Small role for Bravo as Lions remain unbeaten

first_imgRAJKOT, India (CMC):All-rounder Dwayne Bravo’s unbeaten cameo kept new boys Gujarat Lions unbeaten as they defeated Rising Pune Supergiants by seven wickets with two overs to spare in their Indian Premier League contest here yesterday.Opting for first knock, Supergiants rattled up 163 for five off their 20 overs at the Saurashtra Cricket Association Stadium, with South African opener Faf du Plessis top-scoring with 69 and Englishman Kevin Pietersen getting 37.Captain MS Dhoni chipped in with 22 with opener Ajinkya Rahane getting 21. Left-arm spinner Ravi Jadeja was the best bowler, with two for 18, while Bravo was expensive, conceding 43 runs from his four overs and taking just one wicket.In reply, Australian Aaron Finch blasted 50 from 36 deliveries and Kiwi partner Brendon McCullum, 49 from 31 balls, as they put on 85 off 51 balls for the first wicket.McCullum added a further 35 for the second wicket, with Suresh Raina, who struck a run-a-ball 24, before departing in the 14th over.Bravo then compensated with the bat to make sure there were no stumbles, stroking a fluent unbeaten 22 off 10 balls with three fours and a six to sustain Lions’ momentum.It was his inside-out extra-cover drive for six off seamer Rajat Bhatia that brought the scores level, before a wide off the first ball of the penultimate over saw Lions home.They top the standings with four points from their two games.last_img read more

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All set for tomorrow’s JN Falmouth 5K

first_imgFALMOUTH, Trelawny:While there are a number of 5K events nationally with most held in Kingston, Trelawny will be hoping that their Jamaica National 5K in Falmouth tomorrow to assist the Granville child-care facility in the parish will be a show-stopper.They expect this 5K Run/Walk to be the most picturesque seeing that it will be run through this historic Georgian town, said to be the best laid out in the Caribbean.Mayor of Falmouth, Councillor Garth Wilkinson, has endorsed the event and has hailed his town as among the most beautiful in the Caribbean. He will not only welcome the hundreds who will descend on the town but participate in the event as well.Local athlete and the world’s fastest man, Usain Bolt, will also be in attendance, and most important, will be giving his support to the cause. His foundation will be also contributing to the child-care facility.The event starts at 7 a.m. outside the Pier on Seaboard Street by the Falmouth Street intersection. Participants will then turn right onto Market Street, left to Lower Harbour Street, right to Water Street, left to Rodney Street, left to Cornwall Street and right to Queen Street.There will be a right to Duke Street, left to Wellington Street, then left to Wakeland Drive, left to Princess Street, right to George Street, then right to Queen Street, left to Wakeland Drive, left to King Street, right back to George Street, then left to Market Street along Water Square to Lower Parade Street finishing on Seaboard Street at the same starting point.Some of the sites the participants will go past are Fort Balcarres, now the Falmouth All-Age School; the new Falmouth Police Station,the largest police station in the Caribbean; along with one of the best restored Georgian houses on Duke Street.Other sites are the 220-year-old Anglican Church, the 181-year-old brick Falmouth United Church (Presbyterian Church) and Market Street with its many Georgian buildings.Jamaica National has reported good support for the event, especially from businesses in the parish.last_img read more

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1 in custody as investigation continues

first_imgBy Kizzy ColemanPolice have arrested and are interrogating a man for the murder of the two Region Three (Essequibo Islands-West Demerara) rice farmers who were killed after bandits set their home ablaze on Sunday night.Dead: Mohammed and Bibi MunirBibi Munir, 70, and her husband Mohammed Munir, 77, of Lot 16 Good Hope, East Bank Essequibo (EBE) were killed in the fire following a botched robbery.Speaking with Guyana Times on Tuesday, Crime Chief Wendell Blanhum said that Police have one man in custody who is currently being questioned.Late Sunday evening, pandemonium broke out at Good Hope when several armed men invaded the premises of the two prominent rice farmers and after not being able to gain access to them, torched their house burning them alive.Eyewitnesses said that around 23:15h, gunshots were heard and upon investigation it was discovered that the house of the couple was on fire.Neighbours of the victims ran out of their homes to render assistance to the couple who were heard yelling for help.Residents of Good Hope as well as the Fire Service worked hard to save the couple, but all efforts proved futile as the grilled room that the couple had hidden in caved in trapping them inside.They subsequently burnt to death which the post-mortem examination confirmed.Meanwhile, the Indian Arrival Committee (IAC) in a release called for the haemorrhaging of innocent lives by crime to cease as this incident is the most recent in a spate of crimes in Guyana.The IAC, in forthrightly condemning these latest incidents, called upon the authorities to immediately implement effective security measures to curb these attacks on Guyanese.It is urging the authorities to ensure that security is given more importance as it believes that the fear that continues to be instilled in the hearts of the citizenry can no longer be tolerated.The Committee noted that it has expressed similar sentiments in the past for countermeasures to be implemented as swiftly as possible so as to stop the haemorrhaging of innocent lives.The IAC took the opportunity to express condolences to the immediate family and relatives of the victims and called on civil society to join in its call.Meanwhile, late Tuesday afternoon, Mahendra Persaud, of Wakenaam, Essequibo, lost his life in Georgetown after being attacked and robbed by an armed bandit (see story on page 14). Good Hope fire/homicide– IAC calls for end to haemorrhaging of innocent liveslast_img read more

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Unlicensed driver jailed for 4 years

first_imgEBD fatal accidentThe minibus driver who drove recklessly on April 13, 2018, causing the deaths of 52- year-old Yvonne Mohan and Ramroop Persaud, was on Monday jailed for causing death by dangerous driving.Ronald BalgobinRonald Balgobin, 24, of Sophia, Greater Georgetown admitted to driving minibus BWW 4542 at a fast rate, thereby causing the deaths of both persons.On his first appearance at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts, Balgobin had denied the sole charge against him — that of causing the death of Mohan. However, when he was slapped with the second charge, he admitted to them, explaining what occurred on the day of the accident.According to Balgobin, he was asked by a friend whom he had met on Facebook to drive her bus, and even though unlicensed, he complied.He added that he was transporting only one extra person in the bus when the accident occurred. He further revealed that the accident occurred when he was overtaking a truck behind a car that was overtaking as well.However, the driver of the said car reportedly refused to give him space to return to the correct lane, and as such he was forced to speed up in an attempt to overtake the car when he suffered a blow out. He then lost control of the vehicle, which toppled several times before coming to a stop. In the process, some of the passengers were reportedly thrown from the vehicle.Balgobin and the injured passengers were rushed to the Diamond Diagnostic Centre, where Mohan succumbed. Persaud succumbed to his injuries several days after the accident.On Monday, Balgobin begged for mercy, apologising to the Court for his carelessness. Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan told him that he did not drive with due care, and as such, sentenced him to four years’ imprisonment for each charge. However, the two sentences are to run concurrently.last_img read more

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Prosecutor sees justice even though he’s blind

first_img“When the jury sees that the prosecutor is a blind person, I’ve got their interest,” said Wojdak, who belongs to the 200-member National Association of Blind Lawyers. The Chicago native wasn’t supposed to be a lawyer. Had he not lost his eyesight at 16 – a condition linked to his mother’s bout with the German measles during pregnancy – he would have followed his father and four brothers into the family’s rare-coin business. “You have to be able to see coins in order to tell if they’re real or not,” he said. Although he aspired to a legal career, his blindness made academic work a struggle. He dictated term papers into a tape recorder, then transcribed them on an electric typewriter. He almost dropped out of college because of the pressure. “I thought, `My God, if I can’t do regular college work, how am I going to do my thesis? How am I going to go to law school? How am I going to take the bar?”‘ He took a semester off in 1978, and worked for a political action committee, writing summaries of news stories. He later worked for a Superior Court judge, writing a guide on rules for allowing hearsay evidence in court. Along the way, he became enamored with arguing before a jury. “I wanted to show an employer that I could be a productive employee,” said Wojdak, who graduated from Hastings Law School in San Francisco in 1984. “That was really, I thought, the most critical thing that a sighted person would want to understand, that if they hired me I could actually produce the product a sighted person could.” Armed with glowing recommendations from professors and a district attorney, Wojdak got a job as a county prosecutor. Over the last 22 years, he’s won about 80 percent of his cases, about average for the office. Glendale Police Officer Tracy Lowrey has worked dozens of cases with Wojdak, including one in which a man was convicted of molesting a 13-year-old neighbor. Lowrey said Wojdak develops an instant rapport with victims, especially children, making them comfortable with relaying the most intimate details about a crime. “He’s very conscientious about the cases and he loves what he does,” Lowrey said. Planning is key to Wojdak’s career. His suits and shirts are color coded, using a system of dog tag-like labels. His ties are arranged on a rack, each described in Braille on a note card kept nearby. Before a trial, Wojdak paces off the distance from the prosecution table to the court reporter, the jury box and the judge’s bench so he can move about with confidence. “The jury needs to feel confident that the person who’s asking them to find someone guilty beyond a reasonable doubt is someone that they can rely on, who has his own act together enough,” he said. “If I look waffley and flaky, then they’re not going to find the person guilty based on what I tell them.” Wojdak’s computer is equipped with software that reads his e-mails aloud and tells him the letters he’s typing. He has three assistants; they guide him through courthouse hallways, help him keep track of facts, describe prospective jurors. “Does juror No. 1 seem bored, restless?” said Carly Sutherland, 19, one of the assistants. “If someone doesn’t bring a sweater, it indicates that the person doesn’t plan ahead.” Despite his organization and professional success, Wojdak doesn’t immediately inspire confidence in everyone he meets. One victim wondered aloud whether the blind prosecutor would be able to win a conviction against the men who robbed and raped her in 2004. “I wasn’t sure he could fully represent me as well as someone who could see,” said the 20-year-old woman, who works at a Northridge paint store. After her initial hesitation, she quickly changed her mind. Wojdak listened. He didn’t judge. He called occasionally to tell her he hadn’t forgotten about her as the case dragged on over two and a half years. “It was his tone of voice, the words he used,” the woman said. “He wouldn’t use `rape.’ He was very sensitive. He was always asking if I’m OK. He’d never make me feel pressured.” The men were convicted in December. Defense attorney Jonathan Mandel of Encino, who represented one of the defendants, has a lot of respect for Wojdak. “I think he’s fair and he’s always been straight with me,” he said. “His ability to synthesize and present information is extraordinary when sight is so important in trial work.” jason.kandel@dailynews.com (818) 713-3635 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Wrapping up the loose ends of a case, veteran prosecutor Phil Wojdak needed to verify a witness’ claim of seeing a sexual assault. So he climbed over the kitchen sink of a Glendale apartment, scooted out the window and scaled the slanted roof to get a better feel for the situation. With a detective’s assistance, Wojdak concluded the witness was reliable. The vantage point was clear. Such a meticulous re-creation would be less than remarkable for most hard-working prosecutors – just part of the job. But Wojdak is blind. “I did it so I could understand it, so I could explain it to a jury,” he said of his rooftop exploits, which helped convict a man of sexually assaulting his own son. “I’ve got to go where the crime happens, I suppose.” For 22 years, Wojdak has worked for the Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office. His current assignment is prosecuting elder abuse, sexual assault, stalking, family violence and hate crimes. “His blindness doesn’t affect him in any way,” said Denis Leeds, the clerk in Department H in Pasadena Superior Court, where Wojdak’s lizard-skin cowboy boots and diamond-stud earring are a familiar sight. “He’s an excellent attorney. He’s very aggressive. He’s very passionate about his cases.” And while some might see his blindness as a major obstacle, Wojdak, 49, said he thinks it gives him an advantage. last_img
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Intruder wielding hammer attacks two in Ladera Heights

first_imgTwo people were attacked in a Ladera Heights home today by an intruder who hit them on the head with a hammer, authorities said. Call all in black, the male intruder entered the home on 5008 Shenandoah Ave., near Pendleton Court, at 1:32 a.m., said Sgt. Dondra Cullins of the Los Angeles Sheriff Department’s Marina del Rey Station. Two victims, a male and female, were hit on the head with a hammer, Cullins said. No information about the victims’ conditions was immediately available. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREStriving toward a more perfect me: Doug McIntyre The assailant, who was wearing a black hooded sweatshirt, fled the scene, Cullins said. A hammer that may have been used in the attacks was found in the driveway of a home nearby, according to an On Scene camera crew. “At this point it is unclear whether this was a home invasion but an investigation is under way,” Cullins said. For news and observations about crime in Los Angeles and the San Fernando Valley, check out the Daily News’ crime blog by clicking here.last_img read more

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REGULATOR WANTS MORE CASH FOR BANKERS!

first_imgFinancial regulator Matthew Elderfield has called for the bank pay cap to be reviewed so that Irish banks can hire in “fresh blood”.Speaking to the MacGill Summer School in Donegal, the Central Bank head of regulation said the banking pay cap could be keeping talented bankers from considering positions in Ireland. He said this fresh talent could reinvigorate the banking system.AIB has been searching for a chief executive officer for months but has yet to appoint anybody. The bank has claimed it is difficult to find the perfect candidate because of the €500k pay cap. Elderfield said that EU processes allowed for less restrictive pay policy by banks.“Irish taxpayers are probably going to own all the banks and in order to refresh and bring in some fresh talent I think it is going to be important to bring in some outsiders to the management.“If we own the banks we want to get our best value out of them. Not having any barriers to that is going to be important, so looking at the remuneration structures for the banks is going to be important.”The regulator refused to be drawn on what he believed the pay cap should be. REGULATOR WANTS MORE CASH FOR BANKERS! was last modified: July 26th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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DONE DEAL! West Ham agree terms with Spanish youngster

first_imgWest Ham have agreed the signing of teenage striker Antonio Martinez from Valencia.The 18-year-old, a Spain Under-17 international, will officially join the Hammers on a three-year contract on July 1 but is already training with his future team-mates.Martinez, a prolific goalscorer for Valencia’s youth team, will initially link up with West Ham’s development squad but hopes to break into the first team and run out at the Olympic Stadium next season.He told the club website: “For me, it’s a great opportunity to be here and I hope to make the most of being at such a big club.“I joined West Ham because of the progress that the club is making. The decision to come here was made because it is a brilliant opportunity to join an interesting club in the Premier League.“The prospect of playing in front of 60,000 people next year really catches my attention, and it is a stadium that has so much history.“I am hoping to be able to get the opportunity to do that and I hope that it will be soon.” Antonio Martinez is already training with his new team-mates 1last_img read more

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MUM CAUGHT 3 TIMES DRIVING WITHOUT LICENCE OR INSURANCE

first_imgA JUDGE has ordered a probation report on a single mum caught driving without insurance or a licence on three different occasions.Thirty-year-old Dagmara Korytkowska, from Lawnsdale, Ballybofey, was stopped three times in five months, Letterkenny District Court heard.Her solicitor Fiona Brown said Korytkowska didn’t realised she had already been banned from driving from an earlier offence. The mother of three was detected driving without a licence or insurance in November 2012 and again in both March and April 2013.On the last two occasions the cars she was driving didn’t have an NCT certificate and the vehicles were seized.On all of the detections she had promised to produce documentation at Ballybofey Garda Station but had failed to turn up to do so.Solicitor Ms Brown said that her client believed she was covered by insurance because she was a named driver on a friend’s policy.She is a single mother and was taking her children to school.But Judge Kelly said: “If she thought she was insured she would have gone to the Garda station which leads me to believe she knew she wasn’t insured.“Her car was actually seized on two of these occasions.”He asked for a probation report and adjourned sentencing until February 17.MUM CAUGHT 3 TIMES DRIVING WITHOUT LICENCE OR INSURANCE was last modified: December 20th, 2013 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:BallybofeyDagmara KorytkowskadonegalLetterkenny Courtlast_img read more

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Mothers recall son who died, son who lived

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2Among those Sgt. Smith’s actions saved: Dan Richardson, who has recently married and himself been promoted to sergeant. That knowledge is both a blessing and a burden, for one mother to know that any milestone she will celebrate with her son – a birthday, a holiday, the birth of a child – was made possible by another mother’s loss. Fated to fight Janice Pvirre believes her son’s fate was determined when he was 5. One day, someone at school asked Paul what he wanted to do when he grew up. “I’m going to go in the Army,” the green-eyed boy declared, looking up through long lashes. “And I’m gonna have babies, and I’m gonna get married.” HOLIDAY, Fla. – Rita Richardson smiles at the memory: Her young son Dan, prowling the woods dressed in camouflage and green face paint or jumping off the shed like a paratrooper. But she wanted her little commando to know that war was more than a game. So each Memorial Day, she would take him to Arlington National Cemetery, near their Virginia home, to walk with her through that “garden of stone,” to appreciate the sacrifices honored there. This Memorial Day, she will be there in spirit as her soldier son trains for another overseas deployment. Janice Pvirre will be at Arlington in person. She will join the other “Gold Star Mothers,” those who have lost children in combat, to lay a wreath and to say a prayer at a white marker engraved with the emblem of this nation’s highest military honor. Her son, Sgt. 1st Class Paul R. Smith, died in a dusty courtyard outside Baghdad, fatally wounded in a furious firefight while showing “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity … above and beyond the call of duty” – a sacrifice that made him the only service member awarded the Medal of Honor in the Iraq war. “I said, `Well, Paul. Let’s rearrange that,”‘ his mother laughingly recalled recently by the pool at her daughter-in-law’s home in Holiday, north of Tampa. He did join the Army, in 1989, but at first he wasn’t much of a soldier. Stationed in Germany, Smith drank too much and, on a couple of occasions, slept right through formation. The first Gulf War changed him, his mother says. The man who once partied late into the night had become obsessed with training and discipline. He drilled his soldiers well into the night and was even known to swab the muzzles of their rifles, looking for dirt. Smith, who had married shortly after that war in 1992 and had become a stepfather, then a father, told his wife that he feared he hadn’t seen the last of Iraq. “He said, `We are not done. We’re going back. We didn’t finish,”‘ the young widow says. “It was just a matter of time.” That time came in March 2003. And Smith was ready. “There are two ways to come home, stepping off the plane and being carried off the plane,” he wrote in a letter to his parents. “It doesn’t matter how I come home because I am prepared to give all that I am to ensure that all my boys make it home.” One of those “boys” was Dan Richardson. Growing up around Washington, D.C., Dan Richardson was surrounded by the military. Jerry and Rita Richardson were both federal employees. Jerry Richardson had served four years as a Navy parachute rigger, and the couple always stressed service to country. When Dan was about 12, his mother took him to a gathering of World War II veterans, where, as a National Archives official, she’d been asked to give a speech on that war’s most decorated hero – Audie Murphy. She had regaled her son with tales of the young soldier who climbed onto a burning tank and, firing its .50-caliber machine gun until he ran out of ammunition, killed or wounded more than 50 attacking Germans. His deeds earned Murphy the Medal of Honor in 1945 and inspired the movie “To Hell and Back,” in which he starred as himself. Young Dan helped gather signatures on a petition for a postage stamp honoring Murphy. Like Smith, Dan was an indifferent student. He liked fast cars and skydiving – “a thrill seeker from day one,” his mother says. When he was 17 , Dan asked his parents for permission to join the Army. They happily signed his papers. Dan wanted Airborne, but ended up at Fort Stewart, Ga., with B Co. of the 11th Engineer Battalion, part of the 3rd Infantry Division. Audie Murphy’s division. And now, Paul Smith’s division. Heroic tale Like Audie Murphy On April 4, 2003, early in the war, Smith and his combat engineers were part of a 100-member force tasked with constructing a roadblock on the highway to Baghdad and to protect the eastern flank of the Saddam International Airport. PFC Richardson, all of 18, carried his platoon’s SAW – squad automatic weapon. Smith’s troops were erecting a pen to hold some Iraqi prisoners when someone spotted an enemy force of about 100 – armed with AK-47s, rocket-propelled grenades and 60mm mortars. Smith organized a hasty defense of two platoons, a Bradley Fighting Vehicle and three armored personnel carriers, according to official reports. While shouting orders, Smith went to work himself. He lobbed grenades and fired on the Iraqis with his rifle and a bazooka to cover the evacuation of three wounded soldiers from a crippled troop carrier. The Iraqis controlled a tower overlooking the compound. Smith knew he had to silence it. “Under withering fire,” Smith raced across the courtyard and climbed onto one of the disabled carriers, which was armed with a .50-caliber machine gun. Smith tried to back the vehicle into the courtyard, but the attached trailer kept jackknifing. Richardson and another soldier rushed out to unhitch it. “Bullets were flying everywhere, pinging off the ground and walls,” he wrote to his parents after the battle. Meanwhile, Smith climbed into the gun turret. With his upper body exposed, Smith blasted the tower with .50-caliber machine gun fire. Smith had emptied three 100-round cans of ammunition when the gun suddenly went silent. Richardson and the others were just unhitching the trailer when he heard someone yell, “Sgt. Smith is hit!” A bullet had pierced Smith’s skull. The ceramic breast plate in his flak jacket was shattered. Littering the ground were the bodies of more than four dozen Iraqis. One soldier later said the sight of Smith atop that troop carrier reminded him of “To Hell and Back.” Paul Smith was the only U.S. casualty in the courtyard. He was 33 years old.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img
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