ARMAGH PLAYER PHONES DONEGAL CAMP TO SAY: “I’M SORRY”

first_imgARMAGH player Aaron Findon has called Donegal team doctor Dr Kevin Moran to apologise for the attack which left the medic on the ground at Croke Park.The incident – part of a series of ‘sledging’ incidents – marred Donegal’s clash with the Orchard County on Sunday.Donegal Daily columnist Cathal Mac Suibhne described the Armagh tactics as “childish” – remarking that one incident at half-time when Armagh players launched an unprovoked verbal assault on Karl Lacey was typical of some of the Armagh behaviour. One skirmish started by Armagh during the match – broadcast to Britain on Sky Sports – lasted two minutes.Findon was yellow carded for the incident involving Dr Moran.Findon attacks Doctor MoranWe now understand that Findon has apologised now TWICE for the incident amid reports he may face further action from GAA HQ at Croke Park.The apology has been accepted. The pushing incident has sparked a national debate – not least between pundit Joe Brolly and RTE’s Des Cahill, with the latter slamming the Derry man for his ‘belittling’ of the incident. Donegal squeezed past Armagh by a point in a thrilling encounter at Croke Park.Thankfully no Donegal players responded to the ‘sledging’ by the Armagh players. ARMAGH PLAYER PHONES DONEGAL CAMP TO SAY: “I’M SORRY” was last modified: August 11th, 2014 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Aaron Findonall-irelandDr Kevin Moranpushlast_img read more

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Men’s Soccer Falls At No. 14 Loyola, 4-0

first_img CHICAGO – The No. 14 Loyola Ramblers shutout the Drake University men’s soccer team, 4-0, Saturday, Oct. 8 night in Missouri Valley Conference action at Loyola Soccer Park. PDF Box Score The Bulldogs finished the second half with four shot attempts as senior Ben LeMay (Hugo, Minn.) recorded their only shot on goal in the game with an attempt that was saved by Loyola goalkeeper, Andrew Chekadanov, at the 77:08 mark.   Full Schedule Roster HTML Box Score Drake (3-8-0, 0-3-0 MVC) tallied two shots in the first half. Senior James Wypych (Wellington, New Zealand) sent a header wide of the net at the 29:04 mark and freshman Antonio Sanchez (Coralville, Iowa) had his shot blocked at the 35:02 mark. Story Links Bradley 10/11/2016 – 7 PM Loyola (10-1-0, 4-0-0 MVC) scored quickly as the Ramblers went on the scoreboard in the fifth minute with Alec Lasinski’s goal off an assist from Grant Stoneman. Preview With the score 1-0 in favor of Loyola, the second half started with back-to-back fouls on Drake before the Ramblers broke through for their goal as Elliot Collier scored at the 52:09 mark. Later Loyola added a goal in the 70th minute (70:06) from Ryan Walker and another goal off a converted penalty kick by Kyle Thomson in the 72nd minute (72:51). Live Stats Next Game: “We didn’t put our best foot forward tonight especially conceding early in the game against a very good team,” said head coach Gareth Smith. “This is not an easy place to play and Loyola showed why they are ranked. Tonight we were exposed in areas that we need to grow and improve and will need to regroup quickly in preparation for Tuesday game against Bradley. Hopefully we can get a few of our starters back and be able to put our strongest lineup out more consistently as this will help us tighten up on some of the areas we were lacking tonight.” Drake returns to Des Moines to host Bradley on Oct. 11 with first kick scheduled for 7 p.m.Print Friendly Versionlast_img read more

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Durant’s brother posts cryptic comment — what does he know about KD’s plans?

first_imgAnother day, another 237 conspiracy theories purporting to indicate Kevin Durant’s desire to leave the Warriors after this season.Today’s pick of the litter is a comment made by Durant’s brother on an Instagram post that is being taken as a sign KD will set up shop ABH (Anywhere But Here) next summer.Here’s the would-be smoking post from a certain tdurant, juxtaposed against a photo of the Warriors showing off their rings before Tuesday night’s season opener. “Yessir, …last_img

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Even Your Trash Can Is High-Tech

first_imgCells have the same problem as cities: disposing of trash.  Each of your cells has elaborate trash collector machines that not only dispose of damaged or unneeded proteins – they recycle them, too.  The structure of the proteasome, a fragile machine difficult to crystallize for imaging, has just become clearer thanks to researchers in Germany and Switzerland who reported their findings in PNAS.1  Here are some of the details of what happens: Unlike constitutively active proteases, the proteasome has the capacity to degrade almost any protein, yet it acts with exquisite specificity.  The key stratagem is self-compartmentalization: The active sites of the proteolytic 20S core particles (Cps) are sequestered from the cellular environment in the interior of this barrelshaped subcomplex.  Proteins destined for degradation are marked by a polyubiquitin chain, a degradation signal that is recognized by the 19S regulatory particles (Rps) that bind to either one or both ends of the CP to form the 26S holocomplex.  The Rps (i) recognize the polyubiquitylated substrates, (ii) trim and recycle the polyubiquitin chains, (iii) unfold substrates to be degraded, and (iv) open the gate to the CP and assist in substrate translocation into the interior of the CP.  These tasks are performed by a complex machinery involving at least 19 different subunits, 6 AAA-ATPases (Rpt1?6), and 13 non-ATPases (Rpn1?3, Rpn5?13, Rpn15/Sem1p).In plain English, the barrel-shaped machine recognizes trash by chemical tags that have been put on them.  A special lid reads these tags of ubiquitin, takes them off, unfolds the trash protein, opens a special lid, and stuffs it inside, where the innards take the amino acids apart for recycling.  This is all done by “complex machinery” with 19 parts, 6 that spend ATP for energy, and 13 that don’t.  This machine “has the capacity to degrade almost any protein, yet it acts with exquisite specificity,” they said.    Their model image of the 26S proteasome looks a bit like one of those old PEZ candy dispensers, with a hinged lid, only much more elaborate.  From the top, the lid looks like a six-sided spiral.  All around this lid are functioning parts: a protein that recognizes the ubiquitin tag, another complex that takes the tags off for recycling, parts that open the lid, parts that pull the trash inside, and then the core complex (barrel) where the degradation takes place.  What happens inside remains a mystery.  They said that some parts undergo large conformational changes (moving parts) during operation, and some portions are “highly conserved” (unevolved) in eukaryotes.  The authors said nothing about evolution.    As is common these days, the authors spoke of this system as “machinery”.  Some evolutionists complain about the machine language, claiming it is “unfortunate and misleading.”  David Tyler addressed this issue on Uncommon Descent, asking, “Are machine-information metaphors bad for science?” 1.  Bohn, Beck et al, “Structure of the 26S proteasome from Schizosaccharomyces pombe at subnanometer resolution,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences published online before print November 22, 2010, doi: 10.1073/pnas.1015530107.Your cells go green!  They have recycle barrels just like the ones you put on the street, except these are motorized, pull the trash inside, and do the recycling on the spot.  They don’t let in good proteins, because the quality-control system has put special tags on the trash that the proteasome has to read before acting on it.  It’s all part of an elaborate recycling system.    Evolutionary theory was useless to this discovery, just like it is to every careful inspection of the details of cellular machinery.  “In eukaryotic cells, most proteins in the cytosol and the nucleus are regulated via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and malfunctions of this pathway have been implicated in a wide variety of diseases,” the authors said.  My, wonder how life got along before Tinker Bell came up with this series of mutations, enough to build 19 exquisite protein parts working together as a system, when getting just one usable protein is astronomically improbable (see online book).(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Fearsome-Looking Terror Bird May Have Been Vegan

first_imgYou can’t judge a book by it’s cover.  In the same way, you can’t assume a large extinct bird with a huge beak was a terror-raising predator.Scientists have judged the so-called Terror Bird (Gastornis, formerly Diatryma) by its large, sharp beak and two-meter height.  They imagined it hunting down small mammals trying to evolve after the extinction of the dinosaurs some 55 to 40 million years ago.  Science Daily said,“The terror bird was thought to have used its huge beak to grab and break the neck of its prey, which is supported by biomechanical modelling of its bite force,” says Dr Thomas Tütken, from the University of Bonn. “It lived after the dinosaurs became extinct and at a time when mammals were at an early stage of evolution and relatively small; thus, the terror bird was though [sic] to have been a top predator at that time on land.”Now, however, a new study of its bones shows it was probably a herbivore.  German scientists measured isotopes in the bones of a specimen and found that “the calcium isotope compositions of terror bird bones are similar to those of herbivorous mammals and dinosaurs and not carnivorous ones,” they announced at the Goldschmidt Conference in Florence Aug. 29.  Additional work will be needed to confirm the new conclusion.  Will it be renamed the Peace Bird?This report about a German fossil concurs with one last year (11/23/12) based on evaluation of the beak, claws and legs of an American species.  It’s an ongoing warning to avoid jumping to conclusions by initial impressions or preferences: as one scientist admitted last year, “Let’s be honest: scary, fierce meat-eaters attract a lot more attention than gentle herbivores.” (Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Big Leak in Universal Common Ancestor Theory

first_img(Visited 106 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Evolutionists speculating about the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) begin with lots of L.U.C.K.Without doubt, ATP synthase is one of the most astonishing and elegant nano-machines of the cell, a proton-powered rotary engine pumping out life’s energy currency nonstop (see animations at CMI and Evolution News).  How it could have arisen by blind, unguided processes is rarely addressed in the origin-of-life community.  Nick Lane, a biochemist at University College London, has a knack for oversimplifying the problem.  A few years ago (8/11/10), we saw him shocking a colleague by dismissively stating, “all that the cells need to do to generate ATP is to plug an ATPase through the membrane” as if that was a cakewalk.  Last year he quipped, “Life is, in effect, a side-reaction of an energy-harnessing reaction” (2/13/13).  Now, he’s done it again; he and his colleagues just assume that ATP synthase showed up when it was needed to plug up a leaky cell.In PLoS Biology, Nick Lane and two colleagues model how the last universal common ancestor (LUCA) might have split into two kingdoms, bacteria and archaea (eukaryotes came later, they speculate, from a merger of the two).  They actually begin further back, when the first life was trying to emerge from a hydrothermal vent.  In that scenario, protons or sodium ions might have provided a steady energy source across the original membrane (wherever that came from).  As LUCA tried to swim free, though, it needed to harness its energy production.  Richard Robinson explains the situation in a companion article on PLoS Biology:In modern cells, the proton gradients that drive ATP synthesis are generated by proton pumps in the membrane [primarily ATP synthase]. However, like the membranes themselves, these pumps differ in archaea and bacteria. One possibility is that LUCA could have used proton gradients but not generated them itself and therefore might have relied on natural proton gradients [like hydrothermal vents]. However, that leads straight to another problem. The influx of protons down a natural gradient can’t go on forever, or even very long, since the buildup of positive charge halts the electrostatic drive behind the process—hence, the authors reasoned, the value of a leaky membrane.In a nutshell, Nick Lane’s team figured that LUCA had a leaky membrane that allowed some protons to leak in and out, but ATP synthase engines embedded in the membrane kept the gradient going.  As the two kingdoms went separate ways, they took their proton pumps with them.But wait!  Where did the ATP synthase come from?  They had just talked about natural proton gradients, like hot fluids from a hydrothermal vent flowing into alkaline ocean water.  Did the molecular motor appear out of nowhere—as if by magic?  Apparently.  Robinson doesn’t bat an eye as he watches it emerge:As a source of proton gradients, LUCA most likely relied on naturally occurring pH differences like those found in the oceans, where alkaline fluids seep from deep sea vents into relatively acidic seawater. The model they built then posited a cell in contact with a constant flow of protons on one side (from seawater), a constant flow of alkaline fluid on the other (potentially from a vent), and a leaky membrane containing an ATP synthase. They found that with a 3-unit pH gradient (i.e., a 1000-fold concentration gradient of protons) and the ATP synthase comprising 1% of the membrane, the cell could drive synthesis of ATP.We’re reminded of what David Nicholls said in 2010, commenting on this kind of audacity found in Lane’s book with the audacious title Science, Power, Sex, Suicide: Mitochondria and the Meaning of Life.  That’s where Lane gave the statement, “all the cell needs to do to generate ATP is to plug an ATPase through the membrane.”  Nicholls remarked,Any bioenergeticist who has followed the elucidation of the extraordinary structure and mechanism of the mitochondrial ATP synthase over the past decade will pause at the word ‘all,’ because the ATP synthase—with its spinning rotor massaging the surrounding subunits to generate ATP—is without doubt the most amazingly complex molecular structure in the cell.There’s an old joke about three guys on an island trying to open a tuna can.  The last one suggests, “Assume a can opener.”  Just like that, Nick Lane has assumed an ATP synthase, the “most amazingly complex molecular structure in the cell” showed up in LUCA’s membrane to keep the proton gradients going.  Or maybe it recalls Sidney Harris’s cartoon of a student writing a complex derivation on the blackboard, including a step, “Then a miracle happens.”  Unlike the professor in the cartoon who insists the student elaborate on that step, Robinson didn’t mind Lane’s leap of faith.  Maybe some science reporters did.  Let’s check:“The difference in the concentration of protons across these two environments enabled protons to flow into the cell, driving the production of a molecule called adenosine triphosphate (ATP) which powered the growth of cells, just as it does today.” (press release from University College London; they might be expected to promote their own guy’s views)“This drives the production of a molecule called adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which makes modern-day cells grow” (The Daily Mail, UK)“Our ancestor’s ‘leaky’ membrane answers big questions in biology” (The Jersey Tribune)“Meet your maker: Homing in on the ancestor of all life” (New Scientist)A search on “Ancestor’s ‘leaky’ membrane‘ shows this story echoed around the world on 13,800 websites—doubtless without critique—in a spirit of rejoicing at this marvelous advance in modern science’s ability to describe life’s earliest progress.A darling of BBC News science programs, Nick Lane gets away with murdering scientific rigor.  With a sweep of his hand, ATP synthase appears, simply because life needed a permanent way to keep its energy production going.  This is worse than “assume a can opener.”  It’s assuming a Ferrari.Where are the philosophers?  Where are the logicians?  Where is anybody with respect for truth?  Why do these sophoxymoroniacs get a pass in the world’s media?  Is it because they know how to work differential equations and speak jargon?  Is it because they seem so confident and charismatic?  Is it because universal evolutionary common ancestry is modernity’s substitute religion?  That’s it: “Meet your maker,” New Scientist says.  Our modern institutions long ago ousted the God of creation from their minds and hearts.  Since nature abhors a vacuum, they filled that God-shaped void with an idol named LUCA, who gives life to all things, from whom all blessings flow.Except for the western clothes and jargon, Nick Lane is no different than a shaman in the jungle holding his tribe captive with great-sounding words of wisdom, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.  “The last common ancestor of all life was not a free-living cell at all, but a porous rock riddled with bubbly iron-sulphur membranes that catalysed primordial biochemical reactions,” he whispers over the campfire, his captives listening wide-eyed at every holy word (10/19/09, #3).  The prophets in the media dutifully dumb down the prophecy to the surrounding villages: “Our oldest ancestor was a proton-powered rock.”  Ooh!  Aah.  Such wisdom.  How much better off we are since we boiled the Christian missionary in the pot!last_img read more

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Premier Foods expands into Swaziland

first_img“Following our transaction with Brait last year, we are now in a position to carry-out our strategy to actively participate in new sub-Saharan markets where we can acquire and grow assets aligned with our existing products and operations,” said Visser. In addition to gaining ownership of leading Swazi bread brand Supreme, Premier Foods also intends to introduce the Blue Ribbon brand, which is the company’s biggest bread brand in South Africa. Levendale added that it was pleasing to see that Swaziland’s economic woes did not deter essential foreign direct investment that supports Swazi ownership. The acquisition will give Premier Foods – which is known for brands such as Iwisa maize meal, Snowflake flour and Blue Ribbon bread – a major foothold in the market, as the two businesses it is buying command a 75% share of Swaziland’s bread market when combined. “These acquisitions fit perfectly with our investment criteria and we look forward to working closely with the management team to develop high quality but affordable products for the Swazi market,” Premier Foods group CEO Ian Visser said in a statement this week. Levendale said that the investment would bring several benefits including much-needed access to expertise in terms of improved technology, product quality and transfer of skills. 22 February 2012 South African staple foods manufacturer Premier Foods has acquired a controlling stake in two Swaziland-based bread and confectionary businesses, Mr Bread and Swaziland United Bakeries, for R85-million. This resulted in Premier Foods gaining improved access to capital for investments focused on the development of new products, capacity expansions and strategic mergers & acquisitions in new sub-Saharan markets.center_img Active sub-Saharan expansion Transfer of technology, skills Premier Foods will support the businesses technically and strategically to strengthen their market position. Wayne Levendale, currently MD of Mr Bread, will become CEO of the joint operations and will retain a major shareholding together with other key members of staff. “As a result, consumers can expect a better service through an improved delivery network and the introduction of new product ranges including high-end confectionary products at affordable prices,” he explained. In July last year, international investment group Brait increased its stake in Premier Foods to become a long-term strategic shareholder with a view to support Premier Foods’ next phase of growth. Premier Foods has been operating, in one form or another, since 1852 and currently operates 10 bakeries, five wheat mills, one maize mill and 16 distribution depots nationwide, employing over 5 000 people in manufacturing, distribution and marketing operations. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Eastern Cape schools roll-out continues

first_img27 August 2013 Basic Education Deputy Minister Enver Surty attended the handing over of Mqokolweni Senior Primary School to the community of Dikela location in the Libode district in the Eastern Cape on Friday. The new school was built under the Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery Initiative, a national programme to tackle school infrastructure backlogs in the country. The R8.2-billion public-private programme aims to eradicate the 496 “mud schools” in the country, provide water and sanitation to 1 257 schools and electricity to 878 schools by March 2016. The Eastern Cape has been prioritised under the programme, which will see about 50 new schools being built to accommodate more than 10 000 learners in the province. Educators and learners at Mqokolweni Senior Primary say the new school has made learning and teaching convenient. Learners will now be able to get computer lessons on laptops in fully equipped computer laboratories. The standard facilities in all the new schools include a multi-purpose centre, library, science lab, dedicated Grade R centre, decent sanitation facilities and administration block. Speaking at Friday’s handover, Surty said the government had made education an “apex priority”, adding that what had once been a bleak prospect was now a promising future. He encouraged the learners to make the best possible use of their brand new facilities. The Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery Initiative is now one of the programmes overseen by the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Council. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

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Honeypreet Insan, adopted daughter of Dera Sacha Sauda chief Gurmeet Ram Rahim, arrested

first_imgHoneypreet Insan, the adopted daughter of Dera Sacha Sauda chief Gurmeet Ram Rahim, was arrested on Tuesday in Punjab. She was wanted by the Haryana police for her alleged role in inciting violence in Panchkula on August 25, after Ram Rahim was convicted in two counts of rape by a special CBI court.“Ms. Honeypreet has been arrested from near Zirakpur in Punjab [on the Zirakpur-Patiala road] by our team and would be produced in the court tomorrow,” said Panchkula Commissioner of Police, A. S. Chawla.“We need to investigate her role behind the Panchkula violence on August 25 and hence we will seek her police remand.”The Panchkula police had booked Honeypreet, among others, for allegedly inciting violence and rioting in the town. Police had issued a lookout notice for Honeypreet, who is also facing allegations of an attempt to help Ram Rahim escape when he was brought outside the Panchkula Court complex after conviction.The Haryana police had been hunting for her since August 25.Honeypreet had accompanied the Dera chief to Sunaria jail in Rohtak – the same day, by helicopter after his conviction and since then she has been in hiding.The violence in Haryana left 41 people dead and injured over 250.last_img read more

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Burning both ends: many young girls in Murshidabad are child labourers

first_imgLast year, Khatoon, 13, dropped out of school to earn for her poor family. She now rolls bidis 12 to 14 hours a day, making ₹120. She places tobacco flakes inside a tendu leaf and cuts it into a small rectangular piece. Her tender fingers roll it down and tie it with a thread. She then tucks one end with a small iron rod, and a bidi is ready. Her daily output is 1,000 sticks. Khatoon has developed back pain, working seated for several hours together. To avoid taking a break, she skips meals and water.This is the story of almost every young girl in Murshidabad district of West Bengal, India’s largest bidi-rolling centre. It was in the 1990s that the industry here moved from factories to homes, opening the door to child labour.A survey carried out in 1999 by the office of the Deputy Labour Commissioner estimated three lakh to four lakh bidi workers in Murshidabad, a majority in the Jangipur sub-divison, where 90% are women and children working from home. Things have not changed much.Mothers teach their daughters how to roll a bidi from the age of five. Before they attain puberty, the girls have mastered the work. Most bidi workers admit their children to school, but a majority of the girls drop out after primary school to supplement their family’s meagre income. With constant exposure to tobacco, the girls contract tuberculosis and asthma and complain of frequent chest pain, cough, giddiness, eye infections and headaches. There is only one hospital in the district, which gives free treatment to workers with bidi cards.Children in India 2012: A Statistical Appraisal reported that the pan, bidi or cigarette sectors employ most (21% or 2.66 million) of India’s 12.66 million child workers (Census 2001) in the age group of five to 14. No official estimates of child labour in the bidi industry are available at present. Unofficial estimates by trade unions and various researchers say children make up 25% to 40% of the bidi industry workforce. They estimate 1.5 lakh to 3 lakh child bidi workers in the Jangipur sub-division alone.(Text and images by Masood Sarwer , who is a freelance photographer based in Delhi)last_img read more

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