeman returns to the School’s faculty this month, after serving in the White House as counselor for energy and climate change for more than a year.Freeman, a leading scholar of administrative and environmental law, will be appointed to an endowed chair in public law named for former Solicitor General and Watergate special prosecutor Archibald Cox Jr. She will work at the School and across the University to harness Harvard’s talents and resources toward shaping global energy policy. The professor will also resume her role as director of the School’s Environmental Law Program, which she founded in 2006. ­If you have an item for Around the Schools, please e-mail your write-up (150-200 words) to georgia_bellas@harvard.edu.last_img read more

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How our bodies harness energy

first_imgIn exploring how humans harness energy to work, Robert A. Lue said the answer lies deep within.Very deep within.“When we think about work, we think about our careers, weightlifting, or gardening,” said Lue, the faculty director of the Harvard Ed Portal, and of HarvardX, professor of the practice of molecular and cellular biology, and the Richard L. Menschel Faculty Director of the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning. “But our cells also need to prioritize the doing of work.“There’s a lot that goes on inside cells that is truly remarkable, and that has tremendous relevance for us and our own health,” the Harvard professor noted during his April 21 talk at the Ed Portal titled “How Do Our Bodies Harness Energy To Do Work?”Each human being is made up of 5 trillion to 10 trillion cells, Lue said, and each cell is “a small universe” with its own tremendous complexity. In addition, each highly organized cell operates like “a remarkably well-organized factory,” where each component has a very specific job.“At the molecular level,” Lue said, “we live in a mechanical world.”Drawing from his upcoming HarvardX course, “Cell Biology: Mitochondria,” which launches May 25, Lue drew the audience’s attention to that specific part of the human cell, explaining the detailed way in which mitochondria produce the majority of energy in the body.But the most fascinating question about mitochondria may be: Where did they come from?Mitochondria, Lue observed, are remarkably similar to bacteria.Lue suggested that as some bacteria evolved the ability to process oxygen to harness energy — an element that millions of years ago was toxic to most single-cell organisms — a collaboration with profound implications occurred.Robert A. Lue, faculty director of the Harvard Ed Portal, offered his audience insight into his upcoming HarvardX course during a talk on April 21. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff PhotographerScientists hypothesize that “one larger cell engulfed one or more of these primitive bacteria,” Lue said. “And instead of breaking them down, they held onto them and developed a collaborative relationship with them — an endosymbiotic relationship.”Among other things, this means, he said, that each mitochondrion in our cells has a separate genome from our cells.“They are not independent from your cells, but a lot of evidence indicates that mitochondria are semi-independent,” Lue said. “It may be one of the greatest examples of the evolution of cooperation — not between two species, such as human and dogs, but between two cells that gained mutual advantage from one existing within the other.”When introducing Lue to the Harvard Ed Portal audience, Kevin Casey, associate vice president for public affairs and communications, said Lue was committed to connecting Harvard with the neighborhoods around Allston and Brighton, as well as with lifelong students all around the world.“[Rob] is passionate about making Harvard more conscious of its responsibilities in the community, and the reality of bringing education to the masses,” Casey said, speaking at the Harvard Ed Portal. “This very building, with its top-notch technology, a performance space, an art gallery open to the public — is all the a result of the vision of Rob Lue, and he created it so that people in the community and people at Harvard could learn from one another.”For Monserrat Santiago, a resident of Puerto Rico currently visiting Chelsea, Mass., the talk was an opportunity to dive more deeply into her love of science — and her own health.“As a chemist, I’m always looking for opportunities to learn more about science, so I was very happy I could come tonight,” she said. “I think it’s good for people to come to talks like this. I’m a cancer survivor, and I wanted to get a better idea of how cells work. I have more questions, but I feel like I have a better understanding of how the human body works, and what we need to do to ensure better health.”Lue’s presentation was just one of many events held at Harvard as part of this year’s Cambridge Science Festival (CSF), opened by Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker. Another CSF event focusing on the human form — Art, Science, & the Body — opened at the Ed Portal on April 23.last_img read more

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University criticizes concessions CEO

first_imgNotre Dame publicly criticized Des Hague, CEO of Centerplate, a sports catering company that supplies concessions for Irish sporting events, for allegedly abusing a dog in an elevator in Vancouver.“We find the actions of Centerplate’s CEO to be deplorable and will closely monitor this matter as the company conducts its internal review,” University spokesman Dennis Brown said in a statement Monday, according to a WSBT report.A viral video that surfaced last week depicted a man dragging and kicking a Doberman puppy. According to a statement made through his attorney and published Monday by Fortune, Hague apologized for the incident, which was “completely and utterly out of character.”“I am ashamed and deeply embarrassed,” he said. “… a minor frustration with a friend’s pet caused me to lose control of my emotional response … I would like to extend my apology to my family, company and clients, as I understand that this has also reflected negatively on them.”Centerplate has supplied concessions at Notre Dame since 2011 and currently covers all on-campus sporting events, according to a WSBT report.“We’re continuing to monitor the company’s response and await to see what authorities in Vancouver report before commenting further,” University spokesman Paul Browne said in a statement.Tags: abuse, Centerplate, Dennis Brown, Notre Dame, Paul Brownelast_img read more

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Precision Farming on Display

first_imgWhen Craig Kvien tells about the gee-whiz technology to be displayed during the GeorgiaAg Showcase ’96, there’s a lot of little kid in his voice.Georgia Ag Showcase ’96 will be June 29 at the Rural Development Center in Tifton. It’sgeared to farmers and anyone interested in Georgia farming.The event is co-sponsored by the UGA College of Agricultural and EnvironmentalSciences, Fort Valley State College and Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College.One of the show’s best prospects — for farmers, science teachers or anyone else — isthe chance to talk with people like Kvien, a University of Georgia crop physiologist whochairs the National Environmentally Sound Production Agriculture Laboratory.”You should see that combine,” he says, referring to a yield-monitoringpeanut harvester UGA engineers developed in concert with a host of participating firms.”It looks like a race car, with decals identifying all the cooperatingcompanies.”Such harvesters are mostly grain combines now, Kvien says. The peanut combine, inanother year or so, will add to these space-age machines.Every second or so the combines measure and record the volume, weight and moisture of acrop sample, along with where in the field it came from.When the whole field is harvested, the farmer can feed all of the data into a computer.The result is a color-coded map of his field’s harvest.”At the show we’ll have maps from Georgia fields showing a whole range ofcrops,” Kvien says. “These maps describe the yield variance within afield.”The combines, and the resulting maps, will make it easy to test crop varieties.”All you’ll have to know is where you planted them in the field,” he says.Their best use, though, may be diagnosing problems. “With them you can look forthe causes of low-yield areas,” Kvien says. “It might be soil compaction here,chinch bugs there, or nematodes, or weeds.”Or it might be ‘I-haven’t-got-a-clue,'” he laughs, admitting no one has allthe answers.Besides the state-of-the-art combines, the June farm show will display a number ofsprayers designed to target specific weeds.”One sprayer turns on and off when it sees chlorophyl,” Kvien says. “Itcan sense a plant smaller than a dime and turn a nozzle on. But it won’t turn it on for agreen dollar bill — I’ve tried lots of ways to fool that thing!”Another sprayer targets weeds taller than the crop — a valuable feature for peanutgrowers.”Imagine running about rabbit-high across a peanut field and turning on a sprayernozzle every time you see a weed above the peanuts,” Kvien says. “It turns anozzle on for an eighth of a second.”We tested that sprayer in a field with beggarweed and Texas panicum,” hesays. “And we got an 80-percent reduction in herbicide use with the same weed kill.Now, that’s something. This is a great concept.”The big question now is, ‘How many acres do you have to run it over to pay forthe equipment?'” he says.Among the other high-tech gadgets on display will be a four-wheeler equipped to measureand find problem areas in a field.And Kvien finds an automatic soil sampler fascinating. Mounted in the back of a pickup,the unit extends an arm over the side and takes soil samples from an arc around thepickup. It then packs the samples away for analysis — if you don’t get the truck stuck.”If you do get stuck, the soil sampler can help you get out,” he laughs.”Guess how we found that out? And you can get stuck where it can’t help you get out,too.”It’s comforting to think that all that technology hasn’t taken mud, or humor, out offarming.<last_img read more

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Drug Boss Figueroa Agosto’s Ex-Wife Surrenders to Dominican Law Enforcement

first_imgBy Dialogo April 19, 2011 The former wife of drug boss José David Figueroa Agosto surrendered to Dominican Republic law-enforcement authorities after having been a fugitive since September 2009, the Dominican public prosecutor’s office announced on 17 April. “Yesterday (Saturday) she arrived in the country (from Spain), in the custody of a representative of the Public Prosecutor’s Office,” the Santo Domingo public prosecutor, Alejandro Moscoso, declared at a press conference, explaining that the suspect had turned herself in to the Spanish authorities before arriving in the country. The official indicated that Leavy Yadira Nin Batista, alias Fior Jansen Rodríguez, who is Dominican and has a daughter with Figueroa Agosto (alias “Cápsula” [“Capsule”]), surrendered “voluntarily,” following negotiations between the authorities and her lawyers that began several months ago. “We suggested to her that it would best for her if she surrendered, because if she did not turn herself in and was arrested by the Spanish authorities and INTERPOL,” she would be jailed “for several months in Spain,” the prosecutor said. Nin Batista left the Dominican Republic using false documents in September 2009, before charges were filed against her. She is accused of money laundering, illicit association, and use of false documents, among other offenses related to a drug-trafficking ring headed by Figueroa Agosto, who was arrested by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA) in Puerto Rico in July 2010. The DEA arrested the drug boss after his escape in 2000 from a Puerto Rican prison, where he is serving a 209-year sentence for a long list of crimes such as kidnapping and murder. “The suspect Nin Batista also arrived accompanied by her minor daughter with Figueroa Agosto,” Moscoso specified. He added that the detainee will be jailed pending trial and that the Dominican courts will subsequently hold a preliminary hearing to determine charges, a stage at which proceedings are also underway against the others suspected of involvement in the drug-trafficking ring.last_img read more

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Right-hand Man of Mexican Cartel Boss “El Chapo” Guzmán Arrested

first_img One of cartel boss Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán’s right-hand men in northwestern Mexico has been detained by military personnel, the Secretariat of Defense announced in a statement. Raúl Sabori Cisneros (“El Negro” [“The Black”]) was detained on 16 April in an operation without “a single shot fired,” the statement emphasized. The detainee is the “chief operator and second-most-important man in the state of Sonora – on the border with the United States – for Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán’s organization,” the statement added. Sabori Cisneros is accused of the kidnapping and murder in 2010 of two police officers from Sonora (in western Mexico), whose bodies were found this year, and also of killing a member of the musical group Los Alazanes [The sorrel horses] in 2008. Since his escape from prison ten years ago, Guzmán has achieved control of the Sinaloa cartel, considered the most important of the seven that operate in Mexico, and a spot on Forbes magazine’s list of the world’s richest and most influential men. Disputes between his organization and other cartels, according to the government, led to 34,600 deaths between December 2006 and 2010. At least 3,000 deaths this year should be added to that total, independent tallies published periodically by the Mexican daily newspapers agree. By Dialogo April 21, 2011last_img read more

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Australia turns to idled factories to pull it out of COVID slump

first_imgWhat businesses say is needed longer-term are reforms that reduce energy costs, encourage innovation and cut red tape for investment.Andrew Liveris, former head of U.S. industrial giant Dow Chemicals, returned to his native Australia earlier this year to join Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s manufacturing advisory taskforce.”We have a lot of confusion about how to get investment approved here,” Liveris told Reuters. “So we have to adopt a business-friendly environment to attract foreign direct investment to an economy that can punch above its weight in terms of quality research and quality technologies.”(Re)start your enginesScarred by critical shortages during World War Two, Australia expanded its factory sector in following years, heavily protected by tariffs.By the end of the century, however, production had largely drifted offshore as businesses and politicians embraced globalization’s upsides.In 2019, manufacturing accounted for just 5% of gross domestic product, down from about 25% in 1960, while its share of the labor force has fallen to 7% from 17% in 1984.Liveris said manufacturing should make up closer to 15% to 20% of GDP.While some economists see that as an ambitious target, the shift in thinking has galvanized some early movers.H2X, a startup formed in May, is looking to resurrect local automobile production by making hydrogen cars in Port Kembla, a smelting town about 100km south of Sydney.Brendan Norman, the company’s chief executive who previously worked on hydrogen cars in China, expects a prototype to be ready later this year and production to start in 2022. The operation is looking to employ 100 people by the end of this year, which could ramp up to 5,000 by 2025.Norman said production could use 80% local content by 2024. That bet is based on a belief that Australia already has most of the skills and materials needed to make items such as supercapacitors and fuel cells, even if the manufacturing scale is not there yet.”Australia can certainly compete in this because it is high-tech manufacturing and this is something that we feel we should be able to encourage to come back,” he said.”If we’re producing the bulk of the world’s hydrogen, I’d like to think that we can produce the tools that are required to use it properly.”Scope for reformH2X’s plan relies less on low labor costs that offshore production provides and more on the value of intellectual property, like Germany’s high-tech factory sector.Visy Industries, a recycling and packaging company, expanded into glass manufacturing in a deal worth almost A$1 billion ($730.80 million).That move comes as China’s recent curbs on waste imports forces Australia to come up with innovative ways of dealing with its garbage.One of the central proposals of the manufacturing taskforce is to lower energy costs by boosting distribution.Australian businesses are paying about 50% more for natural gas than its export customers, the country’s competition watchdog said.Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said last week that policies that foster entrepreneurship and cut red tape will be key in next month’s national budget.Tony Shepherd, former chairman of infrastructure firm Transfield Services, said Australia needed to use the crisis to better streamline investment policies across the multiple layers of government.”We couldn’t even produce the basic medical supplies and we were worried about toilet paper,” he said, referring to the panic buying of toilet tissue earlier this year. “If that isn’t enough of a wake up call for politicians to get going, I don’t know what is.”  Topics : Behind the pivot is a realization that Australia has been too reliant on Asia for the supply of essential goods. A recent worsening in relations with China, Australia’s biggest trading partner, has only strengthened that view.”If you look at it over time, we have been running down our manufacturing and we’re at this point of inflexion – we’re saying maybe we shouldn’t be doing that,” said Drew Woodhouse, a Sydney-based consultant at Bain & Company who looks at supply chain issues.For many, the coronavirus has shown that the benefits of globalization, namely low tariffs and cheap labor, are limited when the world economy grinds to a halt.That has prompted many in the industry to seriously consider bringing operations onshore, even if it means some costs go up.center_img In 2017, the last car Australia built rolled out of a General Motors’ plant in the city of Adelaide, ending seven decades of local automotive history and the belief that the country’s factories could ever compete globally.Three years later, policymakers are once again looking to manufacturing to generate some growth as they scramble to drive the economy through the coronavirus and out of its deepest slump on record.While Australians are unlikely to buy millions of locally made cars, refrigerators and toasters as they did in the 20th century, a government push that puts manufacturing at the center of its longer-term recovery plan has strong industry support and has kindled ventures that would have seemed far-fetched half a year earlier.last_img read more

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Jedrzejczyk hospitalised after losing to Weili in UFC 248 classic

first_img Loading… Read Also: BREAKING: Adesanya beats Romero by unanimous decision, defends UFC middleweight title But the warriors continued on until the final bell in a displays of grit, skill and pure guts. Joanna Jedrzejczyk was left hospitalised with a horrifyingly huge hematoma on her forehead after defeat to Zhang Weili at UFC 248. The Chinese warrior, who was also taken to hospital afterwards, retained her strawweight title via split decision after a fight widely-acclaimed to be have been greatest female MMA battle ever. Joanna Jedrzejczyk was left with a huge hematoma on her forehead after defeat to Zhang Weili at UFC 248 UFC president Dana White led the plaudits afterwards, tweeting “F***ing incredible fight!” The Polish challenger’s forehead began to swell in the third round and by the fourth the lump had swollen even more. Zhang Weili retained her strawweight title via split decision after a fight widely-acclaimed to be have been greatest female MMA battle eveAdvertisement Both stars bodies showed the fierceness of the clash post-fight – but it was Jedrzejczyk grotesquely swollen head that had everyone talking. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted Content20 Facts That’ll Change Your Perception Of “The Big Bang Theory”8 Superfoods For Growing Hair Back And Stimulating Its GrowthWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?6 Interesting Ways To Make Money With A DroneBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s HystericalYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of AnimeThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreSome Impressive And Almost Shocking Robots That Exist9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A Tattoo7 Facts About Black Holes That Will Blow Your MindThe 9 Best Robots In Movie Historylast_img read more

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Nancy Carey

first_imgNancy Carey, RN, CCM, 61 of Carmel, Indiana passed away on Sunday, April 8, 2018 surrounded by her loving family.   Nancy was born on August 18, 1956 to Bob and Mary Stewart in Batesville, Indiana.  She graduated from Batesville High School in 1974 and then earned her BSN from the Indiana University School of Nursing.Nancy is survived by her husband of twelve years, David Carey and siblings Kay, George and Ann Stewart.   Her two sons, Stuart and his wife Andrea of Carmel, Indiana and Nicholas Flannery of Houston, Texas as well as two step sons, Neil Carey of Gardnerville, Nevada and Sean Carey of Indianapolis, Indiana plus six grandchildren.Visitation will be Saturday, April 14th from 11:00AM until 2:00PM, immediately followed by a 2:00PM Memorial Service, all at Meyers Funeral Home in Batesville, IN.In lieu of flowers the family requests that you help support the Nancy J. Carey nursing scholarship fund (Batesville High School) by donating at any PNC bank location in the name of “Nurse Nancy’s Legacy”.  For full obituary see www.meyersfuneralhomes.com.last_img read more

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