Eddie Vedder Joins Tom Petty And The Heartbreakers, On This Day In 2006

first_imgIt was 14 years ago today that Pearl Jam’s Eddie Vedder joined forces with Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers in Denver, CO for a rendition of “The Waiting” from the rocker’s 1981 album Hard Promises. Over the years, Vedder and Petty have found themselves on stage together quite a few times, but this was certainly one of those memorable performances from the two rock legends. Check out video below, courtesy of Release Coalition:last_img

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Dickey Betts Compares Himself To Tiger Woods In New Promo Clip From ‘The Big Interview’ [Watch]

first_imgAllman Brothers guitarist and singer Dickey Betts stars as the interview subject in a forthcoming episode of The Big Interview, where he’ll sit down with journalist Dan Rather to discuss his return to performing following his 2014 retirement, amongst many other topics. The first clip from the pre-recorded interview was shared on Wednesday and shows an optimistic 75-year-old Betts comparing himself to Tiger Woods of all people.“I missed it,” Betts confidently tells Rather about picking up the guitar again. “I’d just done it so long, you know. [I was] 70 and I thought ‘I’m just going to play golf and go fishing,’ you know, enjoying myself.”Betts co-founded the Allman Brothers in 1969 and was even fired from the group in 2000 as a result of his alcohol abuse. In addition to forming the band, Betts also wrote some of their most well-known songs during his time in the famous southern rock group, including “Jessica” and “Ramblin’ Man”. The past two years, however, have been tough for Allman Brothers fans, as drummer Butch Trucks and guitarist Gregg Allman both passed away, while Betts suffered a stroke back in August. Betts was again admitted to the hospital after suffering a freak head injury at his Florida home just a few weeks after the mini-stroke. He’ll be celebrating his 75th birthday on Wednesday at his home in Florida while he continues to regain his full strength.“I feel kind of like Tiger Woods you know,” He continued saying in the interview clip, which can be watched below. “Coming back after four-and-a-half years, I’m really trying to play par.”The full interview between Betts and Rather will premiere on AXS TV next Tuesday, Dec. 18th at 9 p.m. EST.Devon Allman and Duane Betts also recently announced the formation of a new group, The Allman Betts Band. The band will release their debut album next spring to go along with a world tour. Both Devon and Duane are currently on the road through February 2019 as The Devon Allman Project, with the younger Betts as the special guest. Tickets for the ongoing 2018-2019 tour for those shows can be found here.Dickey Betts and Dan Rather – The Big Interview – Teaser Clip[Video: AXS TV]last_img read more

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Bob Weir And Wolf Bros Welcome Kenny Brooks, Debut Songs At Intimate Blue Note Shows [Full Pro-Shot Video]

first_imgOn Monday, Bob Weir and Wolf Bros played a pair of last-minute shows at New York City’s intimate Blue Note Jazz Club, utilizing a few days off in the band’s touring schedule. Weir, Don Was, and Jay Lane announced the surprise shows on Sunday afternoon, giving fans a chance to enter a lottery system with a short window of time. Grateful Dead fans spotted bassist Phil Lesh and his son Grahame (Lesh) in the 200-capacity club, which was full of a very attentive group of attendees due in part to Blue Note’s no cell phone policy.Bob Weir and Wolf Bros opened up their first set with “Dark Star”, ultimately weaving in and out of the tune for the entirety of their early set. The trio then invited up longtime Weir collaborator and RatDog saxophonist Kenny Brooks for a jam on John Coltrane‘s “A Love Supreme” before continuing to weave in and out of “Dark Star”, throwing covers of Little Willie John’s “Fever” and Little Feat’s “Easy To Slip” in the mix.Transitioning back into their three-piece configuration, Wolf Bros dove back into “Dark Star”, which was followed up by “Playing In The Band”, a “Supplication” jam, and a take on Bob Dylan‘s “When I Paint My Masterpiece”. Bob Weir and Wolf Bros invited Kenny Brooks back up for the remainder of their early show as they transitioned back into “Supplication” terriory before finally closing out “Dark Star” and reprising “Playing In The Band” to bring the 75-minute set to a close. The four-piece delivered a lone encore with “Ripple” to send their early show crowd packing.Following a break, Weir, Lane, and Was reemerged to open their late show with “Eternity”, a Weir and Rob Wasserman collaboration that had not been in Weir’s live repertoire for more than a decade until he dusted it off on Wolf Bros inaugural tour in 2018. Kenny Brooks joined the band for an improvisational take on “Bird Song”, before the band hopped back into their three-piece format as they moved forward with Bob Dylan’s “Most Of The Time”, “New Speedway Boogie”, and the Bob Weir and Wolf Bros debut of “Morning Dew”. Brooks reemerged to help the band close out their late show with “Not Fade Away”. Weir, Lane, and Was were still basking  in the energy of their set-closer as the trio took the stage to open up their encore with a reprise of “Not Fade Away”, which was followed up by another Wolf Bros debut, “Oh Boy!”, a song made popular by Buddy Holly in the late 1950s.Watch pro-shot video of both of Bob Weir and Wolf Bros’ Blue Note Jazz Club sets below via Nugs.tv:Bob Weir and Wolf Bros – 3/11/2019 [Pro-Shot Video][Video: nugsnet]Bob Weir and Wolf Bros are currently in the midst of their 20-date late-winter tour that spans through March 30th. Next up for the trio is a two-night run at Red Bank, NJ’s Count Basie Theatre on Wednesday and Thursday, March 13th and 14th.For a full list of the band’s upcoming tour dates and ticketing information, head to Bob Weir’s website.Setlist: Bob Weir and Wolf Bros | Blue Note Jazz Club | New York, NY | 3/11/2019Early Set: Dark Star v1 > A Love Supreme Jam* > Dark Star* > Fever* > Dark Star* > Easy To Slip* > Dark Star, Playing In The Band > Supplication Jam > When I Paint My Masterpiece > Supplication Jam* > Dark Star v2* > Playing In The Band Reprise*Encore: Ripple** – w/ Kenny BrooksLate Set: Eternity > Bird Song*, Most Of The Time, New Speedway Boogie > Morning Dew > Not Fade Away*Encore: Not Fade Away Reprise > Oh Boy!* – w/ Kenny Brookslast_img read more

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Mac DeMarco Gets Grossly Animalistic In New Video For “On The Square” [Watch

first_imgThe boundless, curious mind of Mac DeMarco truly is one of indie rock’s greatest treasures. On Tuesday, the guitarist and singer shared the music video for his latest single, “On The Square”, a drowsy but slightly amusing new track which is presumably set to appear on his forthcoming album, Here Comes The Cowboy.Just as he did in the video for “NOBODY”, DeMarco has recruited a skilled team of makeup and prosthetic artists to mask that handsome mug of his with a gruesome mix of animalistic faces. The video was directed by William Sipos and Sean Campos. It’s the video’s weird storyline courtesy of Catherine Sweet, however, which enables the viewer to continue looking at the screen to follow along, despite the mix of faces which somewhat resemble those seen in that one Twilight Zone episode featuring those grotesque masks.Throughout the 3:40-minute video, viewers are treated to seeing DeMarco in makeup as creatures resembling a pig, the uglier version of Davy Jones from Pirates of the Caribbean, and a shaved cat. The entire cast of characters can be seen in the video below.Mac DeMarco – “On The Square” [Video: Mac DeMarco]DeMarco will join Anderson .Paak for a few shows in Texas next month as part of .Paak’s Best Teef in the Game Tour. Fans can head to Mac’s website for ticket info to all his upcoming 2019 performances.Here Comes the Cowboy is scheduled to arrive on May 10th via Mac’s Record Label.last_img read more

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Harvard Forest conservation finance initiative seeks to protect water

first_imgThe Massachusetts Environmental Trust (MET), one of the largest funding sources in Massachusetts for water quality projects, recently conferred a $25,000 grant to Harvard’s center for research and education in forestry and ecology, the Harvard Forest.The grant signals a new understanding of the links between preserving forest landscapes and strengthening freshwater resources in the Commonwealth, and will help Harvard Forest researchers develop new, more effective methods to finance forest conservation. Two major conservation finance prospects have already been identified: the aggregation and protection of adjacent conservation areas as large, intact watersheds, and the use of mitigation (or offset) mechanisms to fund new protection for public and privately owned land in the state.Funding Harvard Forest’s initiative is only one step in the MET’s acknowledgement of the critical linkage between land protection and water resource security.The Harvard Forest’s finance study for forest conservation is led by James Levitt, director of the Program on Conservation Innovation at the Harvard Forest and research fellow at the Harvard Kennedy School’s Ash Institute for Democratic Governance and Innovation. Levitt is working on this project in conjunction with David Foster, director of the Harvard Forest and faculty member in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology.last_img read more

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Around the Schools: Harvard Law School

first_imgHarvard Law School is losing a faculty member to the federal government, even as it regains one.Laurence Tribe ’66, the Carl M. Loeb University Professor at Harvard, has been named senior counselor for access to justice in the Department of Justice, and he will lead an initiative aimed at improving access to civil and criminal legal services.Justice Department officials say they hope the initiative will elevate the importance of legal access issues and help prompt concrete steps to address them. The primary focus of the initiative will be to improve indigent defense, enhance the delivery of legal services to the poor and middle class, and identify and promote alternatives to court-intensive and lawyer-intensive solutions.In another development, Jody Freeman returns to the School’s faculty this month, after serving in the White House as counselor for energy and climate change for more than a year.Freeman, a leading scholar of administrative and environmental law, will be appointed to an endowed chair in public law named for former Solicitor General and Watergate special prosecutor Archibald Cox Jr. She will work at the School and across the University to harness Harvard’s talents and resources toward shaping global energy policy. The professor will also resume her role as director of the School’s Environmental Law Program, which she founded in 2006. ­If you have an item for Around the Schools, please e-mail your write-up (150-200 words) to georgia_bellas@harvard.edu.last_img read more

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How touch can influence judgments

Psychologists report in the journal Science that interpersonal interactions can be shaped, profoundly yet unconsciously, by the physical attributes of incidental objects: Resumes reviewed on a heavy clipboard are judged to be more substantive, while a negotiator seated in a soft chair is less likely to drive a hard bargain.The research was conducted by psychologists at Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Yale University. The authors say the work suggests that physical touch — the first of our senses to develop — may continue to operate throughout life like a scaffold upon which people build their social judgments and decisions.“Touch remains perhaps the most underappreciated sense in behavioral research,” said co-author Christopher C. Nocera, a graduate student in Harvard’s Department of Psychology. “Our work suggests that greetings involving touch, such as handshakes and cheek kisses, may in fact have critical influences on our social interactions, in an unconscious fashion.”Nocera conducted the research with Joshua M. Ackerman, assistant professor of marketing at MIT’s Sloan School of Management, and John A. Bargh, professor of psychology at Yale.“First impressions are liable to be influenced by the tactile environment, and control over this environment may be especially important for negotiators, pollsters, job seekers, and others interested in interpersonal communication,” the authors wrote in the latest issue of Science. “The use of ‘tactile tactics’ may represent a new frontier in social influence and communication.”The researchers conducted a series of experiments probing how objects’ weight, texture, and hardness can unconsciously influence judgments about unrelated events and situations:— To test the effects of weight, metaphorically associated with seriousness and importance, subjects used either light or heavy clipboards while evaluating resumes. They judged candidates whose resumes were seen on a heavy clipboard as better qualified and more serious about the position, and rated their own accuracy at the task as more important.— An experiment testing texture’s effects had participants arrange rough or smooth puzzle pieces before hearing a story about a social interaction. Those who worked with the rough puzzle were likelier to describe the interaction in the story as uncoordinated and harsh.— In a test of hardness, subjects handled either a soft blanket or a hard wooden block before being told an ambiguous story about a workplace interaction between a supervisor and an employee. Those who touched the block judged the employee as more rigid and strict.— A second hardness experiment showed that even passive touch can shape interactions. Subjects seated in hard or soft chairs engaged in mock haggling over the price of a new car. Subjects in hard chairs were lessflexible, showing less movement between successive offers. They also judged their adversaries in the negotiations as more stable and less emotional.Nocera and his colleagues say these experiments suggest that information acquired through touch exerts broad, if generally imperceptible, influence over cognition. They propose that encounters with objects can elicit a “haptic mindset,” triggering application of associated concepts even to unrelated people and situations.“People often assume that exploration of new things occurs primarily through the eyes,” Nocera said. “While the informative power of vision is irrefutable, this is not the whole story. For example, the typical reaction to an unknown object is usually as follows: With an outstretched arm and an open hand, we ask, ‘Can I see that?’ Thisresponse suggests the investigation is not limited to vision, but rather the integrative sum of seeing, feeling, touching, and manipulating the unfamiliar object.”Nocera said that because touch appears to be the first sense that people use to experience the world ╤ for example, by equating the warm and gentle touch of a mother with comfort and safety ╤ it may provide part ofthe basis by which metaphorical abstraction allows for the development of a more complex understanding of comfort and safety. This physical-to-mental abstraction is reflected in metaphors and shared linguistic descriptors, such as the multiple meanings of words like “hard,” “rough,” and “heavy.”Nocera, Ackerman, and Bargh’s work was supported by the Sloan School of Management at MIT and by the National Institute of Mental Health. read more

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Horns aplenty

first_img ‘Headgear’ Tall, dark, and horned The spiraled horns of the red lechwe, shown here, are quite intimidating and also grow only on males. It’s a long reach from the almost-not-there horns of a giraffe to the massive antler spread of an adult moose. And that is outstripped by the largest-ever span of the extinct Irish elk — which is neither exclusively Irish nor an elk, for those keeping count.That contrivance could reach the rim of a basketball hoop from the ground. At 80 pounds, just imagine carting it around on your head.To help spur the imagination, the Harvard Museum of Natural History (HMNH) has mounted a new exhibit on horns and antlers that examines where they came from, what they’re used for, and their differences. “Headgear: The Natural History of Horns and Antlers” has opened in the museum’s special exhibit space and will run through Jan. 2.Hopi Hoekstra, Loeb Associate Professor of the Natural Sciences and curator in mammology in the Harvard Museum of Comparative Zoology (MCZ), said the exhibit was inspired by the MCZ’s extensive and diverse collection of horns and antlers, spurred somewhat by the impending move of the MCZ’s research collections into new space in the basement of the Northwest Laboratory building.Hoekstra said seeing the collection immediately raises questions that might not be asked if someone was examining less-visible features.“It raises natural questions: What’s the difference between horns and antlers? Why are some bigger? Do both sexes have them?” Hoekstra said. “One thing I love about this exhibit is you’re immediately struck by the diversity and you can’t help but wonder why. That’s what museums do, get people asking questions.”The exhibit, which tells its story through graphic panels and display cases, video, and the exhibit’s stars — animal heads on the walls — doesn’t leave the visitor hanging on the what, when, and why. Horns and antlers arose in a group of mammals called Artiodactyla, which evolved some 55 million years ago and includes deer, cows, moose, sheep, and goats.Though sometimes the words “horn” and “antler” are used interchangeably in everyday speech, they differ. Horns tend not to be branched, are retained year after year, and have a bony core covered by a sheath of hard material called “keratin” (the same substance that makes up our fingernails). Antlers, on the other hand, are usually branched, replaced each year, and made up just of bone, although they have a nourishing, fleshy coat called “velvet” while they grow.In some species, Hoekstra said, both males and females have horns or antlers, and in others just males do. These are mostly used by males in their battles for supremacy and the right to mate with nearby females, but they may also offer protection against predators.HMNH Executive Director Elisabeth Werby said the new exhibit is a good complement to the permanent exhibit on evolution, through which visitors pass to reach “Headgear.”“The number and diversity of specimens in this exhibition offer a new perspective on familiar creatures like deer and sheep and a rare look at some that are more exotic and strange. It’s a unique opportunity to contemplate the process of evolution,” Werby said. How they grow This skull of a Klipspringer, a small antelope, once belonged to a male; only they can grow horns, which can reach up to 6 inches. Wide load This diagram displays the actual size of an Irish elk’s antlers, which regularly surpass 6 feet in width. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer Answering questions Curator of Mammology at the Museum of Comparative Zoology Hopi Hoekstra said that museums get people asking questions — such as what’s the difference between horns and antlers? Come together These beetles, in a Harvard Museum of Natural History display case, show that little guys can have horns, too. Nature’s sculptures Here a selection of antlered specimens captivate and amaze with their strange beauty and variety. Raise your horns The African buffalo’s (bottom) horns curve downwards first, before growing skyward. Branching out Antlers like these are composed of bone — whereas horns are made from keratin, like fingernails. Antlers are typically branched, replaced every year, and have a nourishing, fleshy coat called “velvet” while they grow.last_img read more

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Faculty Council meeting held March 23

first_imgAt its 11th meeting of the year on March 23, the Faculty Council heard a review of the joint A.B./M.M. program with the New England Conservatory.  They also voted to amend the rules concerning study out of residence and to update the faculty’s media policy. Finally, they heard reports on the activities of undergraduates and graduate students during January 2011.The council next meets on April 13. The next meeting of the faculty will take place on April 5. The preliminary deadline for the regular meeting of the faculty on May 3 is April 19.last_img

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NHC names Jason Stevens a fellow

first_imgHarvard Assistant Professor of English Jason Stevens has been named a fellow at the National Humanities Center (NHC) for the upcoming academic year. He will join 31 other distinguished scholars from institutions across the United States and two foreign countries working on a wide array of projects. Stevens is the 20th faculty member from Harvard University to be named an NHC Fellow.For more information.last_img

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