Heyneke Meyer picks a South Africa squad full of surprises

first_img Perfect 10… but Meyer has picked Racing Métro’s Goosen as a full-back LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Springboks bulk up for tourSpringbok coach Heyneke Meyer sprung several surprises when naming a cumbersome 36-man squad for their autumn tour to Ireland, Britain and Italy. The squad only included four locks but seven loose forwards and four fly-halves.One of the biggest eyebrow-raisers was the inclusion of Racing Metro fly-half Johan Goosen as a full-back in the group. Goosen, 22, admitted that he thought his Test career was over when he chose to move to Paris after an injury plagued two seasons in South Africa.The Golden Lions front row duo of tighthead Julian Redelinghuys and hooker Robbie Coetzee were also rewarded for their consistent form during the Currie Cup, but neither is likely to feature until later in the tour.Change of scenery: Senatla can usually be seen on the sevens circuitMeyer also went for the searing pace of Western Province wing Seabelo Senatla, who is a star on the HSBC World Sevens circuit and one of the quickest men in world rugby. As an 18-year-old Senatla clocked 10.6 for the 100-metres without any targeted athletic training.The tour has been broken in half with the first two Tests against Ireland and England seen as priorities both in terms of performance and results.Ireland, the current Six Nations champions, and England as 2015 Rugby World Cup hosts are obvious targets and a full strength South Africa will take the field in those encounters.Italy in Padova will allow Meyer to tinker with his lineup while the Welsh Test on 29 November falls outside the International Rugby Board’s prescribed Test window.Bryan Habana, Bakkies Botha, Gurthro Steenkamp, Schalk Burger, JP Pietersen, Goosen, Jano Vermaak (who replaced Ruan Pienaar three days into the tour) and Morné Steyn won’t be eligible for that match.French club: Habana and Botha will be back in Toulon colours by 29 NovWestern Province claim 33rd Currie Cup titleWestern Province claimed their second Currie Cup title in three seasons with a gritty 19-16 win over the Golden Lions at Newlands in October.Although the tournament has lost some of its gloss over the past two decades with the emergence of Super Rugby as the priority competition, it still holds a dear place in South African hearts. The Springboks are gearing up to face Ireland, England, Italy and Wales. Craig Ray analyses the squad, and tells us what else is going on in South African rugby… center_img Joost is still putting a smile on our faces – check out this video… With 20 contracted Springboks withdrawn from the latter stages of the tournament to enable them to prepare for the Springboks’ tour, it allowed for even more young talents to emerge.Players such as WP fullback Cheslin Kolbe, Blue Bulls centre Burger Odendaal, and the Golden Lions trio of flank Jaco Kriel, hooker Armand van der Merwe and utility back Jaco van der Walt were just some of the standout performers.Catching the eye: Kolbe has played for SA sevensThis year’s tournament saw a return to an eight-team premier division – up from six over the previous season – but from the outset WP, the Lions and the Sharks set the pace with the unfashionable Mpumalanga Pumas causing some upsets.The Pumas sat second on the standings at the halfway stage, but lost four of their five second round games to miss out on a semi-final berth. The Bulls recovered from losing four of their first five games to reach the semi-finals.Linee loses his final battleFormer Western Province and Springbok centre Tinus Linee died after complications of Motor Neuron Disease (MND) at his Paarl home on November 2.Despite his diminutive frame the 45-year-old was a renowned tackler who felled many bigger opponents through a combination of good technique, great courage and a dose of recklessness.Springbok backline coach Ricardo Loubscher, who toured Britain alongside Linee as part of the SA ‘A’ team in 1996, summed it up perfectly.Midfield maestro: Linee with de Villiers and Burger“We all knew that when you were lined up against Tinus, the No 12 channel was a no-go zone.”Linee played 112 times for WP and won three Currie Cup titles. He also played nine tour matches for the Springboks, although he never earned a Test cap.Former Springbok scrumhalf Joost van der Westhuizen is also inflicted by the incurable degenerative disease and has committed his remaining days to raising funds for research through his J9 Foundation.last_img read more

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Quel combat! The political battle that will determine the future of French rugby

first_img Psst! Don’t tell Philippe this, but… Serge Blanco whispers in Pierre Camou’s ear (Pic: AFP/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Serge Blanco and Bernard Laporte may both challenge incumbent Pierre Camou for the top job when the French federation elects a new president next year. It promises to be a clash of philosophies as much as personalities… The successor to Philippe Saint-André will be announced next month, but that decision will have only a limited bearing on the long-term fortunes of the national team. The crucial selection comes in December 2016, when the Fédération Française de Rugby (FFR) elects its new president. The incumbent, Pierre Camou, has been in the post since 2008, having been re-elected in 2012, and it’s believed he will stand for a third term despite the fact he turns 70 in August.A possible alternative is Camou’s right-hand man, Serge Blanco, one of the FFR’s eight vice-presidents and a man who is in many respects the face of French rugby. After his glorious career as a player, Blanco moved effortlessly into business and administration, opening a successful chain of clothing stores as well as a health farm, and also running the Ligue Nationale de Rugby (LNR, the French clubs’ governing body) from 1998 to 2008.He left the position to join the FFR, where he has been the driving force behind Le Grand Stade de Rugby, the FFR’s new 82,000-seat national stadium that will open in 2020 to the south of Paris.Power SergeBlanco is a divisive figure within French rugby, splitting opinion between those who see him as a brilliant and charismatic administrator and those who regard him as a Machiavellian figure.His pronouncements in February about the possibility of his standing for the presidency next year were, for many, further proof of his slipperiness. In an interview with broadcaster RTL, Blanco was asked if he had an eye for the role. “Yes, of course,” he replied. Two and a half hours later, he issued a statement to a press agency in which he said his words had been misinterpreted and that he was fully supportive of Camou.Not for nothing did Toulon owner Mourad Boudjellal liken Blanco in 2012 to “Doctor Jekyll and Mr Hyde”, a man who “has become the most eminent member of French rugby’s oligarchy”.Laporte the reformistThe ‘oligarchy’ is the FFR, seen by an increasing number of people in France as responsible for holding back the development of rugby. Head of the malcontents, unofficially, is Bernard Laporte. The former France coach is in his last full season at Toulon (he will share the reins“I feel the necessity to reform the sport,” says Toulon coach Bernard Laporte (Pic: AFP/Getty Images)with Diego Dominguez at the start of 2016 before stepping down six months later), and Laporte is being encouraged to run for the presidency by those who share his views that the FFR is in urgent need of overhaul.center_img In a lengthy interview in last week’s Midi Olympique, the 50-year-old Laporte confirmed he was thinking about standing for the presidency and that he would announce his decision at the end of this year. “I don’t have the personal ambition to become president of the Federation,” he explained. “But I feel the necessity to reform the sport.”Above all, Laporte wants to decentralise the way rugby is run in France, investing more power in the regions to make decisions instead of referring everything – such as a red card in a junior game – back to the FFR in Paris.Laporte, who served two years under the centre-right Nicolas Sarkozy as Secretary of State for Sports, believes that the notorious French bureaucracy is constraining rugby. “We must simplify things and make the life of directors and the clubs easier,” said Laporte, adding that he wanted to improve the structure of youth, amateur and women’s rugby in France.Innovation, not stagnationThe word he used on more than one occasion was ‘innovation’, and it’s true the FFR isn’t exactly overflowing with this quality. Look at the way the new France coach will be elected. A panel of seven wise man will make the ultimate decision – Camou, Blanco, Jo Maso, Jean-Claude Skrela, Didier Retière, Jean-Pierre Lux and Jean Dunyach. Only Blanco and Retière are under 65.For too long, in Laporte’s opinion, the FFR has been a cosy cartel that rarely engages with those outside its circle of trust. “Without opposition, it’s the dictatorship,” says Laporte. “ABruised Blues: France have gone backwards rapidly under Philippe Saint-André (Pic: Getty Images)federation must move, bubble (with ideas). I don’t mean that the people in place today are incompetent. I am for new ideas carried by new people.” Laporte is also for greater transparency within the FFR, telling Midi Olympique that he would like to know, for instance, what became of the €28m that the FFR earned during the 2007 World Cup that was held in France.Such questions are unlikely to go down well at the FFR, but they will surely strengthen the support of Laporte’s followers who, like him, believe that more transparency, less bureaucracy and above all, greater innovation are the key to revitalising French rugby.last_img read more

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Five talking points from the World Cup final

first_img Celebratory dance: New Zealand perform the haka after their RWC win. Photo: Getty Images TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS As New Zealand are crowned world champions for a record third time, Rugby World looks at the big questions to come out of RWC 2015 Should there be a Plate competition?Watching South Africa play Argentina in the third-place play-off on Friday night, in a stadium devoid of atmosphere (as much the fault of the stadium design as the game), debate in the press box centred on whether there should be a Plate competition for those teams finishing third in the pool.More to gain: Did Japan deserve to play in a Plate competition? Photo: Getty ImagesMaybe there’s even a case to copy the whole sevens model and introduce a Bowl and Shield competition so all 20 teams have something to play for throughout the tournament. It means everyone would get more meaningful and competitive fixtures, which can only help their games develop.Play the matches in midweek and you’d also maintain public interest in the tournament rather than have long weeks of press conference soundbites between knockout games as it stands. RWC 2015 has shown that there is an appetite for rugby at all levels – there just needs to be smart planning in terms of which grounds host which matches.The obvious answer against such a plan is cost. Housing 20 teams for nigh-on two months is a lot more expensive than housing just eight in the final couple of weeks. Perhaps a compromise is to introduce a Plate competition in 2019 for the teams finishing third in the pool – and if that proves successful, and not too cost prohibitive, a Bowl and Shield could be brought in come 2023.Are the southern hemisphere better at introducing league converts than the North?Sonny Bill Williams produced two sublime offloads in around a minute in the lead-up to Ma’a Nonu’s try in the World Cup final. Israel Folau also produced his best performance of the tournament. So why have these league converts delivered in a World Cup when many in the northern hemisphere can’t make the same impact?Code cracker: Sonny Bill Williams in action during the final. Photo: Getty ImagesPerhaps it’s because they’re given time to adapt Down Under. Sonny Bill learnt the game in the French second division with Toulon before becoming part of New Zealand’s 2011 World Cup-winning team. And he’s generally been used as an impact substitute by the All Blacks.Folau got to grips with things on the wing with the Waratahs before before making his Test bow and latterly being moved to full-back with great effect.Poor Sam Burgess was thrust into England’s midfield for a decisive World Cup pool game having stood out more as a back-row than a centre for his club Bath. Ironically, if he hadn’t played in RWC 2015 all this talk of a swift return to league would probably not be happening and by 2019 he could have developed into an outstanding back-row for England. Can New Zealand win a third straight world title?The All Blacks’ 34-17 win over Australia means they are the first team to win back-to-back World Cups. They have also dispensed with the idea that they can only lift the Webb Ellis Cup on New Zealand soil. The question now is whether they can win a third straight title in Japan in four years’ time.The likes of Richie McCaw, Dan Carter, Keven Mealamu, Conrad Smith and Ma’a Nonu will not be seen in a black shirt again, so do New Zealand have the talent to keep their run of success going? Unfortunately for the rest of the world the conveyor belt of talent doesn’t suffer many glitches in the Land of the Long White Cloud. For McCaw read Sam Cane, for Carter read Aaron Cruden, for Mealamu read Codie Taylor – and on it goes. The beauty of New Zealand succession planning also means that these players already have experience in Test rugby.The answer is clearly ‘yes’ in that they have the talent to win a third straight title – but they aren’t infallible. It is up to the rest of the world to ensure their own production lines keep turning and that they have developed their own games come Japan 2019. This Australia team, for one, has youth on its side, while Argentina, England and Wales also have plenty of faces who will still be around, if not hitting their peak, in four years. If those teams can raise their game and close the gap on the world champions, the black machine might well hit a roadblock.What do the home nations need to do to compete at RWC 2019?All in all, it was a disappointing World Cup for the northern hemisphere, not a single team making it to the semi-finals. Argentina have improved vastly in the past decade to keep pace with the big three, so what can the North do to catch up?Looking at it from the bottom up, getting more kids playing rugby and working on their skills is a start. When parents take their kids to a park, why not practise passing or have a game of touch rather than getting a football out. The handling skills and ability to find space of the southern hemisphere players are vastly ahead of their northern counterparts – and a lot of that is down to culture. Kids in New Zealand, and the Pacific Islands too, will grow up with a rugby ball always close at hand. They’ll play a game in break time at school or in the backyard at a weekend. Get mini players in the UK and Ireland focusing on skills before learning about rucking and scrummaging. Yes, contact is an important part of the game but so is passing and running.Turnover kings: Richie McCaw and David Pocock are both masters at the breakdown. Photo: Getty ImagesOne thing this World Cup highlighted was a need for an ball-winning back-row. Fetcher, snaffler, openside – call them what you will, but the ability of the likes of David Pocock and Richie McCaw to win turnovers is crucial to their team’s success. England need to find one fast.Finally, perhaps the North could do with a little more positivity. Just look what it’s done for Argentina. They used to be a forward-orientated side but now look to run the ball from anywhere. Maybe the Six Nations sides need to play with a little more adventure in attack.What’s happened to the southern hemisphere officials?The southern hemisphere may have dominated from a team perspective but the North came out on top when it came to the men in the middle. Welshman Nigel Owens refereed the final with England’s Wayne Barnes and France’s Jerome Garces on the touchline, while John Lacey was given the whistle for the Bronze final. So what happened to all the southern hemisphere officials?Top ref: Nigel Owens officiates at a scrum in the final. Photo: Getty ImagesCraig Joubert was the only southern hemisphere man to referee a kncokout match, and after that quarter-final decision – and sprint – he was obviously not considered for the latter stages.There’s long been debate over the consistency of refereeing between the North and South, but it now seems the northern officials are the ones dominating the international game. Joubert is now turning his attention to sevens ahead of the Olympics, so perhaps SANZAR need to look at their own refereeing structures to ensure that come 2019 they have officials in contention for the knockout games. League converts need time – you can’t expect them to understand all the nuances of the game after just a few matches. So bravo New Zealand and Australia for getting the best out of their cross-coders. Not so England.For the latest Rugby World subscription offers, click here.last_img read more

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Analysis: Will Chudley, the underrated heartbeat of Exeter Chiefs

first_img…before receiving a return on the loop. Taking the ball flat, Johnson attracts two defenders:Garner awarded the try without consulting the television match official. This was somewhat fortunate for Chiefs because Mitchell Lees slightly mistimes his decoy line here.Chudley runs behind his back-rower for a split-second, meaning Exeter could easily have been penalised for crossing:In the absence of a whistle though, there is a simple three-on-two. Chudley draws opposite number Dan Robson……and Slade assists Nowell:At this stage, Exeter were rampant and did not need to wait long for a third try.Selling dummiesThere was a training ground feel to this next score, Wasps failing to derail another drive:Despite rumbling towards the whitewash initially, the maul appears to lose momentum momentarily. At this point, Chudley calls runners onto the blindside.Robson responds, hauling across his wing Frank Halai and Thompson. Ashley Johnson also pulls himself out of the maul:Purposefully or otherwise, Chudley has coaxed a couple of Wasps bodies away from the defensive effort. Chiefs spin the opposite way, regather impetus and crash over.Fittingly, Chudley ended the first period with a characteristic piece of unglamorous graft.Rescue actChudley’s back-field coverage is highlighted earlier in this piece and, just before the break, more positional anticipation helped his side recover from a potentially tricky situation.This time, he must initially press into the primary defensive line because when Robson turns to find his fly-half, Wasps have six runners in the wide left channel. As soon as Gopperth shapes to kick though, Chudley turns to sprint after the ball.Seemingly chasing a lost cause, he perseveres and is able to reel it in a metre or so from the right touchline before passing to Dollman, who clears. The slideshow below tracks Chudley’s movement and emphasises his application:Three tries either side of the interval catapulted Wasps back into the contest, but Exeter rode the storm to make it 34-27 thanks to Waldrom’s third. Then came a crucial box-kick from Chudley that allowed Chiefs to retain the ascendancy.Making a slice of luckSlick restart receipts spread calm throughout a side, so this would have buoyed Exeter. Once more, Short is the catcher and Chudley the clearer.This time, his box-kick is so close to the touchline – precisely where scrum-halves are told to aim them – that Nathan Hughes suffers a momentary lapse of concentration.Allowing it to hit the floor, the in-form No 8 sees the ball bounce infield. Following up on the chase, Slade and replacement loosehead Carl Rimmer combine to recover possession:Because Chudley has held his ground in back-field after kicking, Welch passes to Julian Salvi from the ensuing breakdown:Still, the scrum-half makes up the 40 metres to reach the next ruck and deliver a pass to Steenson:Put simply, Chudley’s performance was non-stop.SnipingJust as we began, we will finish with a glance at some Chiefs phase-play with Chudley in the driving seat. Even before reaching this ruck, he swivels his head to the right, directing prospective runners:There are a few steps across-field to negate Wasps’ line-speed……and an inviting between Gopperth and Alapati Leiua is manufactured for Ian Whitten:Sure enough, the Ulsterman runs a nice outside arc to cross the gain-line:Tracking tirelessly, Chudley is swiftly on the scene. Scanning, he clocks that both Ed Shervington and Jake Cooper-Woolley have migrated to the openside before filling in the blindside guard:There is a tiny gap for Chudley to dart into:He scored from a very similar piece of opportunism on the same ground around seven months ago:And though Shervington and Simon McIntyre recover to shackle Chudley on this occasion, excellent support from Rimmer and his colleagues ensures Chiefs keep the ball:A few phases later, Moray Low shunts over:Exeter sit second in the Premiership table and, despite the loss of Slade, can be confident heading into a Champions Cup double-header against mighty Clermont.For Chudley, two fearsome fixtures represent an opportunity to reinforce his class on a grander stage. In May, he earned an England appearance at Twickenham against the Barbarians. In April, Exeter Chiefs and Wasps met on a sunny Sunday afternoon in Coventry and played out a topsy-turvy encounter that was won at the death by a stunning Joe Simpson try.Icy cool Gareth Steenson salvaged a losing bonus point for the visitors with a last-gasp drop-goal but the result was a significant sucker-punch in terms of their title hopes. Though Exeter promptly turned over Saracens at Allianz Park the next weekend, they missed out on the play-offs.Rob Baxter‘s charges place great onus on season-by-season improvement, so this Saturday would have felt extremely satisfying – bar a suspected broken leg sustained by the outstanding Henry Slade.Back in the West Midlands, Chiefs had four tries shortly after half an hour and ended with seven against a defence that had shipped two in their four previous fixtures. While Wasps mounted a resurgence to reach 27-27 in the second period, a domineering pack performance paved the way for a fantastic Exeter victory.Behind the forwards, Will Chudley gave another display of understated excellence. Having represented England Students during his time at Loughborough University, he was brought to Sandy Park three years ago in a typically astute Baxter signing following stints at Bedford and Newcastle.Since then, immense consistency and commitment have seen him rise steadily. Presently, Chudley is one of the very best in his position across this league. Here is how he inspired a truly emphatic win.Sparky decision-makingChiefs began the game by exerting huge pressure on their hosts, Tom Johnson stealing possession to foreshadow a 23-phase attack. From the off, Chudley probed the defensive line in front of him.These three consecutive phases demonstrate how he manipulated tacklers and unleashed Exeter runners. We begin as Chudley crabs into midfield from a ruck inside the Wasps 22. Watch Lorenzo Cittadini and James Gaskell. Neither inject line-speed because they are concerned about the scrum-half’s running threat:As a result, Chudley can send up Geoff Parling against a rather passive defence. No 8 Thomas Waldrom, who ended this clash with a hat-trick, and prop Ben Moon line up on either shoulder of their lock in an arrowhead formation – set either to take a short pass or resource the ensuing breakdown:Parling carries hard and Chudley is on the spot:Another couple of steps to the right hold Cittadini again before Chudley sends a long pass to full-back Phil Dollman. Looking to shut down space, George Smith shoots up. He disconnects from Cittadini, creating a ‘dogleg’:A step off his right foot takes Dollman past Smith and over the gain-line:With Steenson (circled) calling the shots, Chudley then plays in Waldrom, who is surrounded by supporting forwards:However, Smith resists the clear-out and manages to disrupt:Reacting rapidly, Chudley dives in to move the Australian openside off the ball:His quick thinking allows Exeter to retain the ball. Jack Nowell steps into the scrum-half role and the attack continues:Minutes later, Chudley showed similarly shrewd awareness in a defensive capacity.Positioning and persistenceAll game, Exeter managed territory with accurate authority. After a Steenson penalty had put Chiefs 3-0 ahead, Chudley passed back to Dollman, who cleared downfield.This slideshow depicts how Dollman chases his own kick (running past Chudley, who is circled) and follows up into the primary defensive line as Charles Piutau counters:Wasps remain on the front foot though, and locate some space on the right flank a couple of phases later.This next sequence shows how Chudley, adopting Dollman’s role in back-field, covers across to field a grubber from Sailosi Tagicakibau before sending the ball down-town:As a squad, Exeter ooze energy and industry. Epitomising both of these qualities, Chudley hares in pursuit of his own kick.Though Jimmy Gopperth and Ben Jacobs combine to manufacture some room for Elliot Daly, the Chiefs nine arcs back on himself to make a robust tackle:Of course, organisation and communication are two crucial attributes for any scrum-half. Both came to the fore as the visitors went over for their opening try.Guiding drivesBaxter has a fine lieutenant in Rob Hunter and Exeter’s lineout maul proved a potent weapon, splintering Wasps on numerous occasions. This first five-pointer required power and cohesion from the throw of skipper Jack Yeandle to the finish of Waldrom via Damian Welch‘s take, but Chudley’s nous also contributed:Battling through, Wasps Bradley Davies threatens to derail things entirely. While referee Greg Garner insists the Wales international lock is legal, Chudley incites a peel to the right:A reverse angle is insightful:And as the footage runs through, Chudley’s role is obvious:Sporting sages say a team is most vulnerable immediately after they have scored. Chudley ensured complacency did not creep in.Exit strategyThese days, a great deal of time and training are invested in collecting restarts and getting back into the opposition half. Following their opening try, Exeter executed this skill with sharp efficiency.The slideshow below captures a secure take from wing James Short and a pinpoint, contestable box-kick from Chudley. Slade is able to tear after it and tackle Guy Thompson. Johnson can swoop in to compete on the deck and, all of a sudden, Wasps are in a scrap to keep the ball:A Gopperth penalty reduced Exeter’s advantage to 8-3, but Chiefs were soon over the line once more.Pulling stringsWatching players pull off a set move probably ranks among the most gratifying experiences for a coach, so Baxter and co. would have been purring at this second try.The lineout provides the platform again. Yeandle hits Johnson, who feeds Chudley and a that shoots behind Steenson to find Sam Hill, who careers ahead:With a 25-metre blindside, Exeter bounce back to devastating effect:Examining the pattern step by step, we can appreciate how central Chudley is to an intricate strike move. First, as Slade and Nowell edge back towards the right-hand touchline, he flicks out a pass to Johnson… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Scrum-half Will Chudley was instrumental in an emphatic 41-27 victory for Exeter Chiefs over Wasps on Saturday evening. We take a closer look at one of the Aviva Premiership’s most underrated players.center_img Under the radar star: Will Chudley prepares to feed a scrum If Eddie Jones is serious about starting afresh and rewarding the best domestic players, Chudley should at least be considered for his Six Nations squad. Many thanks to BT Sport and Premiership Rugby for the match footage.last_img read more

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Opinion: Ben Ryan on the Premiership’s injury crisis

first_imgLaw 16.3 (b) A player must not intentionally fall or kneel in a ruck. This is dangerous play.Law 16.3 (c) A player must not intentionally collapse a ruck. This is dangerous play.THAT’S RIGHT – IT IS ‘DANGEROUS PLAY’ SO START APPLYING IT.The binding law on joining a ruck is also getting abused, but these three are the ones causing injury increases. Why? Because rucks are being collapsed on a monumental level; I could show you 20-30 examples a game. Huge pressure is put on knees and ankles, all against the natural movement of joints and ligaments.The attitude seems to be: don’t worry about binding or staying on your feet at a breakdown – just hammer into that player and then judo/saddle/crocodile roll him out of the way, using your weight and power.Pile-up: Ben Ryan believes enforcing the laws at rucks will reduce injuries. Photo: Getty ImagesIt’s so much easier to retain possession in attack these days by playing direct, collision-based rugby. I like to say run into a space not a face, but that no longer seems to apply. The result? For a start, it’s mind-numbingly boring.This lack of law application also means we’re getting more multi-phase plays as it’s harder to get the ball back. If you do go into a defensive ruck, you probably get smashed off your feet, so you stay out and throw two players into one tackle and try to get the ball back. The one defender who goes in to slow ball down or protect the back of the breakdown is a sacrificial lamb who gets smoked.Either way, you are getting uneven, dangerous collisions – and more of them. The injury stats all back this up. The majority (75+%) of injuries in rugby are collision based. The most common are concussion and injuries to knees and ankles, with shoulders and necks next. Fiji’s Olympic gold medal-winning coach Ben Ryan gives his thoughts on the high number of injuries in this season’s Aviva Premiership It’s a natural evolution. I do think the modern player spends too much time in the gym compared with skills training, but in many ways the game has driven that. It’s not about number of games or changing laws at youth level. It’s about enforcing the laws we already have.Read Ben Ryan’s columns every month in Rugby World magazine. There has been a lot of debate about the injury crisis in the Premiership. Playing too many games, apparently. Tackling should be banned in kids’ rugby, say Newcastle University academics. Strikes from players if it’s not sorted, possibly. Come off it.If we changed two things, injuries across all levels would reduce dramatically:1. Improve technique.2. Apply breakdown laws.I watch a lot of rugby across all levels and tackle technique needs to improve. I see coaches put videos on social media showing terrible technique. If they can’t see what a correct and safe tackle looks like, how can the player?FOR THE LATEST SUBSCRIPTION OFFERS, CLICK HEREThe majority of injuries sustained in a tackle are due to bad technique: a head down, a hit with a straight not a wrapped arm, feet too far away from the tackled player and a helicopter-type failing of legs occurring. Timing also plays a part but, again, constantly practising correct technique will reduce all this. It is a simple skill that needs replication and understanding.Any player or coach should be able to recite the key points of good tackle technique like a favourite song. Head up, hands up, on your toes, accelerate, settle, the hit – head up, cheek to cheek, wrap your arms, chase your feet.However, it’s the second change that will make the biggest difference. The boffins at Newcastle did say one thing that was very true: changes in sports laws can dramatically lower injury rates. In rugby we don’t even need to go that far – just apply them properly.Sidelined: Danny Cipriani will be out for up to 12 weeks with an injury sustained in Wasps’ game with Harlequins. Photo: Getty ImagesI see law after law being broken at the breakdown in games. If a law is being ‘ignored’ because it makes the game better and improves player safety, I’m all for it. But this does the opposite. Why are the following laws being ignored?Law 16.3 (a) Players in a ruck must endeavour to stay on their feet.center_img Body blow: Billy Vunipola is out for four months after needing knee surgery. Photo: Getty Images LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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TMO controversies involving England

first_img“The key point is the moment that Vos tackled him, the ball is touching Tim’s hand. When you freeze the frame, it is touching his hand. I still think on the whole that it is a penalty try and that the referee would have given it if he didn’t have the TV ref.“The law says that when you tackle, the player must be in control of the ball but I don’t think Tim was in control of the ball.”Disgruntled, England hit back to win the second Test 27-22 in Bloemfontein.England v New Zealand, 2018England lose outEngland’s first meeting with the All Blacks in more than four years lived up to the hype, with the teams separated by a point as the game reached the final minutes.Then Courtney Lawes charged down a kick by TJ Perenara and Sam Underhill seized the ball and sold Beauden Barrett a dummy to score a try that brought the house down.Ah, hold on. Rugby’s TMO system can be the ultimate party-pooper and, after an agonising delay, Marius Jonker decided that Lawes was offside when he rushed towards Perenara to make his crucial intervention.“He was just about in the half-back’s back pocket,” said All Blacks coach Steve Hansen, agreeing with the decision.Others, such as the succinct Austin Healey, begged to differ – see this post on the incident.Yes or no? Jerome Garces (left) and Marius Mitrea await the TMO’s verdict at Twickenham (Getty Images)England coach Eddie Jones hit the right note in the post-match press conference. “Sometimes the game loves you and sometimes the game doesn’t love you.“You must accept that if you stay in the fight long enough, the game will love you. And we’re prepared to stay in the fight, so we’ll get some love from the game further down the track.”In other words, you’ve got to take the rough with the smooth.England v Wales, 2018In England’s favour Another incident involving Jérôme Garcès, referee for England’s 16-15 loss to the All Blacks.England led Wales 12-0 in this year’s Six Nations clash when, in the 24th minute, Rhys Patchell’s deflected attacking kick saw Gareth Anscombe and Anthony Watson in a desperate foot race to touch down the spinning ball.It was too tight to call on initial viewing but replays showed that Anscombe’s hand had got there first. However, TMO Glenn Newman ruled that the Welsh full-back hadn’t controlled the ball. England went to win 12-6.Slide rule: Wales’ Gareth Anscombe, right, claims the try as Anthony Watson cradles the ball (AFP/Getty)“I still can’t understand why the TMO didn’t give the try to Anscombe,” complained Wales coach Warren Gatland afterwards. “The wording was the grounding wasn’t clear, but we’ve had a look at it from a few angles and you can clearly see he has his hand on the ball.“That’s a big moment in the game, especially to get it wrong in front of 82,000 people.”World Rugby later admitted the decision was wrong, which prompted an irritated response from England coach Eddie Jones. “You can’t have retrospective refereeing. The game’s done and dusted, so we’ve got to trust the referees and respect their integrity,” he said. England v South Africa, 2018In England’s favourEngland could be two wins from two this autumn or, just as easily, no wins from two. In the opening Quilter International, as South Africa sought the score they needed to win the match at the death, André Esterhuizen was carrying the ball when he was brought to an abrupt halt by Owen Farrell’s thumping tackle.The ball went loose and England kicked it out and celebrated a 12-11 success. But hang on, was the tackle legal? It looked suspect, to say the least.Sudden impact: Owen Farrell tackles Andre Esterhuizen as the England-SA match ends in drama (Getty)Referring the incident ‘upstairs’ to TMO Olly Hodges, referee Angus Gardner was able to look again on the big screen. He decided there was enough of an attempt by Farrell to wrap his arm. No penalty, so no opportunity for Handre Pollard to try to kick the winning goal.Opinion was divided, as you can imagine. “To me it was and remains the clearest of penalties. Straight shoulder, penalty,” wrote Stuart Barnes. “Patriotic English fans talked of an attempt to ‘wrap’ the other arm but the left arm was nowhere near on contact. I suggest that officials stop using the word ‘attempt’. There either is or there isn’t.”Many disagreed, such as former Wales centre Tom Shanklin… LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram. False hope: Sam Underhill caps his great performance v NZ with a try that was ruled out on review (Getty) center_img TMO controversies involving EnglandEngland were denied probable victory against New Zealand after a contentious late call by the Television Match Official (TMO) led to Sam Underhill’s ‘winning try’ being disallowed.It’s the latest in a long line of TMO controversies – and there will be many more to come. Human error, or human accuracy, is part and parcel of the game and doesn’t it give us lots to talk about! Here are seven TMO incidents from down the years just involving England…England v South Africa, 2007England lose outThe grand daddy of TMO controversies because it occurred in a World Cup final that, at that stage of the match, was still in the balance.England were trailing 9-3 soon after half-time when Mathew Tait made a great line break to get within five metres of the Springboks line. Going to the short side, Jonny Wilkinson flicked a pass out for Mark Cueto to dive over in the corner – under pressure from No 8 Danie Rossouw’s despairing tackle.Cruel call: Mark Cueto scores in the 2007 World Cup final, only for the score to be rubbed off (Getty Images)The decision was referred to TMO Stuart Dickinson and, thanks to a communication breakdown with French TV producers, took an age to arrive. The Australian finally decided Cueto’s foot had brushed the touchline before the ball was grounded.“As a player you generally know when you are in or not. For me, it was 100% a try,” said Cueto in the aftermath of that 15-6 defeat for England at the Stade de France.“My foot came off the ground as I went over the line. I was amazed when it wasn’t awarded – I couldn’t believe it. At that stage we were six points behind. It would have taken us to within one. Wilko would probably have converted it and we’d have been a point up. Neither team was that close to scoring throughout the game so that could have been it really.”The passage of time hasn’t changed his mind. More recently the former Sale wing said: “It was the early days of TMO. I’ve seen far less obvious sorts of tries given. In any other game, I’m convinced it would have been given.”England v Australia, 2017In England’s favourIt doesn’t take much to wind up Michael Cheika and last autumn he was practically frothing at the mouth after three TMO calls went against his side.Australia had two tries ruled out on review while TMO Simon McDowell took four minutes to decide that Elliot Daly’s try could stand, deeming that the ball hadn’t grazed the touchline before he gathered it.The decision to rule out Marika Koroibete’s try on 69 minutes, with England clinging to a 13-6 lead, so enraged Wallaby coach Cheika that he was seen to shout “f***ing cheats”, for which he received a warning from the Disciplinary Officer for the Autumn Internationals.Angry man: Michael Cheika tries to stay calm after Marika Koroibete’s try is chalked off last year (Getty)Koroibete was turtled over the try-line by a last-ditch Chris Robshaw tackle. An extended roll by the Wallaby suggested he got the ball down but, after numerous replays, it was decided that Stephen Moore had obstructed Robshaw from making a “clean tackle”.To rub salt in the wound, a flurry of late points gave England a 30-6 victory. Asked if England were lucky, Eddie Jones said: “How are we lucky? Why do we have referees? Why do we have television match officials? They do ten replays of the video and they make a decision.”England v Scotland, 2007In England’s favourJonny Wilkinson’s comeback match at the start of the 2007 Six Nations – after a 1,169-day absence because of injuries – went like a dream. His 27 points that day, in a 42-20 victory, remains an individual record for a Calcutta Cup match.His try that day, however, was described by Scotland coach Frank Hadden as a “farce”. Contrary to the verdict of TMO Donal Courtenay, video evidence showed that Wilkinson had gone into touch before grounding the ball.“What’s the point of having a TMO if they get it so horribly wrong?” said Hadden. “It’s hugely irritating. It’s not humanly possible to make that mistake. It was so obviously wrong.”Touch and go: Jonny Wilkinson scores v Scotland in 2007, a try that left Frank Hadden incredulous (AFP)You’ve been framed: Andre Vos tackles Tim Stimpson in the incident that decided the 2000 first Test between the Boks and England (Getty)Wilkinson admitted that he hadn’t been sure if it had been a legitimate try. “When I went over in the corner I felt it was touch and go with getting the ball down and my foot down,” said the fly-half. “That is what the video ref is for. Hopefully it was a try. I am not one for accepting things otherwise.”Incidentally, the referee for that match was South African Marius Jonker, the TMO involved in the Sam Underhill disallowed try incident at the weekend.South Africa v England, 2000England lose outEngland’s drawn series in South Africa early in this millennium was seen as the first significant staging post towards the 2003 World Cup triumph. It might have been even better for Clive Woodward’s men because in the first Test in Pretoria, lost 18-13, England were denied in controversial fashion.Trailing 15-10, Mike Catt put in a cross-kick that looked certain to be collected and touched down by Tim Stimpson. As the right-wing reached for the ball, he was clattered by Boks captain Andre Vos. Penalty try!But no, because TMO Mark Lawrence ruled that Stimpson’s fingers were touching the ball as the tackle came in. He awarded a knock-on.Woodward initially argued that Stimpson was tackled without the ball but later said: “I just watched it again and to be fair I can see why he didn’t give it. I still think it was a try but I can see why he technically ruled that way. After Sam Underhill’s disallowed try that denied England victory over the All Blacks, Rugby World looks at other TMO controversies that have affected the men in white…last_img read more

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Hotshot: Newcastle and England U20 full-back Josh Hodge

first_imgThis article originally appeared in the October 2019 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. What’s been your career highlight? The U20 World Cup. As a team it didn’t go the way we wanted, but just to be top in some of the stats is a confidence boost.You got 24 kicks out of 24… Yes. And I believe if you go back to the miss I had in the Italy Six Nations game it’s 40 from 40! You’ve got to respect every kick.What are your goals for this season?To improve my all-round game, increase my confidence and to take my opportunities.What do you do away from rugby? I started a sports coaching degree at Newcastle University last year. I don’t know if I’ll carry on as it’s hard with training as well, but I want to make sure I have options.I also like clay pigeon shooting – I did GB U21 at 15 – and will do a session with my dad.RW VERDICT: David Beckham and Jonny Wilkinson were his childhood heroes, and he is certainly replicating the latter in terms of his form from the tee. The Championship is a great competition for this teenager to gain first-team experience with Newcastle. Over time: Josh Hodge scores a try for England U20 against Wales (Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img The teenager grew up playing multiple sports and is known for his accurate goalkicking Newcastle and England U20 full-back Josh Hodge Date of birth 23 May 2000 Born Lancaster Club Newcastle Country England Position Full-backHow did you get into rugby?At primary school, when I was nine. Then I went to Sedbergh School on a sports scholarship – it was a joint running and rugby one, although I hadn’t played much rugby.Did you play other sports? I was quite football-focused and was in the Preston North End Academy from age seven, but going to Sedbergh meant I couldn’t make training. I played a bit of Sunday league, but when I got picked up by the Falcons in lower sixth I stopped football.What positions have you played? Back three. I’ve played ten a few times but it didn’t go so great. I prefer full-back as it gives me more time on the ball and there’s a lot more decision-making; I like the pressure. I don’t mind wing either.What are your strengths? Kicking is a big part of my game. I love it. I’ve had hip problems from kicking too much and it has been a learning curve. I now have a routine and look after my body better. I’d also say I’m elusive runner – the coaches say I’m unpredictable.Who’s been the biggest influence on you? Definitely my parents. They make every effort to come and support me.last_img read more

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Title IV continues to attract debate

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK [Episcopal News Service] Episcopal Church canons have expressed concern about clergy behavior since the General Convention in 1789 made it wrong for clergy — except “for their honest necessities” — to “resort to taverns, or other places most liable to be abused to licentiousness.”That original Canon 13 also warned that clergy who “[gave] themselves to base or servile labor, or to drinking or riot, or to spending their time idly” would face a range of disciplinary actions.The church ever since has been refining its answer to the question of how best to discipline errant clergy. The tradition continued at the recent 77th meeting of General Convention when bishops and deputies tweaked the current version of the Title IV disciplinary canons that have been in use for just more than a year. And there could well be more changes to come.The 2012 adjustments, accomplished via Resolution A033, primarily involved clarification of certain definitions, as well refining and clarifying parts of the process.However, the bishops and deputies meeting in July 5-12 in Indianapolis also told the church’s Standing Commission on Constitution and Canons to undertake a comprehensive review over the next three years of Title IV’s implementation. Resolution C049, proposed by the Diocese of Albany, directs the standing commission to determine “the extent to which the elements of safety, truth-telling, healing, and reconciliation are being effected” as first intended by the 2006 resolution (2006-A153), which authorized the work that resulted in the current iteration.Convention also agreed with the Diocese of Central Florida’s request (in Resolution C116) to have Constitution and Canons review the constitutionality of two provisions of Title IV. One gives the presiding bishop authority to restrict the ministry of a diocesan bishop for an alleged offense without the consent of the diocese’s standing committee or, in the case of alleged abandonment, without the consent of the church’s three senior bishops as was required in the prior version of Title IV.The other involves Title IV’s perceived violation of Article IX in the church’s Constitution, which says priests and deacons “shall be tried by a Court instituted by the Convention of the Diocese.” Some dioceses, including Central Florida, have questioned whether General Convention can prescribe a church-wide system for disciplining diocesan clergy because they contend Article IX allocates that authority to the dioceses. Such a church-wide system has existed since at least 1994.The drafters of the current version of Title IV, which went into effect July 1, 2011, always anticipated the need for changes.“You can’t institute the scope of the changes to the new Title IV without tweaks that need to be worked out,” Diane Sammons, chancellor of the Diocese of Newark, who just completed a six-year term on the Constitution and Canons commission (the last three as chair), said during a recent interview with ENS. “Everybody on the [commission] understood that and everybody that’s worked with Title IV understands that there’s not going to be perfection in the first draft of it and that we’re going to have to continue to live and breathe it and make changes while staying, hopefully, loyal to the concepts of it and the theology behind it.”Steve Hutchinson, Diocese of Utah chancellor who chaired of the House of Deputies’ legislative committee on canons during convention, agreed, adding that “we know we probably didn’t get them all and there’ll be a few more, and maybe some that nobody’s thought yet” — that refinements, but “not big sweeping changes of direction or philosophy,” were anticipated.Sammons added that maintaining a balance between perfecting the canons while remaining true to their new spirit is “going to be the challenge.”Part of the challenge comes because at least some Episcopalians dislike the revised Title IV.Some objections to the revised Title IV“Procedurally it’s a disaster. In terms of what it’s done to clergy rights it’s more than a disaster,” Diocese of Newark Alternate Deputy Michael Rehill told ENS. “It needed basic total revision. It was adopted hastily without anybody apparently having any thought about how it was actually going to work in some respects.”In other ways, Rehill, insists, the drafters knew exactly what they were doing. He says their intent was to take away “all the rights of clergy” and give “incredible power to bishops to get rid of priests.”Rehill, a former Diocese of Newark chancellor, is the chief operating officer of Canon Lawyer, which defends Episcopal clergy in disciplinary matters.And, the Rev. Canon Christopher Seitz, the Rev. Dr. Philip Turner, the Rev. Dr. Ephraim Radner and attorney Mark McCall, writing for the Anglican Communion Institute, have consistently opposed the revised Title IV and some of its applications. In October 2011 they called Title IV “a bad canon being implemented badly.” They called for its repeal and a return the previous version, which they said “provides adequate due process for those charged, does not expand unconstitutionally the powers of the Presiding Bishop, and not least is understood by those charged with administering it.”The four men’s summary of objections points to the crux of the Title IV dispute. Their first concern is related to the theological shift in the revision, the second deals speaks to the change in discipline of bishops and the latter might be credited to the fact that the church is still learning how to implement the new Title IV.Shortly after the four first voiced their objections, Hutchinson joined Duncan Bayne, Diocese of Olympia vice chancellor, and Joseph Delafield, Diocese of Maine chancellor, to publish a paper they said “conclusively establishes the constitutionality” of Title IV.How the church got to the new Title IVThe concern about due process expressed by the institute writers, Rehill and others is the fruit of major changes in philosophy and approach reflected in the revised Title IV. The seed for change dates to at least 2000 when General Convention called for a task force to assess the way the church disciplined clergy via Title IV and other methods.At that time the then-current version of Title IV had been in use for just four years, General Convention having approved in 1994, and implemented two years later, a system based on the U.S. Armed Forces’ code of military justice (current version here). The 1994-96 version of Title IV stemmed from a wave of Episcopal clergy sexual misconduct cases that dated to at least 1986.That version of Title IV aimed to give clarity and uniformity (including a uniform court system) to disciplinary processes that in large part had been left up to individual dioceses, ENS reported in a Sept. 1994 press release. The churchwide canons, unchanged since their creation in 1915, were intended to deal primarily with issues of heresy and doctrine, ENS reported.Until the 1970s, cases of clergy misconduct were usually handled privately by the bishops and those clergy accused of misconduct, Robert Royce, former chancellor of the Diocese of Long Island and the principal author of the SCCC’s resolution, told ENS at the time.Sammons noted during her interview with ENS that the Episcopal Church was applauded in 1994 “because it came up with a disciplinary system that was no-nonsense. And that was a critical thing at that time. That gave us credibility. It gave us a system that supported victims, especially women, coming forward in a way that other churches and institutions still haven’t done” for either women or children.However, by 2000, Title IV was being criticized because it was perceived as “overly militaristic and rigid in its application” and that it “lacked a theological foundation.” Thus, convention called for a review of Title IV.Paying attention to the theology of disciplineIn the Task Force on Disciplinary Policy and Procedure’s report to the 2003 meeting of convention, the members wondered how the church’s mission of the reconciliation of people to God and each other in Christ could be interpreted in the canons to “include that essential note and still hold offenders accountable in meaningful ways.” The task force concluded that the church needed to “begin anew with Title IV” because it would “not be possible to accomplish what we hope for ourselves by making even major adjustments to Title IV as it presently exists.”It commissioned an essay, “Some Thoughts Toward Canon Revision: Canons as Gift of Grace and Dance of Love” (found in the task force’s 2003 Blue Book report) by the Rev. Pamela Cooper-White. The task force called it a “catalyst for further conversation in the church on the theology of discipline.” Cooper-White, an Episcopal priest who now teaches at Columbia Theological Seminary in Decatur, Georgia, suggested that canon law is “a God-given expression of care for the ordering of the church that is grounded not merely in restraint of evil (as often is the case in secular law), but focused on creating a community in which every member is supported in living a life grounded in desire for God, and the joy of being in harmony with the original goodness of God’s creation.”The task force asked for, and received, the authority to continue its work in the 2003-2006 triennium, but warned that it might not be able to accomplish the sweeping changes it was contemplating within those three years.In fact, the task force proposed to the 2006 convention a completely revised Title IV which its chair, Diocese of Indianapolis Bishop Catherine Waynick, said at the time “reclaim[ed] the broader meaning of discipline as the developing of habits which can form all members of the Church in healthy and responsible ministries and which can produce reconciliation and healing when failures occur.”The proposed revision turned Title IV away from the criminal-justice model and towards one that was based on disciplinary systems used in other professions, such as doctors, lawyers and licensed social workers. The latter models are characterized by an obligation on the part of the professional to cooperate with investigations. Thus, for instance, they cannot refuse to testify in disciplinary proceedings by attempting to invoke the secular law right against self-incrimination.General Convention balked at the task force’s proposal to make certain lay leaders subject to Title IV. Others thought the new processes were too complicated, especially for smaller dioceses.But convention decided to keep trying. It passed Resolution A153 to create a new task force, and gave it a list of “critical goals, concerns, and values,” including moving Title IV “towards a reconciliation model for all appropriate circumstances,” encouraging early resolution of conflicts and reconciliation of the persons “at the earliest appropriate time and the lowest appropriate level of the church.” Any new proposal was meant to also “maintain the historic pastoral role and canonical authority of bishops” and respect the “roles, rights, and integrity” of people subject to Title IV and of “injured persons, communities, parishes, missions, congregations, and the church.”In 2009, convention adopted the current version of Title IV, which bases itself, according to its first canon, on the premise that “the Church and each Diocese shall support their members in their life in Christ and seek to resolve conflicts by promoting healing, repentance, forgiveness, restitution, justice, amendment of life and reconciliation among all involved or affected.”The laity is not subject to the disciplinary process it outlines, but the revision codified the 2006 plan to take clergy discipline out of a criminal-justice model.Rehill told ENS that in 2009, “the clergy at General Convention could not have possibly understood what they were actually doing.” He said that the revision was quickly approved “when the convention’s attention was focused on the Anglican Communion and the issues of human sexuality.”The revision “just raced through being marketed as taking ‘legalism’ out of the disciplinary process and making it pastoral rather than legalistic,” he said, adding that “there’s nothing pastoral at all in the new Title IV.”Others, including Hutchinson and Sammons, say that the nine-year process of revising Title IV included soliciting input from laity and clergy. Hutchinson said that, especially since 2008, the constitution and canons committee, and other groups, “have provided numerous opportunities and request for input, criticisms, suggestions and so forth all across the church for people to weigh in on anything they thought could be improved or was wrong, or anything about Title IV, and we never heard from [Rehill].”A change in approachHutchinson, who has been involved in Title IV revisions since at least 1994 and who is “admittedly pretty invested in the pursuit of something that we think would better serve the legitimate interests of the church,” says the current version speaks “ultimately what are we about as an enterprise, what do we stand for and what kind of systems, processes and theological constructs do we have that reflect those interests.”Sammons said the current version balances aspects of a professional-conduct model “with a heavy dose of trying to administer at every step of the process a sense of pastoral care and theology.”She told ENS that, despite objections about a loss of due process, clergy will benefit from the new procedures. While they no longer have the “criminal rights” afforded them under the old Title IV, they and the people they may have injured also are not subjected to an adversarial process from the very beginning.“You do not want to discourage people who are really victims from having a prompt and just resolution of their problem,” she said. “But it’s really designed to see if there’s a way to work it out first through communication without a punitive process, and that’s the benefit to the clergy.”And the complaint that clergy have lost rights, Hutchinson notes, is based on a series of privileges afforded to clergy only for the last 16 years since the 1994 revision went into effect in 1996. Yet, Sammons acknowledged, “if you have a right, you want to be able to stand on it, and you want more rights. You don’t want them taken away. It’s just not intuitively natural for people to want to give up rights, even if they are receiving something perhaps more beneficial in return.”The basis of the efforts to revise the church’s approach to clergy discipline that began in 2000, Sammons said, was “that notion that we live in community and therefore we’re all responsible to each other, and part of our Christian responsibility is to be reconciled at the same time.”The current Title IV, she said, carries with it assumption that reconciliation and healing “should be always a part of our disciplinary code.”“So it shouldn’t just be uncovering the harm,” she said. “It should also be restoring people back to community, and that includes the clergy, and our system had never focused on that.”Living into new Title IV has had some bumps, both Hutchinson and Sammons acknowledge.“There have been unfortunately a small number of cases that have gotten out of control because [of] respondents or counsel for respondents in particular not wanting to play by the new rules and the people in the disciplinary system not realizing that they have the authority to control and manage the timing and expense elements of the process more than they have been doing,” Hutchinson said.And, because the focus has not been on reconciliation and restoration, he said Title IV is “still going to be a work in progress as we go forward and we continue to understand relationships within the church and discipline, but also what does it mean to be a reconciling forum for people who have had some very serious problems or hurt some people in very serious ways.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA J. Eric Thompson says: Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab The Rev. John T. Farrell, Ph.D. says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI August 28, 2012 at 4:53 pm I worked with a priest on a volunteer basis for nearly 10 years.. I served as clerk of the vestry for 5 years and the vestry was never approached about our rector taking another job. We learned this a few years later. At that time the Diocese of L.I. did not allow for worker priests. (I’m not sure if it still does.) This priest also has been on the budget committee for a number of years making sure of a salary increase. This priest has worn the vestry to a frazzle and is very proud of the power and its control. This priest has violated both diocesan policy and church canons and, yet, the vestry nor any parishioner has reported this priest. The church needs to educate its leaders to prevent this kind of behavior reoccurring in the future and if does reoccur, know how to respond. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC August 17, 2012 at 9:39 pm Watching a mentor being subject to 12 years prohibition at the age of 68 obviates any notion of repentance forgiveness and reconciliation. There is no grace or mercy for this priest who spent his life in Mother Church. There is a persecutory aspect of this application of Title IV which, I believe, is not of God. October 23, 2013 at 6:27 am I am dismayed to see so little concern about the plight of complainants. We are not the enemy of the church; we raise our voices to make the church safer. Because speaking up takes such a toll on victims of clergy sexual misconduct, most of us remain silent. Many of us only report offenses when we believe that our offenders pose a risk to others in the church. We speak our painful truth to protect the church from harm.Most of these commenters express concern about the Title IV process “ruining careers” and harming clergy in other ways. Where is the concern about the ruined lives of victims? The church is supposed to be a sanctuary. Priests (as confessors, as pastoral guides, as the hand that offers the sacraments) hold enormous trust from congregants. When a priest abuses this trust to meet his or her own needs, he or she can destroy the victim’s faith in clergy, in church, or even in God. When the church responds by protecting its own, victims are exiled from community at our greatest time of need. “Ruined careers” are the least of the wounds that we have to deal with.I agree with Rev. Farrell: Title IV is a stacked system, but it isn’t stacked against clergy. By “encouraging early resolution of conflicts and reconciliation of the persons at the earliest appropriate time and the lowest appropriate level of the church,” Title IV fails to acknowledge the profound damage that sexual misconduct causes to its victims. By seeking a quick fix, Title IV protects the church against the hard work of justice and truth. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Fr. Jay Pierce says: August 19, 2012 at 11:22 pm I am not certain as to what constitutes an adequate amount of time for bringing another rector on board. As I recall it took close to two years between a rector that had been in the service of the church I attend for 14 years and was dismissed under allegations of inappropriate contact with minors and the most recent that has now departed to a parish in the Houston area. This time around, the Episcopal Diocese of Texas informed us that we had taken entirely too long to find a replacement rector the last time we were in search. So this time around it only took us about 60 days with the Vestry itself performing the task of search committee rather than establishing a separate entity for that purpose. I should hasten to add that, in our case due to declining attendance, the Diocese informed us they would not support a decision in regards to another full time rector and therefore we now have a Priest in Charge instead. August 15, 2012 at 9:30 pm Perhaps the reason the comment in the ENS article referred to a “system based on the U.S. Armed Forces code of military justice” was because that is exactly what was said by one of the people on the Title IV revision committee at a mandated diocesan clergy training session which I attended a couple of years ago (and which the author of this article did not). I specifically remember the allusion to “conduct unbecoming an officer”. So much has been said on this subject I’m not sure who can keep it all straight. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET August 14, 2012 at 11:28 pm In my experience in witnessing the execution of the current Title IV process there have been many inconsistencies, with pastoral care given to respondents being one of the most egregious. On one hand the process is nothing but adversarial, and on the other a Diocese bends over backwards to be seen as compassionately working to restore the ministry of a priest. I realize that all circumstances are different. But there must be some level of consistency to which the process and those who execute it are held. You simply cannot expect lay or clergy who have no experience, expertise, or penchant for such serious and complicated disciplinary proceedings to truly understand the intricacies of the process and execute it fairly.In addition, there should be a much stronger emphasis put on the fact that a clergy person is innocent until they are proven guilty, as the canon clearly states. The stigma placed upon clergy and their families by their colleagues and parishioners (due to a lack of understanding of the canons, in many cases) as they spiral through a process which seemingly has no end is unbelievably cruel and lacks consideration to the thought that the respondent may be vindicated in the end.There are so many unanswered questions: What special provisions for pastoral care have been given to the priests stuck in the middle of such a fluid and changing process while it gets “smoothed” out? Why isn’t each Diocese required to provide a counselor experienced in crisis management AND the Title IV canons to affected parishes that are suddenly plunged into the process without warning? Who watches over the process to ensure that bishops do not intentionally or unintentionally abuse the system? I realize that each respondent has the right to their own counsel, but who in the Church protects and advocates for the “innocent” when the “innocent” is, in the end, the respondent? How does the Church reconcile itself to the respondent when it is clearly proven that the process has unreasonably and quite permanently damaged their life, ministry, and by extension their family and their flock, whether they are found guilty or not? Elaine Jenkins says: Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA Len Freeman says: David Wilson says: Rector Knoxville, TN By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Aug 14, 2012 August 28, 2012 at 2:43 pm Any system that permits hearsay and attempts to silence respondents (or at best give them the Hobson’s choice of how to proceed) will sooner or later face lawsuits, and rightfully so. It certainly will not foster reconciliation. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Jobs & Calls August 14, 2012 at 11:31 pm Our secular criminal justice system has at times made for great theatre. Whether such drama has uncovered the actual truth of wrong-doing has many times been questioned. It should be remembered that our secular court system is divided into the Grand and Petit juries. It is while Petit juries are in session that the aforementioned drama tends to take place. It has always struck me that the Grand jury process tends to be the more dispassionate of the two and perhaps that, in and of itself, should be cause for examining that model more closely as the more heated and contentious the debate becomes, the more reason has a tendency to be kicked to the curb. Perhaps a review of Judge Harold J. Rothwax’ “Guilty; The Collapse of Criminal Justice” could prove instructive.Then there is the financial costs. In this instance the church, not supposedly being a vehicle for monetary gain, needs to review compensation practices for legal council on both sides of any given Title IV case. The lawfirm of Fulbright & Jaworski of Houston, Texas the Episcopal Church is not.I will not argue with repentance and acceptance of responsibility on the part of the offender being necessary for reconciliation. However, I would remind all sides here that the adversarial judicial system we have was not designed to provide for reconciliation, rather it goes back more to the notion of an eye for an eye. In most cases in the secular world where reconciliation took place such occurred only after the court case was settled. Judith Wood says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET March 13, 2013 at 1:33 pm Those are my objections to the new Canon IV and I speak as a member of my diocese’s ecclesiastical court. Canon IV allows for anonymous accusations and vague charges that leave clergy unable to defend themselves. Canon IV attempts to silence the accused with gag orders whose design seems to be to isolate and marginalize them. Canon IV allows bishops to issue “temporary” inhibitions that deprive clergy of the means to make a living and of the spiritual solace of administering the sacraments. And finally, beyond the appointment of an advisor, Canon IV places the burden of defending oneself entirely on the accused with no support — either financially, emotionally, or spiritually — from their diocese or ordinary. Canon IV is a stacked system and I’m ashamed to have become involved with it. My only reasons for staying are to assist its inevitable clergy victims and to work to change a major source of injustice within the church. Rector Tampa, FL Susan Michelfelder says: Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC August 16, 2012 at 11:36 am A disciplinary complaint is, by definition, adversarial. The new Title IV is terribly cumbersome and stories of its visiting abuse on clergy–both intentionally and unintentionally–abound. The safeguards for the accused from the 1994 version were more than adequate. The newest revision has brought no more benefits to the victims than was the case under the 1994 revision.And that is not to mention the multiplicity of complaints against bishops that has occurred because no one can really say “no” to the complainant–and these are by and large not complaints of sexual abuse–because the Intake Officer and Panel of Reference may believe, with all good intentions, that they need to let the investigation go forward on patently absurd claims. Although the claim that this is not adversarial is given as the basis for not informing the accused or advising him or her of the progress or even interviewing the accused during the investigation, the net effect is that the process is certainly perceived as adversarial by the accused. The drafters of the new revision not have intended for these investigations to be adversarial, but if it walks like a duck and quacks like a duck . . . Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA General Convention 2012 Press Release Service Neal Michell says: Donald Jack Newsom says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Donald Jack Newsom says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Tags Title IV continues to attract debate Convention’s changes to disciplinary canons are part of a long journey Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem August 14, 2012 at 8:10 pm Clergy misconduct is serious. It effects not only the victim of this misconduct, but the parish, the diocese and the greater Church. When clergy skirt responsibility for their behavior by leaving for another diocese, the problems just multiply. Inappropriate relationships with parishioners and others who have a professional or pastoral relationship with the clergy person involved are not about human sexuality, they are about power and control. The church could learn a lot about discipline from other disciplines, such as establishing a nationwide directory of persons found guilty of abuse needs to be established and available to all dioceses. Reconciliation is only possible when there is repentance and responsibility on the part of the offender. It should not be quick and easy. To accept an apology without repentance and change of behavior is irresponsible and will continue to effect the Church. Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Donald Jack Newsom says: General Convention, August 15, 2012 at 7:22 am The pace of adequately sorting out these types of entanglements has always managed to bedevil those who want a quick fix to things. It is on such occasions as this that I wonder if inventing the transistor was necessarily a good thing. Now we seem to want instant gratification in everything that we do. Too many have lost the notion of patients being a virtue. Rector Bath, NC Sheldon Schweikert says: Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector Columbus, GA August 15, 2012 at 10:03 am The most egregious example of the effect of “new” Title IV Canons was the attempted lynching and assembly of a kangaroo court in Province IV to run Bishop Mark Lawrence of the Diocese of South Carolina out of the Church for disloyalty to TEC. Or course there was nary a mention of it in an ENS article. Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Pam Strobel says: August 14, 2012 at 9:03 pm There are definitely bad guys and gals who need to get their heads handed to them. Having said that, my own experience with Title IV has seen three clergy get essentially wiped out from their ministries, with no support for them, and equally as important no support for their families. Lives given to service of the church suddenly declared personas non grata, functionally forbidden to speak with anyone in their own defense. The financial costs have been incredible… approaching $50k in one case… and when it was clear that even if they would be cleared, if something came up again the clearing would not miitigate having to go through the financial ruin a second time… the person then said the heck with it, and walked away from the ministry. That is a travesty of both justice and the gospel. Forgiveness is nowhere within this current system, nor is grace. Comments (17) Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA Nicole Keller says: Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR August 15, 2012 at 1:53 am The foundation of criminal law in the US is the requirement of a level of evidence necessary to satisfy the mind of the jury “beyond a reasonable doubt” in order to convict. In addition there is a large body of law that addresses the evidence that can be presented. In reading Title IV I see little in the way of acknowledgement of these principals of justice. There is no doubt that we require a system to receive, investigate and bring to trial acquisitions made against priests and deacons. But I feel we’re getting the horse before the cart. In the haste to respond to public pressure to “do something” we’ve failed to create a system that is fair to both the victim and the accused. Reconciliation is not possible until guilt or innocence is established in a system of law that is respected by all parties. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI August 15, 2012 at 11:35 am As principal draftsman of the Title IV 1994 Revision, trying to bring 1917 disciplinary canons into the modern era, I wish to take some exception to your article’s too broad comment that the revision was a “system based on the U.S. Armed Forces code of military justice” [sic]. The 1994 Revision was an attempt to base the update primarily upon the polity and order of an apostolic church with fundamental rights for all the parties involved, including the church as institution. (At the 1994 General Convention, good work was done by Sally Johnson (MN) and others to expand SCCC’s draft more completely to the victims of misconduct.) I fondly recall the late Bp. Walter Dennis’ comment about the priest coming to the bishop’s office for lunch and finding that the priest was the lunch. Only in very, very limited instances, mainly the effect of “command authority”, with a commanding officer (bishop?) having appointing authority and a continuing effect on the officers’ (clergy?) staffing the court through subsequent fitness reports and appointments, etc. (a bishop’s recommendation for a call as rector elsewhere or finding a selected priest “qualified” as rector?) and for some very good, clear and experiential definitions, did SCC look to the UCMJ. Any system of ecclesiastical discipline will always be incomplete, weak and even dangerous when there is no subpoena power or enforceable sanctions for laity bearing false witness and perjury! For those reasons the standard of proof went from “beyond a reasonable doubt” to the lesser standard of “clear and convincing”. (Besides, as to heresy, beyond a reasonable doubt will have to await the final Reunion!) Alas, ECUSA is caught between maintaining good order and discipline and the therapy of reconciliation (think Church of Rome’s current mess). I fear that when clergy are in the tumbril and are facing loss of vocations (remember not just a “job”), livelihoods and very often families, their “rights and protections” are more immediate to them than reconciliation, whatever form it may take. Good luck SCCC!! Catherine Thiemann says: August 16, 2012 at 9:27 am One of the obvious defects of the current Title IV is that it lacks any TIME constraints. Our church has been without our rector since last August. Meanwhile each Sunday we have a diminishing congregation and I fear for the coming fund drive for next year. It is incomprehensible to me that those who drafted Title IV did not recognize the harm to the church caused by the interminable passage of time without resolution. One of the authors cited above called it a “draft”. To my knowledge, most “drafts” do not become canon law. So sad. Rector Hopkinsville, KY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Comments are closed. Robert C. Royce, Esq. says: Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MSlast_img read more

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Boston Marathon bombs rock local Episcopalians

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH A child is comforted after explosions went off at the 117th Boston Marathon in Boston, Massachusetts, April 15. Two explosions hit the Boston Marathon as runners crossed the finish line on Monday, killing at least two people and injuring more than 80 on a day when tens of thousands of people pack the streets to watch one of the world’s best known marathons. Reuters photo/Jessica RinaldiEditors’ note: Story updated April 16 at 9:40 a.m. EST with increased casualty figure.[Episcopal News Service] The seven runners from Trinity Church Copley Square who were competing in the Boston Marathon to raise money for the church’s anti-violence initiative escaped injury in the two explosions that ripped through the race’s finish line that is within 300 yards of the church’s front porch.The Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts announced that it will hold a prayer service with Holy Eucharist at 12:15 p.m. April 16 at the Cathedral Church of St. Paul in Boston, with Bishop Suffragan Gayle Harris presiding, “assuming downtown conditions and transit have regularized.”Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, who is in Okinawa, Japan for the Second Worldwide Anglican Peace Conference, called for prayer following the explosions, and offered the following prayer:Gracious God, you walk with us through the valley of the shadow of death. We pray that the suffering and terrorized be surrounded by the incarnate presence of the crucified and risen one. May every human being be reminded of the precious gift of life you entered to share with us.  May our hearts be pierced with compassion for those who suffer, and for those who have inflicted this violence, for your love is the only healing balm we know. May the dead be received into your enfolding arms, and may your friends show the grieving they are not alone as they walk this vale of tears.  All this we pray in the name of the one who walked the road to Calvary. Amen.The two bombs killed three people and injured more than 150 others in a terrifying scene of broken glass, smoke and severed limbs, authorities said, according to an Associated Press report.The blasts took place almost simultaneously about four hours after the start of the race, and about 100 yards apart, AP said, tearing limbs off numerous people, knocking spectators and at least one runner off their feet, shattering windows and sending smoke rising over the street.A fire broke out at the John F. Kennedy Library a few miles away and more than an hour later, but no injuries were reported, the police commissioner said. It was not clear what caused the fire or whether it was related to the bombings. A senior U.S. intelligence official said two other explosive devices were found near the marathon finish line.“Downtown church personnel reached so far report chaos in the Back Bay area and limited mobility,” the diocese reported at 5:30 p.m. April 15. Emmanuel Church at 15 Newbury Street reports no damage, the report said, and the cathedral had cancelled its Monday evening community meal because volunteer servers couldn’t make it into the city.An hour earlier, Bishop Tom Shaw requested prayers “for the City of Boston and all affected by and responding to this afternoons explosions” and said that diocesan staff were checking in with downtown Episcopal churches.Some Massachusetts churches responded to the tragedy by gathering in prayer.The Rev. Timothy Schenck, rector of St. John the Evangelist Episcopal Church in Hingham, Massachusetts, announced on Facebook that the parish would hold a 7 p.m. prayer service.“All are invited as we pray for the victims of today’s tragedy in Boston and try to make sense of this in the context of our faith,” wrote Schenck, who ran the marathon himself in 2008. “Please spread the word.”Trinity Church in Rockland, Massachusetts, reported on Facebook: “Church is open now if anyone needs to come and pray. Shaken to the core by what just happened in Boston.”House of Deputies Vice President Byron Rushing said on the House of Bishops and Deputies listserv that he did not go to the race’s finish line although it is in one corner of the state legislative district he represents and six blocks from his house. Rushing, the assistant majority leader in the Massachusetts House of Representatives, said he instead attended Patriots Day activities at First Church in nearby Roxbury.The Boston marathon is the world’s oldest annual marathon, having begun in 1897, and is run on Patriots Day, the third Monday in April. The day, which is a legal holiday in the state, commemorates the battles of Lexington and Concord, the first battles of the American Revolutionary War, which took place April 19, 1775.“Hugely relieved” is how the Rev. Patrick C. Ward, Trinity associate rector for worship and communications, described his feelings in a call to Episcopal News Service about 5 p.m. EST April 15, about two hours after the explosions.Ward said he and other parish staff members had spent those two hours trying to track down the seven runners, including Richard Webster, the church’s organist and director of music. Trinity staffers who had gone to the race course to cheer on their colleagues also were unharmed, Ward said.“What [information] I am getting is basically from texts and Facebook because cell service is so awful right now and people aren’t really on e-mail right now. They’re using their phones for texting and updating their status on Facebook,” he said. “I’m just relieved that all of our people are OK.”About 40 marathon participants from elsewhere came to Trinity for its various Sunday services, and they all received a blessing, Ward said.Trinity Church was closed for the day because of the race. When initially contacted about 4:30 p.m., Ward said the staff had closed up the building after the last service the evening before.Ward was continuing to get most of his information from texts and Facebook updates, while watching television reports, as he talked to ENS.“I’m looking at the news; I am looking at an aerial shot right now, and [the explosion site] is about 300 yards from our front [west] porch,” he said.The finish line is on Boylston Street about a half block from Copley Square and right in front of the public library, according to Ward. The infrastructure damage caused by the bomb appeared to be isolated to storefronts at the finish line and to the grandstand, he said.“I don’t think there was any damage to Trinity Church,” Ward added.“People say, ‘Should we go to church,’ but the whole area is completely sealed off,” he said. “There’s nothing we can do there right now.”Team Trinity, as it is known, was competing in the marathon via the John Hancock Boston Marathon Nonprofit Program to support the programs of the Trinity Boston Foundation. The foundation’s mission is to “unlock opportunity and change the odds for the youth of Boston,” according to its website. Ward said there is “a strong anti-violence component to the ongoing work that we do.” John Hancock had predicted that participants in its program would raise nearly $7 million during the race.While the AP reported there was no word on the motive or who may have launched the attack, Ward reflected on the violence by recalling his experience the day before.He said he was coming to church on April 14 amid a number of foot races that take place the day before the marathon and heard the national anthem being played.“It was huge crowds but very peaceful and, having lived through Sept. 11, I thought, ‘Oh, we’re beyond that now,’” he said, adding it was nice to be out on the street in such a big crowd “and not feel afraid.”— The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. ENS correspondent Sharon Sheridan contributed to this story. April 16, 2013 at 7:26 am Thank you for the good reporting. On all who are suffering and on this nation,Kyrie eleison,Christe eleison,Kyrie eleison Boston Marathon Bombing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Katerina Whitley says: By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Apr 15, 2013 April 21, 2013 at 10:59 pm I agree with everything you’ve said, Bernie, but my comment wasn’t about the story itself, which was fine; it was about the headline. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel April 17, 2013 at 2:09 pm Nothing about the headline is offensive. I am a member of the Episcopal Diocese of Massachusetts. Just last year, I visited Trinity Church Copley Square as it is was where our deanery (Charles River) had its confirmation service. It is a well-known and significant congregation located in the vicinity of the marathon route, so it is appropriate to note in the title, how local Episcopalians were affected by this situation. After all, this is the “Episcopal News Service.” Kathleen Dubois says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Tags Rector Washington, DC Titus Presler says: Raleigh Daniel Hairston, D.Min. Rector Retired says: Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group April 16, 2013 at 5:59 pm My heartfelt prayers to out to all affected in any way by the explosion at the Boston Marathon. May the comfort, strength and love of Jesus be with them all, so they can recover from grief, injury to body, mind or spirit.Wanda, a member of St. Stephen’s in the Field, San Jose, California April 20, 2013 at 2:17 am Hi, Joseph, I understand. My view, though, is that I can find those types of news stories in the mainstream outlets. However, ENS offers what the mainstream news outlets don’t: stories that explain how Episcopalians have been affected. Yet, when the mainstream news outlets cover stories about Episcopalians, they often don’t seem grounded in any knowledge of the church as a denomination. April 17, 2013 at 6:46 pm Thanks, Bernie, but I’ll stay with my initial thought. I’m very familiar with Trinity, Copley Square and the location of the bombs, including their proximity to several churches, including the one steeple that shows up in a lot of the pictures, of Old South Church — and I realize ENS is ENS. But for me, the headline seemed to have a “Bomb Rocks Local Episcopalians – Others Affected Too” ring to it. In other words, everyone was ‘rocked’ and I don’t see any reason to single out Episcopalians in the headline. On the other hand, I could surely see a piece entitled, “Trinity, Copley Square Members Respond to Marathon Bombing” or “Episcopalians Respond…” or something like that, which would be terrific. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA April 17, 2013 at 12:07 am May 9, 2013 will mark 42 years ago when I was ordained priest by the late Bishop of Massachusetts, the Rt. Rev. John M. Burgess, in the Trinity Parish Church, Copley Square, Boston. This unfortunate event brought back many memories of my times in that area. I am indeed saddened by these terrorist acts that both killed and wounded many. Many of us are joining with the Rt. Rev. Gayle Harris, Suffragan Bishop, in praying for God’s grace, love, mercy and healing for victims and survivors; and restful peace to those killed, and now into the nearer presence of our heavely Father, and the Lord Jesus Christ. It is only in and through the triune God do we find real, and lasting, peace and safely. Along with seeking justice, new hope and healing, for all let us continue in prayers, and looking forward to the days when violence and wars shall cease, and we shall inherit a new world order headed by the King of Kings and the Lord of Lords. Amen! “Come quickly lord Jesus”! RDH+ Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events April 16, 2013 at 9:50 am Sympathy and prayers from Freeport, Pennsylvania. ” Lord, make us an instrument of your peace. Where there is hatred, let us sow love; where there is injury, pardon;, where there is discord, union; where there is doubt, faith; where there is despair, hope; where there is darkness, light; where there is sadness, joy. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Joseph Lane says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 April 15, 2013 at 9:20 pm I send sympathy and prayer from here in Peshawar. We will lift up the Boston casualties in prayer this morning in the Edwardes College Chapel. As people in this city and province know, these sudden intrusions of horror are deeply disturbing and make life seem tenuous. “O God our help in ages past, our hope for years to come, our shelter from the stormy blast, and our eternal home.” Submit a Press Release Bernie Jones says: Rector Bath, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Joseph Lane says: The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC April 16, 2013 at 12:08 pm Prayers go out to all who were effected by this horrific event. Submit a Job Listing Comments (12) Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Martinsville, VA Joseph Lane says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Diane Pyle says: April 16, 2013 at 2:09 pm The headline on this piece is offensive in its narrowness. Comments are closed. Rector Belleville, IL Rector Collierville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Wanda Bryan says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Boston Marathon bombs rock local Episcopalians Diocese reports no church damage, but ‘chaos’ in area Submit an Event Listing Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Pittsburgh, PA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Joyce White Ralston says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY April 16, 2013 at 11:43 am Dear Katerina, I join you and others to hold up in prayer this strike against our freedom and humanity. So good to see/hear your voice in this public space. God Bless you, too. Diane Bernie Jones says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA last_img read more

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Dominican Republic moving toward self-sustainability by 2016

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Self-Sustainability Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments (1) Submit an Event Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopalians processed from Epiphany Cathedral on Independence Avenue down George Washington Avenue, better known as the “malecón,” to the ministry of culture for the closing Eucharist of the 56 annual Diocese of the Dominican Republic Diocesan Convention. Photo: Julius Ariail[Episcopal News Service – Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic] As the Diocese of the Dominican Republic continues toward self-sustainability, companion relationships and a growing sense of stewardship will remain a key component in the diocese’s plan for further growth and development.“It possible to reach self-sufficiency with the help of companion dioceses and the efforts that we put into local stewardship,” said Dominican Republic Bishop Julio Cesar Holguín.For the church to continue in its mission, he continued, it needs the support of the local churches, schools and other institutions, as well as the support Episcopal Church women, companion diocese and local individuals who support the church in its mission.The 2014 budget passed during the diocese’s Feb. 14-16 annual convention included provisions by which each of the diocese’s 55 missions would take on a larger share of their own operating costs and percentage of clergy salaries paid. The convention’s theme was taken from John 15:16, “We are called to bear lasting fruit.”During his address to the convention, during which Holguín officially called for the election of a coadjutor, he said that the diocese had been working hard to ensure its financial self-sustainability. It has had support, he said, on several fronts:Local congregations, most of which have limited resources, have begun to take responsibility for some of their own costs, stewardship, utilities, maintenance, clergy salaries, Christian education and social programs.Congregations have started entrepreneurial programs.The diocese’s schools, conference centers and institutions continue to grow in their own administrative capacities and the services they offer, increasing their income and contribution to the diocese and its mission in the country.The Dominican Development Group and the Episcopal Church’s annual subsidy provide continued support.The subsidy, however, will not continue forever and Episcopal Church’s Province IX dioceses spread across the Caribbean and Central and northern South America have begun to implement strategies for financial independence from the Episcopal Church’s historic block grant program, which in the current triennium allocates $2.9 million for Province IX.Dominican Republic Bishop Julio Cesar Holguín officially called for a bishop coadjutor during the Feb. 14-16 Diocesan Convention. Photo: Julius AriailRecently, on the recommendation of the Second Mark of Mission working group, a group convened by the staff of the Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society, the Episcopal Church’s Executive Council during its Feb. 5-7 meeting in Maryland agreed to an 18-year plan for “self-sufficiency,” in support of sustainable mission and ministry in Province IX, which includes the Dominican Republic.“This is coming out of a need for Province IX that the leaders of those dioceses came to themselves,” said Sam McDonald, deputy chief operating officer and director of mission for the Episcopal Church.“We are trying to move into a spiritually healthier relationship built on mutuality and not dependency.”Beginning with the three dioceses closest to achieving self-sufficiency – the Dominican Republic, Honduras and Colombia – the plan calls for each diocese to receive an infusion of funds based on a strategic plan for self-sustainability. As they become sustainable, they are to commit to working with the province’s other dioceses to help them achieve the same goal.The other four Province IX dioceses are: Ecuador Central, Ecuador Litoral, Venezuela and Puerto Rico. The Diocese of Puerto Rico is self-sustainable. The triennial budget also included an additional $1 million for Province IX with the goal of “strengthening the province for sustainable mission.” This money will be made available to the dioceses to further their progress toward self-sustainability.The next step is for the Dominican Republic and Honduras to submit proposals outlining how the money will be used to promote self-sustainability, said Martha Gardner, chair of Executive Council’s Joint Standing Committee on World Mission, in a Feb. 13 telephone interview with ENS.Companion relationships, said Gardner, will play a major part in helping the dioceses reach self-sufficiency.Strength in numbersDominican Republic Bishop Julio Cesar Holguín ordained four deacons during the closing Eucharist of the 56 annual Diocese of the Dominican Republic Diocesan Convention. Photo: Julius Ariail.The Dominican Republic is a case in point.  Over the past 20 years the number of companion relationships has grown from four to 15; over the past 15 years, the diocese has grown to include more than 11,000 Episcopalians, 55 churches and more than 30 schools and institutions. The diocese has a $1.1 million annual budget.In 1998, the Dominican Development Group was formed with the primary goal of seeking the “human, material and financial resources that are required to maintain the diocese’s rate of growth and to provide the diocese with the ability to maintain ‘quality’ programs.”In 15 years, the DDG has raised more than $10 million to finance the building of infrastructure, including churches, schools, day-care centers and medical clinics, in the Dominican Republic. It is held up as a model of entrepreneurship across Province IX.While “self-sustainability” means that the church in the Dominican Republic eventually will no longer be dependent on the block grant program, the DDG will plan an important role in helping it to sustain the growth underway already, said Bill Kunkle, the group’s executive director.“The goal would be to continue the growth, we wouldn’t want to stagnate,” he said. “That’s where the teams come in in support of the growth, expanding the ministries and partnerships.”As executive director, Kunkle serves as the diocese’s U.S.-based companion-relationship liaison. Along with Karen Carroll, an Episcopal Church missionary who has served in the Dominican Republic for nine years, he helps to coordinate from 50 to 70 mission teams that travel to the Dominican Republic to help build and maintain church properties, run vacation Bible schools and conduct medical and other missions.Mission teams often visit the Dominican Republic annually; what can begin as a “colonial” type relationship in which North Americans want to direct projects and initiatives, over time gives way to solid partnerships in which each party benefits.The Rev. Adolfo Moronta describes the construction progress in San Isidro to Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley and Bill Kunkle, the executive director of the Dominican Development Group. Photo: Julius Ariail.It was the notion of partnership, rather than just sending money to support projects, attracted and has sustained the companion relationship between the Dominican Republic and the Diocese of Eastern Michigan.“We’ve been in ‘colonial relationships’ and this is something different,” said Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley, who attended the diocesan convention.It’s also clear, said Northwest Texas Bishop Scott Mayer, whose diocese also has a companion relationship with the Dominican Republic, that the Episcopal Church’s domestic dioceses could learn a lot from how the diocese plants its missions.“They plant missions where they see a need, we plant churches where we see a growth track,” he said.Diocesan Convention attendees broke into groups for round-table discussions on the Five Marks of Mission. Photo: Julius Ariail.Self sustainability plans take shapeDuring a July 2013 meeting of lay and ordained leaders of Province IX and church center staff, the consensus was that “the current relationship between the dioceses of Province IX and the rest of the Episcopal Church is influenced by the nature of the historical block grants that establish a relationship of dependency. This is not spiritually healthy, either for the ‘dependent’ or the ‘depended upon,’” according to a document that was released following the meeting.The document created by the Mark 2 Mission group was born of a longer conversation that began in earnest in March 2011 with a conference in Tela, Honduras.In March 2012, during a Provincial Synod meeting in the Dominican Republic, the dioceses officially adopted sustainability as a focus. In May 2013, the Global Episcopal Mission Network conference held in Bogotá, Colombia, also focused on self-sustainability.Each diocese is at a different stage in the process. Even though dioceses of Province IX share a common language, some are well established, some new. The province’s newest diocese, Venezuela, for example, has only officially been a diocese of the Episcopal Church since 2006. The Dominican Republic celebrated 100 years as part of the Episcopal Church, and 116 years of existence, in 2013. Colombia celebrates 50 years this year.Bishop Victor Scantlebury has served for two-and-a-half years as the provisional bishop in the Diocese of Central Ecuador, which looks very different from the Dominican Republic.“My job is to rebuild the diocese, and at the same time help them begin building a plan for self-sustainability,” said Scantlebury, adding that his three main areas of focus include helping the church find its identity, retain members and teach stewardship.The 18-year-plan, he said, takes the diocese to 2030.“It would seem like we have a long time, but not for me,” Scantlebury. “I’m working vigorously to make clergy and laity aware of the fact that we are in this process, and that soon the Episcopal Church [block grants] will not be there anymore.”Part of that challenge is, he said, that in Latin America, where the Roman Catholic culture continues to dominate, parishioners typically give an offering to the church during services, but people don’t think of themselves as “stewards,” he said.In the Dominican Republic, the diocese has already begun to take on the role of stewardship, which also leads to a healthier dynamic within the diocese and encourages priests to develop their own strategies for self-sustainability.“We have to be creative and think of what we can do,” said the Rev. Vicente Peña, who, for instance, worked with the government to allow the diocese to use the cultural center free of charge for its Sunday worship service to close convention because the cathedral wasn’t large enough to accommodate the more than 1,500 people in attendance.In its conversations about self-sustainability and the healthier dynamic it would create between the Province IX dioceses and the Episcopal Church, the Mark 2 team acknowledged “the pragmatic reality that there is a potential future of diminishing revenue at a churchwide level to sustain the historical block grants.”And it said, “It may be that this is a providential convergence of the desire and recognition of the spiritual importance of being free of dependency and the very likely reality that current models are not indefinitely sustainable.”— Lynette Wilson is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Comments are closed. Press Release Service Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ February 20, 2014 at 9:28 am What is the church doing in DR to promote the acceptance and fair treatment of the Haitian people? As a missionary to Haiti, I am horrified with the stories that are told of DOminican treatment of Haitian children sold to them in a slave capacity. ANd then, why are we planning this huge catherdral in PaP and have no Anglican/Episcopal church in Ouanaminthe? It seems the North East borders with Haiti area is not on the radar for Dominicans or Haitians. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Dominican Republic moving toward self-sustainability by 2016 Province IX looks toward 18-year plancenter_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Collierville, TN Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Latin America, Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By Lynette WilsonPosted Feb 17, 2014 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Martinsville, VA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC Province IX, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AliceMarie Slaven-Emond says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

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