Broadening your horizons

first_imgRelated posts:No related photos. Broadening your horizonsOn 4 Jun 2002 in Auto-enrolment, Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Executive MBAs offer the chance to study part-time for an invaluable degreewhile experiencing different countries and cultures. Leah Larkin spoke to EMBAgrads around the world – and found universal approvalDemuri Kasradze, 34, a surgeon from Tbilisi, Georgia, could not support hisfamily on a physician’s salary in his native country. He switched to business,started his own company and is now working towards a Cross Continent MBA atDuke University’s Fuqua School of Business, North Carolina. Lisa De Boer, 32, holds a doctor of pharmacy degree. She, too, wanted out ofthe clinical environment. De Boer, from Madison, Connecticut, started her ownconsulting company and now pursues a Duke Cross Continent MBA (tuition$74,000), taking courses both in Germany and the US – while running her companyat the same time. “I think it’s worth it,” says De Boer. “My husband [aphysician] has an MBA and no longer practices medicine. He thinks his MBA ismuch more valuable than his MD.” There is no mass exodus from hospitals and laboratories to boardrooms, butnow, more than ever, an MBA is seen as a ticket to success. After several yearson the job, more workers are heading back to school in pursuit of the coveteddegree – most on a part-time basis. These days most part-time programmes areknown as the executive MBA (EMBA). They are geared toward more experiencedpeople who are working full time. The Executive MBA Council, a non-profit association of universities andcolleges, states that 185 schools worldwide, which are members of theorganisation, offer 212 different EMBA programmes. The council estimates thatbetween 75 and 100 students are enrolled in each programme. “Even during the economic slowdown, schools are doing well. Studentsare using this time to beef up their knowledge. Enrolments are up,” saysWilliam Cox, director of Cox Communications Consultants and author of severalbooks on MBA education. Many schools, including Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business, nowstress a ‘global’ aspect to their programmes to enhance their reputation. Theyadd international courses to their curriculum, recruit more students fromabroad and offer short trips or residential stints in other countries. Coursesare usually taught in English, although there are some bilingual programmes,such as the International Executive MBA. This one-year programme, whichcombines distance learning with residential periods in Madrid and Miami, isoffered by Madrid’s Instituto de Empresa. Degree price tags can be high. Duke charges $95,500 for its Global ExecutiveMBA, a 19-month programme comprising five two-week sessions of residentialstudy, two in the US and one each in Europe, Asia and South America. In betweeneach residential programme is a10-week period of virtual class work via computer-mediatedlearning. Duke’s $74,000 Cross Continent MBA is a 20-month part-time programmecombining residential classes in Frankfurt, Germany, and the home campus inDurham, North Carolina, interspersed with learning via CD-Rom and the internet.Like many new programmes at other institutions, both programmes rely heavily ontechnology for distance learning. Such programmes incur substantial start-upcosts because they are entirely new on the market, said Eric Weber in a recentFinancial Times article. Weber is director of MBA programmes at IESE BusinessSchool at the University of Navarra in Barcelona, which offers a global EMBA at68,000 euros ($60,000). He also points out that EMBA class sizes are generallymuch smaller than those of regular MBA programmes, yet another factor drivingup the cost of an EMBA. Most of those enrolled in these costly programmes deny that making moremoney is their primary motive. Yet a salary increase has to be a strongincentive. The Financial Times reported last October that the average salaryincrease over five years for those graduating with an EMBA in 1998 was 76 percent. After three years, the average salary of an EMBA graduate from the LondonBusiness School was $144,000. The newspaper found that EMBA graduates fromEuropean schools led the way in salary increases, dispelling the myth that theMBA is not as highly rated in Europe as in the US. Scott Murphy, 29, an engineering manager with an oil and gas contractor inHouston, is paying 80 per cent of his Duke Cross Continent MBA tuition himself.”I think it will pay for itself, hopefully many times over,” hesays of the degree. He hopes to move up within his company “and at leastmarket myself to other industries if I decide to”. Gaston Aussems, 30, a senior consultant with PWC Consulting in Amsterdam,has seen a 50 per cent salary increase since he earned his MBA degree from theRotterdam School of Management in December 2000. He originally worked in IT,but has since moved into management. “I wanted to expand my horizons inmanagerial and business aspects and improve my career options. You can getstuck in a technical field,” he says. Now he is more aware of business andeconomic trends. “I can create value for my company and clients,” hesays. “This will be a ticket for me to become a senior executive,” saysScott Lane, a Duke student, during a week of study in Frankfurt. The accountingmanager from Minneapolis willingly admits he’s after both money and status. Hewas looking forward to an interview for a position as a financial director withhis company when he returned from the week-long study period in Germany.”If I were not in this programme, they would not interview me,” hesays “Without this programme, I’d have to wait years. That’s the value.”Marcus Bernhardt, 41, a general manager and regional director for RadissonSAS Hotels & Resorts, earned an EMBA at his own expense at the GraduateSchool of Business Administration Zurich in 1992 while working for a hotelcompany in Arosa, Switzerland. Back then, MBAs were not common in the hotelindustry, he says. “I wanted to increase my personal value and dosomething no-one else in our industry was doing. It was a good choice.”The hotel industry executive, now based in Brussels, has seen his salary jump80 per cent since 1994 when he earned his EMBA. As the EMBA increases in popularity, so does the variety of programmesavailable. “In recent years schools have had to find new modes ofdelivering the MBA,” notes Peter Calladine, educational service managerfor the Association of MBAs. Traditionally, a part-time MBA involved going toclass two evenings per week. Then schools began to offer classes one full dayper week. For more variety, they offered Friday evening and all-day Saturdayprogrammes. Thanks to the internet, the trend, as pioneered by Duke, has nowmoved to periods of residential study followed by weeks of home study, oftenonline. As Calladine says: “Schools must match the requirements of theindividual to fit their working life.” Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business earned top recognition for itsMBA programmes in the early 1990s. Felix Mueller, the school’s director ofmarketing, said Duke wanted to be certain it remained at the top, and decidedthis could best be achieved by combining globalisation and technology. In 1996the school, which already had a weekend EMBA programme, launched its GlobalExecutive MBA “for executives with an average 14 years experience andglobal responsibilities”. The hefty $95,500 tuition fee covers books, classmaterials including a laptop computer and software for distance learning, pluslodging and meals at the residential sites. Travel to and from the variouslocations is not included. In August 2000, Duke started its Cross Continent MBA on two continents. Eachof the eight 10-week academic terms begins with a week at one of the two campuslocations, either North Carolina or Germany. Currently, 151 students from 26countries with an average of 6.2 years of working experience are participatingin this programme. The $74,000 price tag includes all instructional materials,accommodation and meals at the campus locations, and a laptop. While Duke’s programmes are among the priciest, students – even thoseabsorbing the costs themselves – are willing to pay huge amounts for a school’sranking and prestige. “I wanted a degree from the top 10,” says DukeCross Continent MBA student Scott Lane, who is paying 50 per cent of histuition himself. He could have gone to the University of Minnesota, “butpeople go there to earn what I already earn”. Peter Calladine of the Association of MBAs is no fan of the kind of rankingsLane describes. “There is no such thing as the best school per se,”he says, “especially for part-time programmes.” What’s important isthe programme best suited to an individual’s needs, he explains. Some schools, such as the UK’s Manchester Business School, offer flexibleprogrammes. Manchester’s EMBA can be completed in as little as two-and-a-halfyears, or as long as five years, with students typically spending about sixhours a week at the school. IMD Lausanne offers 17.5 weeks of classroomsessions and “discovery expeditions” in Europe, Silicon Valley andShanghai, reinforced by 45 weeks of distance learning. The programme can becompleted in two to four years. Some, however, do not consider the Manchesterand IMD programmes true EMBAs as students do not start and finish together as agroup. The Rotterdam School of Management offers a weekend part-time Executive MBAprogramme with classes held on alternate weekends. Warwick Business School’sEMBA can be earned by attending evening classes, by modular study, or by a ‘mixand match’ of both. In their effort to go global, schools are joining forces with partnerschools in other parts of the world. The London Business School and ColumbiaBusiness School offer a joint EMBA programme under one name, the EMBA-Global($102,500). Theseus Institute in Sophia Antipolis, France, this year launchedits two-year EMBA (31,450 euros, $28,000) in partnership with The AndersonSchool at UCLA, with specialisation in managing in a high-tech environment. TheGerman International Graduate School of Management and Administration (GISMA)in Hanover, in conjunction with the US’s Purdue University, has a 22-month EMBAprogramme, costing 30,600 euros ($27,000). “It’s attractive to have study periods in various parts of theworld,” says Nunzio Quacquarelli, editor of magazine MBA Career Guide, andmanaging director of TopCareers.net. “This ensures participants will meet seniormanagers from different cultures. This is a very important part of the learningexperience of an executive MBA.” Duke student Thomas Kindler, head ofnetwork operations for Deutsche Bîrse Systems, agrees. He was motivated topursue an EMBA “to build up an international network”, in addition toshifting his focus from technology to business, he says. The One MBA is a new part-time programme to launch in September. It is thebrainchild of five business schools: the Chinese University of Hong Kong; Fundac‹oGetulio Vargas (S‹o Paulo); the Monterrey Tech Graduate School of BusinessAdministration and Leadership (Mexico); the Rotterdam School of Management; andthe University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Executives enroled in this21-month programme study at their home business school for two-thirds of theprogramme and spend the remaining third of the programme together inresidential modules in Asia, Europe, North and South America. The cost is46,500 euros ($41,000). Yet another new programme is the Trium EMBA, allying the New York UniversityStern School of Business, the London School of Economics and Political Science,and HEC Paris, Graduate Business School. The 16-month programme involvesresidential sessions at these three locations, plus Hong Kong and Brazil, andcosts $87,500. No matter where they are located, all EMBA programmes seem to have onelearning aspect in common: team projects with fellow students. Participantsgive high marks to this type of study, which they consider an added bonus toearning an EMBA as opposed to a regular full-time MBA. Marcus Bernhardt, who earned his EMBA in Zurich, stresses the value of‘active and practical oriented discussions’ with fellow students who hadexperience in the business world. Same for Duke student Scott Murphy, whoespecially likes the fact that his fellow students all have work experience.”You can learn just as much from the students as from theprofessors,” he says. “This would not happen in a regular MBAprogramme.” Michel Arres also liked working with fellow students. This Rotterdam gradsays his programme involved a lot of group activities. “You’d learn to seethe other side of things. Group interaction is very important. Sometimes wewould get together during the week to work on projects. Sometimes we’d meet indifferent places – Dusseldorf, Utrecht. We picked the most central place. Itwas really fun.” The 34-year-old, formerly in sales, is now a member of the Europe, MiddleEast and Africa team working on strategy for American Power Conversion inRotterdam. In his present job, as in sales, he works with customers, he says,but now on a higher level. “An MBA helps you understand the problems thecustomers are facing. I can talk their language.” As technology plays a greater role in today’s EMBA programmes, virtualteamwork becomes part of the learning process. “You learn what’s it’s liketo interact with your counterparts when they’re not around. This will be big inbusiness in the future,” Duke student Eric Altshuler points out. Holding down a demanding full-time job and following the rigorousrequirements of an EMBA programme is no easy feat. Many executives in theseprogrammes spend far more than 40 hours a week on their jobs. “It is verydifficult to balance family, friends and work,” says student Lisa De Boer,at Duke in Frankfurt. In addition to time on the job, she needs 20 hours perweek for school work. Gaston Aussems echoes her comments: “If you are willing and able to paythe price, in many respects the EMBA is a must,” says the seniorconsultant. “On a corporate and social level it gave me more than Iexpected. An EMBA is demanding, but a great investment. Your input is returnedten-fold.” The typical EMBA studentAge: 37Sex: 75 per cent male, 25 per cent femaleYears on the job: 15 Years of management experience: 10Average salary at time of     beginningprogramme: $85,000Source: The Executive MBA CouncilCompanies seek to gain knowledgeWhile companies such as the Germanpharmaceutical and chemical giant Merck and Deutsche Bank absorb most, if notall, costs for key employees seeking an MBA, they want their employees to studypart-time and stay on the job. As Deutsche Bank’s Michael Maffucci, director ofglobal leadership development, points out, Deutsche Bank wants the knowledgegained by those seeking an MBA transferred back to the institution. “Oneof our main thrusts is that we get a transfer of knowledge and skills,” hesays. Merck likes the fact that the part-time MBA candidates itsponsors at Ashridge Management College near London often have studyassignments that are directly related to their jobs. “The link tocorporate business is a big advantage,” says Andreas Janz, Merck’s head ofinternational management development programmes. “Assignments can give adirect contribution to the company. It helps that students apply their learningto Merck.” The company found that many of its employees with scientificbackgrounds were moving into management positions without a businessbackground. “We like to prepare them, to help them acquire the knowledgeto fill these positions,” says Janz.Companies that sponsor employees in an MBA programme usuallyhave an agreement that the employees stay with the company during the period ofa study and for a specified time afterwards. The Financial Times 2001 Survey ofa sample of students who earned part-time MBAs in 1998 found that 43 per centwere still working for the same company that employed them five years afterthey began their studies. According to a Business Week 2001 survey of those whoearned MBAs with company support, more than half were dissatisfied with careerdevelopment at their sponsoring companies.Janz acknowledged that ‘a few’ of Merck’s MBA employees haveleft and that retention can be a problem. “This is a challenge.High-quality people are harder to retain. They’re attractive to othercompanies,” he says.Not all part-time MBA seekers have company backing. Some pickup the tab themselves. They want to combine work and study and keep their jobs,often because they cannot afford to quit work and study full time. “It wasnot financially feasible for me to stop working and go to school full time. I’dacquire an enormous debt,” says Gaston Aussems, who earned a part-time MBAfrom the Rotterdam School of Management.Jane Fiona Cumming, director of Article 13, a London-basedorganisation that helps businesses and other institutions implement new ways ofdoing business, finds one of the key advantages of earning an MBA while stillworking is that academic projects can often benefit both the company and thestudent. “An MBA is no use if you can’t translate it into practice,”says Cumming, who earned an MBA as a part-time student at the CharteredInstitute of Marketing in Henley, UK. “I was able to ask my clients, ‘Doyou want a free consultancy?’ and base my projects around them.”last_img read more

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Commentary: Flynn And The Force Trump Can’t Resist

first_imgDecember 2, 2017    Posted by: jlkrull59By John KrullTheStatehouseFile.com INDIANAPOLIS – This is how a dam crumbles.A crack widens to a hole, which then becomes a break and then the accumulating pressure brings the whole thing down.John Krull, publisher, TheStatehouseFile.comThis seems to be what’s happening within President Donald Trump’s White House now.The steady, unrelenting pressure brought by Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation of the ties of the Trump campaign and administration ties with Russia already has produced several cracks – the Paul Manafort indictment, the George Papadopoulos plea bargain – in the president’s stonewall.But the negotiated guilty plea of lying to the FBI by former National Security Adviser Michael Flynn means at least one crack has widened into a hole and maybe even a break.Flynn was in serious trouble. Mueller had many avenues to prosecute Flynn, several of which could have led to serious prison time for both Flynn and his family. The plea bargain on the smallest of the charges facing Flynn in exchange for cooperating with the special counsel means Flynn likely won’t spend any time behind bars and his family will be left alone.The only way Flynn could have wiggled out from under that weight was by trading something – something big.About the only thing he had to offer that Mueller might want is the president himself.Perhaps this explains the president’s erratic behavior since word first broke that Flynn’s defense team had stopped cooperating with the White House’s lawyers.Trump’s attorneys have done their best to minimize the impact of that development. After months of praising and defending Flynn, they have pivoted and said the guilty plea for lying demonstrates he can’t be trusted – an obvious attempt to try to discredit damaging testimony from the man before he even delivers it.That is what lawyers are supposed to do. They’re supposed to protect their client.What they cannot do is protect Trump from himself.The news that Flynn had flipped seemed to unhinge the president.Since it first broke, he’s waded, unnecessarily, into the quagmire enveloping former NBC “Today” host Matt Lauer’s alleged sexual misconduct – and thus renewed calls that the accusations Trump has harassed and assaulted women be investigated. He’s suggested that the infamous “Access Hollywood” tape isn’t real – even though he acknowledged it and apologized for it just a year ago. And he has tried to raise again the thoroughly discredited claim that former President Barack Obama isn’t an American citizen.If all that weren’t enough, he also has gone out of his way to undercut and embarrass his secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, while the United States attempts to deal with a potential nuclear threat in North Korea.The president’s actions are those of a man who is unbalanced.Or desperate.This president’s pattern when he is under assault or stress is unvarying. He tries to find a way to go on the counter-attack, either by demeaning or discrediting his opponents or critics. If he can’t do that, Trump creates one diversion or conjures up one smoke screen after another to distract people from what’s going on.He does this because it is the only way he knows to meet a challenge.But it isn’t likely to work in this situation.Robert Mueller is everything Donald Trump is not – disciplined rather than impulsive, self-contained instead of needy, and determined rather than self-pitying.Some months ago, I talked with Peter Rusthoven, former associate counsel to President Ronald Reagan, a onetime Republican U.S. Senate candidate and a veteran of some savage Washington wars.Rusthoven said the intelligence and the investigatory communities in the federal government were the two forces that savvy political figures never wanted to alienate – and that Trump had angered them both. Rusthoven predicted the president would learn this lesson to his regret, because both communities moved like powerful rivers, always forward, with a drive that just never lets up.That’s another way of saying that the dam protecting the president is under immense pressure and about to crumble.That’s when Donald Trump’s real education will begin.John Krull is director of Franklin College’s Pulliam School of Journalism, host of “No Limits” WFYI 90.1 Indianapolis and publisher of TheStatehouseFile.com, a news website powered by Franklin College journalism students.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Rage Against The Machine, Cypress Hill & Public Enemy Members Announce Major Tour

first_imgThere’s been quite a lot of hype surrounding Prophets Of Rage, the new supergroup featuring members of Rage Against The Machine, Cypress Hill and Public Enemy, and for good reason too. The band has made a considerable splash at their first three performances, including two in Los Angeles and one in Brooklyn, NY as a makeup for a rained out, last minute Governors Ball set.Today, the group has announced a major tour schedule with 35+ dates, stretching from August through October and stopping at arenas all across the country. The first date on their schedule is an interesting one, July 19th in Cleveland, OH, where they’ll be on hand to protest the Republican National Convention. One month later, the band will hit venues nationwide, including stops in Brooklyn, Red Rocks and more.Check out the full schedule below. Tickets go on sale this Friday, June 10th, and can be found here.July 19Cleveland, OhioTBDAug 19Fairfax, VAEagleBank ArenaAug 20Camden, NJBB&T PavilionAug 21Mansfield, MAXfinity CenterAug 23Harford, CTThe Xfinity TheatreAug 24Toronto, ONMolson Canadian AmpitheatreAug 26Holmdel, NJPNC Bank Arts CenterAug 27Brooklyn, NYBarclays CenterAug 28Wantagh, NYNikon at Jones Beach TheaterAug 30Noblesville, INKlipsch Music CenterAug 31Burgettstown, PAFirst Niagara PavilionSep 01Clarkston, MIDTE Energy Music TheatreSep 03Tinley Park, ILHollywood Casino AmphitheatreSep 04St. Louis, MOHollywood Casino AmphitheatreSep 05Kansas City, MOProvidence Medical Center AmphitheatreSep 07Morrison, CORed Rocks AmphitheatreSep 10Auburn, WAWhite River AmphitheatreSep 11Ridgefield, WASunlight Supply AmphitheatreSep 13Mountain View, CAShoreline AmphitheatreSep 15Los Angeles, CAThe ForumSep 17Phoenix, AZAk-Chin PavilionSep 25Dallas, TXGexa Energy PavilionSep 27Nashville, TNBridgestone ArenaSep 29Virginia Beach, VAVeterans United Home Loans AmphitheaterOct 01Tampa, FLMidFlorida Credit Union AmphitheatreOct 02West Palm Beach, FLPerfect Vodka AmphitheaterOct 04Atlanta, GAVerizon Wireless AmphitheaterOct 05Cincinnati, OHRiverbend Music CenterOct 07Tulsa, OKBOK CenterOct 08Houston, TXCynthia Woods Mitchell PavilionOct 09San Antonio, TXAT&T CenterOct 11El Paso, TXEl Paso County ColiseumOct 12Albuquerque, NMIsleta AmphitheatreOct 14Las Vegas, NVMandalay Bay Event CenterOct 16Chula Vista, CASleep Train Amphitheatrelast_img read more

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Space Kadet Shares New Single “Deep Cheeze” [Premiere]

first_imgKeep up with Space Kadet on their Facebook page, and be sure to catch the band on tour throughout the year. Dates can be seen below.Space Kadet Tour DatesMarch 17th and 18th @ Shamrockers Funk Ball Tampa, FL w/ Andrellien, Yheti, Zebbler and moreMarch 31st @ Martin’s Jackson, MSApril 23rd @ Aisle 5 Atlanta, GA (Jubee and Friends super jam w/ members of Higher Learning and more)June 2nd @ Tapp Room Boone, NCJune 3rd @ Aisle 5 Atlanta, GA supporting The Russ Liquid TestMany more dates to be announced!Cover photo by Ervin Elzie.Artwork by Josh Hamby. Atlanta based jamtronica band Space Kadet continues to explore many genres on the instrumental spectrum, strongly emphasizing the creation of a spacy funky vibe. The culmination of musician friends Rohan Prakash (drums and samples), Alex Etheridge (Bass and Synths), Kyle Gissendaner (Guitar/samples) and Phil Ordonez (Percussion), their sound caters to any variety of music lovers ranging from down tempo abstract dubs, drum and bass, deep dub, electro jazz, high energy funk and more.The future is bright for Space Kadet, recently sharing the stage with praised acts like Zoogma, Sunsquabi, The Werks, Elliot Lipp, Mr. Bill, Govinda, Late Night Radio, Higher Learning, Modern Measure, Stratosphere All Stars, and appearing on festivals like Purple Hatters Ball and Zen Awakening.Today, the band shares their newest release, a single titled “Deep Cheeze.” Alex Etheridge tells us how the song came to fruition. “Our guitarist Kyle and I were playing around with recording different vocal stems. Initially we weren’t taking it too seriously, but over time, the more we picked at it, the more and it started to reflect all of us collectively. There was a tipping point once Rohan had a look at it when we all finally had that ‘a-ha’ moment and knew somebody needed to hear this. Shortly after, Rohan added some touch ups on drums and percussion which resulted in the final product we have now.”Rohan Prakash adds, “We have a a few tracks that we’ve been getting ready to release far before this track was written, as well as different styles and genres we have been playing with, but the longer “Deep Cheeze” sat on our speakers, the more energy we had towards trying to get it out. This is the first of many releases to come as well as a new EP coming soon.”We’re excited to premiere this new single! Listen to Space Kadet’s “Deep Cheeze,” streaming below.last_img read more

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Film Study Center offers fellowships

first_imgThe Film Study Center (FSC) at Harvard University offers fellowships for the production of original film, video, photographic, and phonographic projects, from the ethnographic to the experimental, which interpret the world through image and sound. FSC-Harvard fellowships are open to Harvard faculty, graduate students, teaching assistants, and postdoctoral and research fellows. Applicants must be affiliated with Harvard during the fellowship year for which they are applying.Fellows are part of a community of makers, and participate in monthly gatherings where works in progress are shared and discussed. Fellowships include access to cameras and other production equipment, postproduction facilities, and technical support, as well as some funding.The deadline is Feb. 15.last_img

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A gathering to battle cancer

first_img Physician-researcher welcomes shift in screening guidelines, notes recent findings on diet and disease recurrence Amid alarming projections that global cancer rates will skyrocket, researchers from around the country gathered at Harvard on Monday to share their latest findings and to launch a center whose aim is to boost early detection and prevention.By 2040, deaths due to cancer are expected to rise 60 percent in the U.S., 79 percent in China, and 106 percent in sub-Saharan Africa, according to Timothy Rebbeck, Vincent L. Gregory Jr. Professor of Cancer Prevention at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and director of the School’s new Zhu Family Center for Global Cancer Prevention. The center was launched Monday on World Cancer Day.“I think that we have the very clear picture that … while we have many interventions and treatments and ways of approaching cancer, we’re still not anywhere near dealing with the coming onslaught of the cancer burden,” Rebbeck said.In the last century, Rebbeck pointed out, medical science has made inroads against several of humanity’s top killers, including infectious disease and heart disease, but cancer has proven stubborn.A look at the top 10 killer cancers shows that, while the disease is a burden around the world, the mix of cancers varies by region. In the U.S. and China, for example, lung cancer is the top killer, while in sub-Saharan Africa it is cervical cancer, a sign that the latest treatments are slow to be distributed there. An effective vaccine against the human papilloma virus — one of the top causes of cervical cancer — has been available for more than a decade.In addition, Rebbeck said, although smoking rates are falling in many places, that’s not the case in Africa and the eastern Mediterranean, where the rates are rising. As a result, rates of smoking-related cancers are expected to rise there as well.Rebbeck made his comments at the new center’s inaugural symposium, “Reinventing Cancer Prevention and Early Detection for the 21st Century,” held in Harvard Medical School’s New Research Building. The all-day gathering featured experts from around the country discussing the latest findings in their work to prevent cancer and detect cancers earlier.Harvard Chan School Dean Michelle Williams said the center’s aim fits well with public health’s broad philosophy that “it’s far better to prevent illness than treat it.”When it comes to most types of cancer, Williams said effective prevention seems a distant goal, but she hopes for a time when cancer is seen like smallpox is today — a once-dreaded disease fading from view.“Imagine some day in the future, it might be possible that we no longer need symposia like this, or that we would need a World Cancer Day to draw attention to the devastation of this disease,” Williams said. “Perhaps because of the scientific advances sparked by the work of this interdisciplinary center … future generations will look upon cancer as a disease of the past.”The center, Rebbeck said, will encourage innovations in methods, technology, and tools to combat cancer. It will encourage multidisciplinary teams to bring broad perspectives to bear, and will make health equity and global dissemination of innovations a goal. It will offer a new grant program for researchers doing innovative work at Harvard and a second grant to African scientists conducting “catalytic research” on that continent. The center will support cancer prevention education and training, and create two endowed chairs in cancer prevention and early detection, one for a full professor and a second for an assistant or associate professor.,During the discussion, Sanjiv Gambhir, chair of Stanford Medical School’s Radiology Department, said early detection is the key to cancer survival, yet most of the health care industry’s efforts are directed at later stages of the disease.For example, the five-year survival rate for lung cancer that has spread throughout the body is just 3.5 percent, while the rate for the same cancer if detected when still localized rises to 52.9 percent. Despite that dramatic difference in survivability, just 15 percent of lung cancers are caught early. That low early detection rate is replicated for other cancers. That results in more cancer deaths, and also 100 to 1,000 times more money being spent on treatment for patients in late stages, as opposed to early stages.“We have this huge opportunity to start to now think about how we shift to catching these cancers early,” Gambhir said.Gambhir described a suite of technologies in development that aim to catch cancer early, and he drew a picture of a future when homes, cars, and electronic devices regularly monitor health and pick up cancer-related changes in their early stages.He used as an analogy the intensive monitoring of jet engines, which once were checked just every six months. Routine checks were first increased in frequency, and then sensors were integrated into the engines to provide constant monitoring. Today, he said, jet engines have 100 sensors that check their status every 30 seconds. The sensors send data back to technicians, who evaluate the readings and decide whether and what intervention is needed. In addition, Gambhir said, each engine has a virtual twin on a computer that can be used to predict how changing conditions will affect performance in the future.Something similar may one day be possible for humans, Gambhir said. Inexpensive sensors are being developed that can be deployed in the body to provide early warning of cancer.Early detection efforts are using biomarkers, molecules given off by tumors or by the body fighting cancer. But the current suite of biomarkers can be difficult to spot, particularly early on when detection is most useful. The tumors are small and the biomarkers few. 40% prevention rate for colorectal cancers Seeking a culprit behind rise in colorectal cancer among younger adults Related Aspirin found to reduce overall cancer risk To remedy that, researchers are developing synthetic markers that can be injected into the body and react in a way that is easily detectable when cancer is present. Gambhir described detection technology developed by his lab that can detect biomarkers for cancer at very low levels. The technology is used in concert with a low-dose CT scan, used to look for lung cancer in smokers, and can reliably identify the false positives that are common with the CT screen.Eventually, Gambhir said, a person’s home or car could be brought into the monitoring scheme. He described a “smart toilet” that routinely samples urine and feces to help build a personal health profile, and then monitors a person over time to detect changes that might indicate early cancer growth.Before that, he said, we need a better understanding of the earliest changes showing cancer growing in the body.“If we don’t invest in the biology, we can never solve the early detection problem,” Gambhir said. “None of these tools can work miracles unless they know what to look for.” Effect strongest against colorectal, other gastrointestinal tumors Colonoscopy screening offers detection in two regions of colorectum last_img read more

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Professor discusses nuances of autism

first_imgProfessor Michael Waddell, director of the master of autism studies program at Saint Mary’s, called for a more complete understanding of autistic identities — acknowledging both the struggles and gifts of individuals with autism — during a presentation Wednesday.In the lecture, Waddell read from his personal work exploring autism in relation to the Catholic faith and said he plans to publish a book on the subject in the future.“The task of my book is to search Catholic intellectual tradition for resources that can enrich the way we understand and respond to autism,” he said. Mary Steurer | The Observer Professor Michael Waddell speaks on autism and individuality during a presentation in Malloy Hall on Wednesday evening. The event was sponsored by the Notre Dame chapter of Minorities and Philosophy.Waddell opened his presentation by discussing autistic identity in context of the “Autism Rights” movement, which advocates for autism to be viewed not as a disability, but rather as a form of neurological diversity.Members of the movement believe that, for those on the spectrum, autism is an intrinsic part of the self, Waddell said.“Accordingly, the much-sought-after cure for autism has been condemned by some autistic self-advocates as an assault on a minority group that is akin to eugenics or genocide,” he said.Waddell said he looked to St. Thomas Aquinas and his writings on the metaphysics of identity and relationships to gain insight into how those with disabilities form their identities.He referenced a reflection on Aquinas’s writings by Fr. Terrence Ehrman, assistant director for life science research and outreach at Notre Dame, entitled “Disability and Resurrection Identity.”Waddell said Ehrman “goes so far as to explicitly deny that disabilities are intrinsic to a person’s identity” and “rejects the notion that healing a disability would destroy an individual’s identity” in his article.“Indeed in this way of seeing things, curing autism might even be thought to make a person’s life better,” Waddell added.However, he said, advocates of autistic identity would strongly object to the idea that their condition is a privation, instead seeing it as an inalienable part of themselves.Waddell said his research led him to view autistic identity as uniquely relational, defined by the way autistic individuals bond with one another.While those with autism are often misunderstood as antisocial by nature, Waddell said, in reality, they can develop profoundly meaningful relationships if given the opportunity to freely interact with others like themselves.“In this way, autistic identity is not merely a matter of being a subject of privation, or even a matter of a diagnosis — it’s an act of self-understanding that creates connections with others who become friends,” he said. “These relations that comprise autistic identity are real goods in the lives of autistic people.”With this in mind, Waddell said, public discussion of autism ought to focus on both acknowledging the struggles life with the disorder brings as well as celebrating the unique minds of those who have it.“I think that there’s room for meeting in the middle,” he said. “It allows us to have meaningful conversation in a way that’s not happening now.”Waddell added that Catholic Social Teaching can provide insight into how dialogue between non-autistic individuals — so-called “neurotypicals” — and those on the spectrum can be achieved.“Here I think the Catholic Church has even more resources to offer — teachings and practices about using power to serve those who are vulnerable, rather than to persecute them, about forgiveness and reconciliation in broken relationships, about understanding all people as having inherent identity,” he said.Tags: Autism, autism rights, Catholic Social Teachinglast_img read more

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CU2.0 Podcast – Episode 6 – Trudy Soucoup, Board Member WSECU

first_img continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr It’s the CU 2.0 podcast! CU 2.0 is excited to bring you the sixth in a series of podcasts from Robert McGarvey. Welcome to the CU 2.0 Podcast, regular interviews with credit union leaders, thinkers, movers, shakers and more.This week, Robert sat down with Trudy Soucoup, a member of the board of directors at Washington State Employees Credit Union, a top 100 institution with about $2.8 billion in assets. Trudy’s day job is as CEO of Homes First!, a nonprofit focused on low-income housing in Washington. The focus of this podcast: what’s it like to be a board member in 2018, a time of enormous flux for most credit unions.Hint: it’s a lot of work.You’ll hear about that and also a slightly embarrassing introduction to MRDC in this podcast. Board members are critical to the success of credit unions. But rarely are they heard from. So listen up.last_img read more

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Multi-million dollar sale of Gold Coast apartments settled

first_imgThe apartments at 2 Twenty Third Ave, Palm Beach, will be demolished to make way for Pacific Palm Beach. Renders of Pacific Palm Beach to be built on Twenty Third Ave.THE ink on the sale of a Palm Beach apartment block is dry, paving the way for a luxury waterfront development.The $6.685 million sale of the four-storey unit complex at 2 Twenty Third Ave settled in the past month. Renders of Pacific Palm Beach. The apartments at 2 Twenty Third Ave, Palm Beach, will be demolished to make way for Pacific Palm Beach.More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa17 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoRay White Mermaid Beach agent Troy Dowker handled the sale.“That’s a pretty rare site, that one,” Mr Dowker said.“It’s definitely one of the best beachfront sites on the Gold Coast.”It will be demolished to make way for Pacific Palm Beach, another apartment development with 13 designer half-floor residences as well as a double-storey beach house and penthouse with exclusive rooftop terrace. Renders of Pacific Palm Beach.Synergy Property Partners is developing the site while Kollosche Prestige Agents are selling the apartments.One half-floor apartment remains on the market following a successful off-the-plan sales campaign.The development is expected to be finished in July next year.last_img read more

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RWE makes it easier for Sofia OWF future supply chain

first_imgThe offshore wind farm is anticipated to be fully commissioned in 2026. The suppliers portal will display contract opportunities with the Sofia project and its key contractors as they become available. Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy, who has signed a preferred supplier agreement for the project’s wind turbines, has an active potential and confirmed UK supplier base in a number of commodity areas and there will be opportunities for these firms, and others, to tender for a range of services particularly related to port and vessel activity, according to RWE. Offshore construction at the project site some 195 kilometres off the UK’s North East coast is expected to start in 2023. “Our key aim for the online directory is to provide a platform for suppliers to create their own presence, tailored to their offshore wind ambitions, and for others throughout the offshore wind supply chain to use it to search for the goods and services they need”, Mike Nolan said. The Sofia offshore wind farm will comprise 100 Siemens Gamesa 14 MW turbines, and will therefore become the first European project to install the model that will be market-ready by 2024. “We encourage all suppliers with an interest in working with the project to register their details online, and we will work closely with our Tier 1 suppliers to make sure they also fully engage with the features of the portal”, Nolan said. “We are keen to maximise the involvement of UK companies as the project progresses, particularly with onshore construction due to start in Teesside in the first quarter of 2021”, said Mike Nolan, Sofia Offshore Wind Farm’s Head of Procurement.center_img “As more suppliers come on board we will encourage their active participation in the portal to ensure it adds maximum value to the project, to our suppliers, and to potential suppliers across the supply chain”, Mike Nolan said. The portal also comprises an online open search directory, where suppliers can add their profiles. RWE has launched an online suppliers portal where companies can search for and find opportunities on the Sofia offshore wind project. The final investment decision for the 1.4 GW offshore wind farm is due to be reached in the first quarter of 2021, and the project will enter onshore construction immediately after that. With the directory, as well as the wider suppliers portal, RWE is aiming to boost UK supply chain opportunities, particularly in the North East, according to the developer. Furthermore, there will be opportunities for UK suppliers in the high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission system package, which will be delivered by GE Renewable Energy’s Grid Solutions and Sembcorp Marine. A significant element of all the primary equipment will be manufactured and fabricated from GE’s Grid Solutions’ Stafford facilities, the developer states.last_img read more

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