Budding Movement Against Coal Expansion in Japan

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享From SNL:Activists gathered outside Japan’s Embassy in the U.S. to protest against the country’s support for domestic and overseas coal projects with more protests planned in Tokyo and Jakarta. “Groups will continue to put pressure on Japan to end its fossil fuel financing in the lead up to Japan hosting the G7 summit in May,” a statement from Friends of the Earth said.From Politico:Some environmentalists, including the Sierra Club and Greenpeace, have singled out Japan and plan to protest outside the Japanese embassy in Washington today at noon, calling on Prime Minister Shinzō Abe to reject financing for a coal plant in Indonesia. The delayed 2,000-megawatt Batang coal plant project is supposed reach financial close in a week and Japan’s Bank for International Cooperation — the Japanese version of the Export-Import Bank — is expected to extend its support. Japan’s continued backing of coal projects violates the spirit of both the Paris climate agreement and an agreement among OECD countries to cut international financing for coal projects that will take effect next year, Sierra Club’s Nicole Ghio told reporters on a conference call.From Friends of the Earth:As Japanese Prime Minister Shinzō Abe visits the U.S. this week, activists rallied outside the Japanese Embassy earlier this afternoon to highlight the growing concern and international pushback against Japan’s increasingly isolated support for domestic and overseas coal projects. Protests will also take place tomorrow in Tokyo and Jakarta to demand that Japan stop financing coal projects in Japan, Indonesia, and around the world. Protesters at each event will deliver a letter with these demands signed by over 220 groups from 43 countries, including Australia, Egypt, Indonesia, Japan, Myanmar, and  South Africa. Groups will continue to put pressure on Japan to end its fossil fuel financing in the lead up to Japan hosting the G7 summit in May.Despite many countries shifting away from these unprofitable coal projects, including OECD coal finance restrictions, Japan has continued to move backward by supporting both domestic coal projects and financing some of the most controversial coal projects around the globe. One of those projects, the Batang coal-fired power plant, has been plagued by human rights abuses. Despite this, as the April 6 deadline to secure financing for the project gets closer, the Japan Bank for International Cooperation — JBIC — is once again considering financing the project.Full item: Activists protest Japan’s controversial coal financing during Prime Minister Abe’s visit Budding Movement Against Coal Expansion in Japanlast_img