Bob Weir And Wolf Bros Welcome Kenny Brooks, Debut Songs At Intimate Blue Note Shows [Full Pro-Shot Video]

first_imgOn Monday, Bob Weir and Wolf Bros played a pair of last-minute shows at New York City’s intimate Blue Note Jazz Club, utilizing a few days off in the band’s touring schedule. Weir, Don Was, and Jay Lane announced the surprise shows on Sunday afternoon, giving fans a chance to enter a lottery system with a short window of time. Grateful Dead fans spotted bassist Phil Lesh and his son Grahame (Lesh) in the 200-capacity club, which was full of a very attentive group of attendees due in part to Blue Note’s no cell phone policy.Bob Weir and Wolf Bros opened up their first set with “Dark Star”, ultimately weaving in and out of the tune for the entirety of their early set. The trio then invited up longtime Weir collaborator and RatDog saxophonist Kenny Brooks for a jam on John Coltrane‘s “A Love Supreme” before continuing to weave in and out of “Dark Star”, throwing covers of Little Willie John’s “Fever” and Little Feat’s “Easy To Slip” in the mix.Transitioning back into their three-piece configuration, Wolf Bros dove back into “Dark Star”, which was followed up by “Playing In The Band”, a “Supplication” jam, and a take on Bob Dylan‘s “When I Paint My Masterpiece”. Bob Weir and Wolf Bros invited Kenny Brooks back up for the remainder of their early show as they transitioned back into “Supplication” terriory before finally closing out “Dark Star” and reprising “Playing In The Band” to bring the 75-minute set to a close. The four-piece delivered a lone encore with “Ripple” to send their early show crowd packing.Following a break, Weir, Lane, and Was reemerged to open their late show with “Eternity”, a Weir and Rob Wasserman collaboration that had not been in Weir’s live repertoire for more than a decade until he dusted it off on Wolf Bros inaugural tour in 2018. Kenny Brooks joined the band for an improvisational take on “Bird Song”, before the band hopped back into their three-piece format as they moved forward with Bob Dylan’s “Most Of The Time”, “New Speedway Boogie”, and the Bob Weir and Wolf Bros debut of “Morning Dew”. Brooks reemerged to help the band close out their late show with “Not Fade Away”. Weir, Lane, and Was were still basking  in the energy of their set-closer as the trio took the stage to open up their encore with a reprise of “Not Fade Away”, which was followed up by another Wolf Bros debut, “Oh Boy!”, a song made popular by Buddy Holly in the late 1950s.Watch pro-shot video of both of Bob Weir and Wolf Bros’ Blue Note Jazz Club sets below via Nugs.tv:Bob Weir and Wolf Bros – 3/11/2019 [Pro-Shot Video][Video: nugsnet]Bob Weir and Wolf Bros are currently in the midst of their 20-date late-winter tour that spans through March 30th. Next up for the trio is a two-night run at Red Bank, NJ’s Count Basie Theatre on Wednesday and Thursday, March 13th and 14th.For a full list of the band’s upcoming tour dates and ticketing information, head to Bob Weir’s website.Setlist: Bob Weir and Wolf Bros | Blue Note Jazz Club | New York, NY | 3/11/2019Early Set: Dark Star v1 > A Love Supreme Jam* > Dark Star* > Fever* > Dark Star* > Easy To Slip* > Dark Star, Playing In The Band > Supplication Jam > When I Paint My Masterpiece > Supplication Jam* > Dark Star v2* > Playing In The Band Reprise*Encore: Ripple** – w/ Kenny BrooksLate Set: Eternity > Bird Song*, Most Of The Time, New Speedway Boogie > Morning Dew > Not Fade Away*Encore: Not Fade Away Reprise > Oh Boy!* – w/ Kenny Brookslast_img read more

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Lewandowski on his way to breaking Ronaldo’s record

first_imgNever before had a player scored that many goals for a German club in the Champions League. 53 goals in 44 games of all competitions make him Europe’s current leading striker.Three goals and five assists in both games against Chelsea give proof of his outstanding form.Teammate Leon Goretzka spoke about the “phenomenon Lewandowski” by praising his attitude. “He always told me to stay calm and focused,” Goretzka reported.“After all, we had to deal with a break after the national league. We had only one test game to get on top-level again,” the midfielder added.Goretzka admitted to having been worried, but “Lewa” told him to concentrate on the duel against Chelsea and forget about the unusual circumstances.“You could feel his determination, he carried us all away in every training session,” the German international said.This season’s key to success is to keep in mind that only one game will decide the next round, Lewandowski concluded.****XINHUAShare on: WhatsApp Robert LewandowskiKampala, Uganda | XINHUA |  The bag of Robert Lewandowski was packed in no time before the Pole boarded the plane heading for Portugal’s capital Lisbon this Sunday afternoon.A brief smile went over the face of the 31-year-old Bayern Munich striker as the Bavarians took off to attend the 2019/20 Champions League quarterfinals.Spanish giants Barcelona are waiting for their “tournament opener” in the last-8-round this Friday evening.The striker admitted he couldn’t be happier to finish the season’s last chapter with another successful episode.But Lewandowski wouldn’t be Lewandowski if he did not take steps to hide his true intentions.“We want to show we are one of the world’s best sides, and we are determined to reach the semifinal,” he said, talking about his team’s goals instead of his personal ones. Goal records or the Ballon d’Or is nothing he is thinking about, he insisted.In Bayern’s training camp in Lagos, 300 kilometers away from Lisbon, the forward might nevertheless think about his desire to win the campaign for the first time and break the record of superstar Cristiano Ronaldo.The Portuguese scored 17 goals in 2013/14 in the shirt of Real Madrid, taking the Spaniards all the way to the trophy.Having scored his goals number 12 and 13 in this season’s campaign when Bayern crushed Chelsea 3-1, the attacker is approaching Ronaldo’s all-time best in rapid strides.“He is not only the world’s best striker, but the best performer in general,” Germany’s most capped international Lothar Matthaeus commented.last_img read more

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Fidgett marches Saints to 2013 BCIHL Championship with OT winner

first_imgCinderella, please step aside.There’s a new rags to riches story and it’s staring the Selkirk Saints.Speedster Cody Fidgett scored minutes into the overtime to power the Selkirk Saints to the 2013 BC Intercollegiate Hockey League title with a 3-2 victory over Simon Fraser University Clan Saturday night at the NDCC Arena in Nelson.The victory, allowing Selkirk to clinch the best-of-three Championship series 2-0, completed perhaps the biggest turnaround in BCIHL history as the Saints went from bottom feeder to champion in one season.“No I would never have thought this was possible,” Selkirk captain Jordan Wood said from center ice when asked about the amazing season that saw the Saints go from 5-19 in 2012 to 21-3 in 2013, topping it all off with an impressive 4-0 record in playoffs.“This is just an unbelievable experience and I’m never ever going to forget this that’s for sure.”Fidgett sent the Saints off the bench in bedlam when he sped down the left side into the SFU zone before wristing a shot past Graeme Gordon in the Clan nets. Selkirk, winning Game one of the series Friday 2-0, trailed 1-0 after one frame and 2-1 following 40 minutes.But a late goal in the second by Thomas Hardy coupled with a quick snapshot goal by Wood in the third period swayed the momentum into Selkirk’s favour and the home side never looked back.“That late goal in the second period gave us some momentum,” said Selkirk assistant coach Jamie Friess.“I thought (SFU) came out and took the play to us early . . . of course it doesn’t help when you take five minor penalties so I thought we were lucky to get through that unscathed,” Friess added.Kale Wild and Brenden Silvester scored for SFU.But this night, and season, belonged to every member of the Selkirk Saints.“First of all (head coach) Jeff Dubois has done nothing but a fabulous job along with (athletic director) Kim Verigin to do what was needed to have a proper program at Selkirk,” Friess explained.“And kudos go to Jeff for his hard work recruiting and to Kim to give us the freedom to do that but without the support of the whole Selkirk College faculty, right from the president right on through to management, we wouldn’t have a team right now.”And once that team was assembled in September, everyone got on the same page said Wood, who experienced the lows of last season.“When Jeff came in he brought in a bunch of new players and when everyone showed up we just had one goal and that was to win a championship,” said Wood.“Everyone bought in . . . this is just unbelievable.”last_img read more

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Underground Rodents Have Better Eyes Than Darwin Predicted

first_imgEuropean scientists looked into the eyes of African mole-rats, expecting to find retinas that had deteriorated due to disuse in the underground, lightless environment.  What they found were several surprises that “call for a revision of our current views on the visual system of subterranean mammals,” reports a Max Planck Society press release.    The eyes look smaller on the outside, but that belies their internal complexity.  The scientists “discovered that in contrast to previous assumptions, the eyes of subterranean African mole-rats have a rather well-structured retina with an unusually high proportion of cone photoreceptors,” says the report.  Since cones are the photoreceptors for daylight vision, “their usefulness in the lightless world of mole-rats is puzzling.”  Also puzzling was that 90% of the cones are sensitive to blue light, whereas in most mammals 90% are sensitive to green.  “The density of rods, the photoreceptors for low-light night vision,” furthermore, “is much lower in the mole-rats than in nocturnal surface-dwelling rodents.”  These findings were the opposite of what was expected:The retinae were anatomically well-developed and showed no obvious deficits.  To the contrary, the researchers found an unusually high proportion of 10% cones among the photoreceptors.  Surface-dwelling nocturnal rodents like rat and mouse have only 1 – 3% cones, which is not surprising as cones do not operate in moonlight or starlight.  Even most diurnal mammals have no more than 5 – 20% cones.  Why should the mole-rats, living in constant darkness, invest so highly in the cones that only work in daylight?  The dominant majority of photoreceptors in all nocturnal and most diurnal mammals are the rods, which are used for vision at low light levels (night vision).  Here the mole-rats are less well equipped.  Their rod density is only one quarter of that of, for example, mice.  Why are the mole-rats so sparing with their light-sensitive rods?The press release offers no new hypothesis to explain these observations.  It just admits the assumptions were wrong, and it’s back to the drawing board:In summary, the photoreceptors of African mole-rats show stark deviations from the common mammalian pattern.  But none of these peculiarities fit the concept of a general regression of the retina in adaptation to a lightless living environment.  Evolutionary biology would predict that obsolete structures are removed because they are metabolically too expensive.  Hence these photoreceptor features should be interpreted as specializations for particular visual needs. It’s going to take more work to sort this out, they say.  “At present we know too little about the visual challenges and capabilities of these animals,” they admit.  But one thing they do know: “Certainly, the hypothesis of a general, convergent reduction of the eyes in subterranean mammals is up for re-examination.”So another evolutionary assumption has been falsified by observations.  Nice work.  Since Charlie is taking a stoning as a false prophet, how about giving the intelligent design community a shot at making and testing hypotheses?(Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Missing Links Found: Walking Seal, Teen Tyrannosaur

first_img1.  Natalia Rybczynski, Mary R. Dawson, and Richard H. Tedford, Nature 458, 1021-1024 (23 April 2009) | doi:10.1038/nature07985.2.  Makovichy et al, “A giant ornithomimosaur from the Early Cretaceous of China,” Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Published online before print April 22, 2009, doi: 10.1098/rspb.2009.0236.We need to coin a new law of nature: evolutionary hype is inversely proportional to the empirical data available.  Write in your suggestion for the person whose name should grace this law.  The Darwiniacs went into a frenzy inventing ways to take a few millimeters of bone here, or a slight proportion there, into trinkets to offer their idol, Charles Darwin.    You should know that Creation-Evolution Headlines strives to give each scientist a fair hearing.  Scanning the hyperbole in the headlines, the initial reaction was to think, “Well, it seems the Darwinians may have scored some points.”  Unlike the majority of lay people who lack the time, patience and access to the original papers to investigate the grounds for the claims, we take the time and show you, in their own words, how solid it is.  As you can see, the grand picture looks more like a hologram, full of light and color, but low on substance, or like the shadows of a man’s hand making animal silhouettes projected onto hundred-foot monsters of shadow and light on the walls of a skyscraper.    You saw what they did: assume evolution, observe a fact, and make up a story to fit the fact into the assumption of evolution.  That’s how they always do it.  Nothing about these discoveries jumps up and says, “Charlie was right!”  Even a young-earth creationist paleontologist would have no heartburn over this.  You could take living animals – a skunk, an otter, a beaver and a seal – and arrange them into a phylogenetic tree.  One little detail we found in their own tree was that they used the same shape for Puijila, Potamotherium and an outlier unrelated to them all.  What kind of evolution is that?  The dinosaur fossil storytellers had even less data to connect their scattered bones with the headlines.    As usual, the original papers are full of uncomfortable little details that undermine their story.  The damages are glossed over with highfalutin euphemisms, ad-hoc stories, and promises that it will all become clear someday in the future.  This is how Darwinian science is done.  Hire an artist to do a little visualization for you, give it to the press, and they will be overjoyed to dish it out to the masses as proof that King Charles is still on the throne.  The peasants are revolting because the King’s protectors are so revolting.(Visited 34 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Science news media are abuzz with reports that two missing links have been found.  One is a fossil seal (pinniped) with four legs, the other a smaller presumed ancestor of the famous Tyrannosaurus rex.Seal:  National Geographic News calls it a seal with arms, and features artwork of an otter-like animal doing a kind of dog paddle with webbed fingers on the way to becoming flippers.  The BBC News announced, “Missing link fossil seal walked,” and said “the 23 million-year-old proto-seal would have walked on land and swum in fresh water.”  The discoverers named it Puijila darwini in honor of Charles Darwin, “who wrote with his usual prescience, ‘A strictly terrestrial animal, by occasionally hunting for food in shallow water, then in streams or lakes, might at last be converted into an animal so thoroughly aquatic as to brave the open ocean.’”    Analysis of the paper in Nature revealed several problems with these claims.1  For one, it’s not news.  Another fossil from Europe, Potamotherium, is very similar in body proportions to this one, and no one was claiming that was a missing link to pinnipeds.  Another problem is that the authors’ own phylogeny chart shows this animal as a contemporary with Potamotherium and Enaliarctos, the oldest known pinniped fossils, which already had flippers and the body proportions of modern seals.  In fact, the “more highly derived” pinniped Enaliarctos dates to the Oligocene, the period prior to the Miocene in which Puijila was discovered, “and not long before a significant radiation of other early marine pinnipeds.”  This seems to represent an abrupt appearance of fully-flippered pinnipeds alongside if not before the appearance of Puijila.  If anything, Puijila represents an extinct sister lineage of extant seals.  “Puijila itself appears to be a relict stem pinniped,” the authors stated in the paper.  A third problem is that these sister fossils are found from different parts of the world.  Puijila was found in the Arctic near Greenland, Potamotherium in Europe, and Enaliarctos on the northwest shores of North America.  It seems implausible these contemporaneous creatures migrated to such distant parts of the world on their evolutionary path.  Finally, other mammals were found in the lake bed habitat: a rabbit, a shrew, an artiodactyl and a rhinoceros.  None of them seemed to be evolving into swimmers to adapt to the aquatic habitat.    The discoverers of a new fossil often have a difficult time classifying it.  That was the case here: “Taken together,” they said after describing the bones, “the dental, cranial and postcranial characters of Puijila suggest that a phylogenetic analysis including Amphicticeps shackelfordi, Potamotherium valletoni and Enaliarctos would be appropriate.”  This is usually followed by some tweaking and fitting of the animal into a phylogenetic tree.  They chose to run a parsimony analysis using PAUP software (Phylogenetic Analysis Using Parsimony), version 4.10b.  It gave them a cladogram based on the eight most “parsimonious” trees.  The software also avoided an undesirable processing artifact called “long branch attraction” that often doesn’t yield the desired evolutionary relationships – suggesting that a fair amount of subjectivity entered into the conclusions; after all, nature may not be so parsimonious at times.  Even then, the resulting tree did not suggest any kind of ancestral relationship between the three stem lineages, one of which was already a “more highly derived” pinniped from earlier in the fossil record.    It seems the authors got a little carried away with the missing-link interpretation in an effort to patch up an embarrassing gap.  “With Enaliarctos considered the earliest pinniped, there exists a major transformational gap between a terrestrial ancestor and the appearance of flippered pinnipeds,” they admitted in the introduction.  “Indeed, most studies of pinniped relationships and evolution do not consider the critical first evolutionary stages that ultimately gave rise to this successful group of marine carnivores.”  Enter Puijila, a “small mammalian carnivore,” to the rescue: “Puijila is a morphological intermediate in the land-to-sea transition of pinnipeds and provides new evidence concerning the evolution and biogeography of the earliest pinnipeds.”  Notice they said morphological intermediate, not temporal intermediate.  Sisters do not ancestors make.    Nevertheless, the news media overlooked these problems and hyped the “missing link” angle, aided by the artwork, movies, audio files, Flash multimedia and Powerpoint slides provided by the authors.  National Geographic News announced “Evolution at Work” in the Arctic, the new “hotbed of evolution.”  Andrea Thompson, senior writer for Live Science, was swept off her feet.  She announced, “Walking Seal Called Missing Link in Evolution” and quoted the senior author saying, “This discovery supports the hypothesis that the Arctic may have been a geographic center in pinniped evolution.”  Like the authors of the paper in Nature, Thompson decorated her triumphant article with the imprimatur of Darwin (see quote above), suggesting his prediction has now been vindicated.Tyrannosaur:  The news media are also celebrating a missing link of T. rex.  The BBC News announced, “Ancestor of T rex found in China” and used the suggestive evolutionary catch-phrase “missing link.”  Similarly, Live Science said the new fossil “Fills Evolutionary Gap.”  What was found?    The original paper was published in the Proceedings B of the Royal Society.2  Makovichy et al named their new ornithomimosaur Beishanlong grandis.  Initially, it might seem odd that the ancestor of a North American giant was vacationing in China, but the authors noted that strange evolutionary things were going on there and then.  The five-foot-tall creature that is said to have lived 125 million years ago “provides evidence for the parallel evolution of gigantism in separate lineages of beaked and possibly herbivorous coelurosaurs within a short time span in Central Asia.  Clearly, size matters, and China was the place to be if you wanted to evolve or perish.    The skeleton was not complete.  No head was found.  Only a scapula and parts of the legs and arms from two individuals were available for study.  It appears one of them was a juvenile, since growth rings show it was still growing when it died.    The usual forcing and fitting into an evolutionary tree was conducted.  These authors relied on a “strict consensus of the results of a larger analysis of 293 characters in 72 theropod taxa conducted with the program TNT.”  The new fossil has many similarities to another named Harpymimus.  Since no one can observe the lifestyle of extinct creatures, nor the morphological developmental changes during their growth (think of flatfish), nor the range of variation within species, there is inherent subjectivity in their classification from fossils alone.  To see this subjectivity in the original language, consider this paragraph (focus on the reasoning, not the technical terms):Beishanlong and Harpymimus are very similar throughout the preserved skeletal parts common to both, although many of these traits are plesiomorphic [i.e., prior to the last common ancestor].  Both retain ginglymous distal articulations on metacarpal I (inferred from phalanx I-1 in Beishanlong), a deep ligament pit on metacarpal III and a strongly curved pollex claw, but straighter claws on other digits.  Both taxa possess a subarctometatarsal foot with the diaphysis of metatarsal III pinched dorsally and exhibits a wedge-like exposure on the ankle, although this condition persists in Garudimimus (Kobayashi 2005) and the feet of Pelecanimimus and Shenzhousaurus are unknown.  Of considerable interest in this regard is the keeled condition of two of the caudal vertebrae of Beishanlong and the near-keeled condition of caudal vertebrae in a juvenile ornithomimosaur specimen possibly referable to Harpymimus (Y. Kobayashi 2002, unpublished data).  In the latter specimen (IGM 100/960910KD), the preserved caudals bear relatively taller neural spines and transverse processes compared with the mid-caudals of Beishanlong, so it is possible that the lack of haemal groove may be related to their position in the caudal series rather than representing a taxonomic difference.  Although mid-caudal vertebrae of Garudimimus are unknown, those of other ornithomimosaurs do not exhibit a ventral midline keel or keel-like anatomy, so this trait could represent a possible synapomorphy [i.e., trait present in the last common ancestor] uniting Beishanlong and Harpymimus as sister taxa.(Read this Cladistics reference article about the terms and decisions paleontologists make.)  It is evident that the skeleton does not jump out and announce its ancestry.  Presumably other researchers, with other software and other outgroups and other lists of taxa to include, could arrive at different conclusions.  This team chose to emphasize the differences between the new fossil and the older one – though they mentioned that theirs was from an actively growing subadult, and the other was from a mature individual.  And lest anyone believe evolutionary trends are straightforwardly apparent in the fossil record, they examined various lines of evidence that “suggest that this lineage did not follow a directional trend of body-size evolution such as has recently been shown for some paravian lineages.”  In biology, real data are messy.  One other surprise was noted: “It is remarkable that such body-size shifts in three different coelurosaurian lineages are so tightly clustered geographically and stratigraphically.”  Was something else going on?    And where did the tyrannosaur missing link idea come from?  The authors did not draw that conclusion in their paper.  In fact, they said, “The holotype of Beishanlong co-occurs with therizinosauroids, hadrosauroids, turtles and tyrannosauroids in the lower mesic faces of Xinminpu Group…, and a strong and remarkably invariant degree of faunal association between these particular clades persists in mesic environments throughout the Cretaceous….”  Here again, if tyrannosauroids were living alongside this creature, it seems unwarranted for the BBC News and Live Science to call Beishanlong an ancestor to T. rex.  Linguists might note with interest that the suffix “-long” in Chinese means “dragon.”last_img read more

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Zuma on South Africa’s growing influence

first_img11 July 2011Mahlamba Ndlopfu, the official residence of South Africa’s head of state in Pretoria, is on a secluded hillside covered with Jacaranda trees. There was little tranquility, however, in Jacob Zuma’s path to the presidency. In the long struggle against apartheid, he was an underground member of the military wing of the African National Congress and spent 10 years in prison on Robben Island. Before arriving at Mahlamba Ndlopfu in 2009, Zuma, sixty-nine, known as a populist who can get a crowd going, won a divisive internal battle with then president Thabo Mbeki and also fended off corruption charges. With Zuma at the helm, South Africa has played a growing role in global affairs even as it continues to struggle with poverty and inequality after the white-rule era. The country hosted the 2010 Fifa World Cup with great success. South Africa has a prominent voice as a non-permanent member of the United National Security Council. Zuma has sought to play a more influential part in African affairs, as illustrated by his mediation in the Libyan crisis; he has been sharply critical of Nato’s military intervention and the indictment of Muammar Gaddafi by the International Criminal Court. But perhaps the most notable development is South Africa’s admission into BRICS – Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa; Zuma sees the grouping of nations as the sharp end of the spear defending the interests of the developing world. Cairo Review Managing Editor Scott MacLeod interviewed Zuma at Mahlamba Ndlopfu on 26 May 2011. CAIRO REVIEW: South Africa has come a long way. How does it feel to be president today? PRESIDENT ZUMA: It feels a great responsibility. That is what is always a bigger challenge. Being a president of this county at this time, it imposes a very huge responsibility to ensure that South Africa moves forward, that if we are given this honor to be president at one time, you must help South Africa to move forward, to leave it better than what it was. That is quite a huge responsibility. CAIRO REVIEW: How did South Africa’s involvement in BRICS come about? PRESIDENT ZUMA: It came about partly because of the changing landscape of the globe. As you know, the emerging economies, the developing countries, have become quite powerful and have tried also to organize themselves. South Africa – besides BRICS, we are also in IBSA [the India-Brazil-South Africa Dialogue Forum], we are also playing our role in the continent, as well as in the United Nations. You know that we have also been part of the group of countries that began to attend the G-8 [Group of Eight] for a number of years before the coming into being of the G-20 [Group of Twenty], of which we are now a member. The changing world. The feeling of more interaction with South-South kind of countries. There is a Group of 77. [Among] the countries that are sort of emerging economies, you could begin to look to those as kind of leading, if you take China, India, Brazil, Russia also has emerged, and South Africa, and the continent of Africa. A discussion began to say, look, if there is BRIC, why can’t South Africa be there? Therefore the discussion began between South Africa and members of BRIC. But what was also important from our point of view was, with the changing world, if we have a grouping like BRIC without Africa, it is not fully represented, and therefore there is a need for South Africa to become a member in a sense that would also make Africa be represented and complete the jigsaw puzzle. After some discussions, everybody realized the need. If today in the world you are part of the globe, you cannot be disconnected from the African continent, which is currently one of the regions of the world which is fast growing. Of course if you are in Africa, you then look at the most economically developed country, and South Africa in a sense fits very well into that. It was after discussions, and of course there was an agreement and finally South Africa was accepted as a member of BRICS, which I think adds value to BRICS itself. South Africa becomes an important entry point to the continent of Africa. CAIRO REVIEW: What is the purpose of BRICS, and what is South Africa’s national interest in being a member? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Firstly, BRICS is important because as you know [in the] changing world there are issues that have been raised globally. For an example, the need to increase the representation of the developing countries in the leading institutions—financial institutions, for an example, whether you talk about World Bank or IMF [International Monetary Fund]. Of course, the UN has been there before. There is a lot of talk about the Security Council itself. That means the old world has a very organized collective voice which in the majority of cases is in defense of their own positions. They wouldn’t want to open up for a long time. And these emerging economies began to be the sharper point of the voice of the developing countries. And therefore BRICS becomes the really cutting edge of that voice. Once you are in BRICS, you are in fact seeing an alternative voice in terms of the global issues. Today, nobody could ignore the BRICS members in terms of the affairs of the world. For an example, almost all the BRICS members are part of the G-20. That tells you therefore the importance in terms of the global balance; [it is] very important that this particular grouping becomes very strong. Back to the interests of the nation: this is very important for South Africa because these are big economies which are growing. They are not shrinking like the old world, which today is not growing very fast. Therefore for South Africa to be part of BRICS means we have an opportunity to participate almost at the equal level with these big economies, which means our companies, our businesses – we have better kinds of agreements that take into account we belong to the same grouping. And therefore the opportunities are more open, and that will translate to developments within the national situation. South African companies will have access to the economies of these countries. That is an advantage we have at the national level. CAIRO REVIEW: Should BRICS form a common vision and agenda? PRESIDENT ZUMA: That would be one of the logical things. I think it is important that because we share common values, that’s the reason we are together. We also come from the developing countries with almost a similar kind of position in relation to the developed world. We share a lot of views together. I think even if it is not on every issue but on some of the major issues, we will certainly come together. It also gives us an opportunity to be able to exchange views among ourselves on the issues that affect the globe today. Bear in mind, BRICS represents almost half of the global population. Therefore you are talking about whether you are looking in terms of the population, in terms of the market, in terms of the economy itself; you are talking about a big kind of thing, which have similar kinds of similar relationships and similar backgrounds. I think therefore on a number of other issues we will certainly come together and have one voice and agree on certain issues that affect the developing countries, for an example. It doesn’t mean that on every other issue, because of course whilst we are a grouping, we are countries that are different. But I think we’ll certainly be gravitating to forming a common view on a number of global issues. CAIRO REVIEW: Is there a conscious effort among BRICS nations to stay in touch on a “BRICS position”? PRESIDENT ZUMA: We are meeting and discussing a number of issues – our relations, etc. We have not necessarily developed the fact that, let us caucus on every other issue. But there are issues that we talk about. For an example, in the last meeting, which by the way was [South Africa’s] first meeting, we talked about the problems in the Arab world, particularly in Libya. We talked about the UN resolutions which were taken by the Security Council, and we share the same common views about those kinds of issues. So I wouldn’t say we have established that as a kind of routine thing, but I am certain that with time, the issues will determine how we actually act on those kinds of issues. CAIRO REVIEW: Will the issues tend to be more economic than political? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I think all the issues. You cannot separate economics from politics. CAIRO REVIEW: Critics ask how you reconcile shared economic interests with the contrast in other values, like human rights: South Africa is a champion of human rights, while China has a deficit. PRESIDENT ZUMA: No, I don’t think that is a problem really. It can’t be. It can’t be a problem when South Africa is part of that space. It can’t be. You will agree with me that one [country], which has been described as a leading economy of the world, and a leading democracy, the United States of America, has very close relations economically with China. That issue has not arisen. I don’t think that issue really arises. China is today one of the biggest economies, and it links with a number of other countries. If anything, I think that as it happens in the world, we will always influence one another on values and human rights. We stand on our human rights. We have a good record on that and believe in it, very much so. But it has not become an obstacle. As I say, other big countries who believe as we do have a very close relationship with China. CAIRO REVIEW: Have BRICS countries caucused on the election of a new IMF chief? PRESIDENT ZUMA: We have not caucused yet. I am in the process of trying to talk to my colleagues about that issue because I think it is an important issue, given the change I talked about. I’m in the process of trying to talk to my colleagues. CAIRO REVIEW: One of your ministers [Trevor Manuel, who is also a former finance minister] has been mentioned as a possible candidate for that position. PRESIDENT ZUMA: That is something we’d certainly like to see. It is consistent with our view that we need transformation. We need the developing world to be at the decision-making levels. I think the time has come. CAIRO REVIEW: In the need for global governance reform, how far should it go? What really needs to be done? PRESIDENT ZUMA: The global system at the moment is lopsided. Global governing institutions were established back in the 1940s, when the world, in terms of countries, was totally different. Even the number of members of the United Nations was different. It was at the end of the World War, the world was entering the Cold War, which has been there for a long time. The Cold War has ended, many countries are there. There are issues that should be taken into account – that some of the rules and regulations that were then laid down, other counties were not there. Therefore, given the change that has taken place in the world, you need the representation to be different. You cannot have, for example, some other regions of the world who are not represented at the decision-making; it doesn’t make good sense. Decisions that are taken affect everybody else. If we take the United Nations, we see no reason why the Security Council should remain the preserve of the few in terms of the permanent membership. People say, “We all believe in democracy”. You can’t be the champion of democracy but at the same time be so conservative in practice. It doesn’t make good sense. You can’t say all others should be democratic, but we have some preserve that you must not touch. It doesn’t make good sense. We believe that the Security Council should be opened up. In other words, regions of the world should be represented in the same way. You have one region that dominates, the European region. Why that should be the case? It doesn’t make good sense. These are the kind of views we are putting across. As well as financial institutions. Many of the financial decisions that are taken affect the globe, and some regions are developing, and many of these decisions affect these regions. Why can’t they be part of the decision-making? That is most important. CAIRO REVIEW: How hard will you push for that? What kind of resistance are you meeting from the Western countries? PRESIDENT ZUMA: We have been pushing very hard, very hard. There was great resistance at the beginning. I think at the moment there is the beginning of appreciating our point. They are beginning to talk about some quotas – that yes, some opening should be made in some institutions. Even in the Security Council the debate is very strong. The very fact that today we have non-permanent members coming in is in itself an appreciation of what we are talking about. We say that we should really complete everything. So we will push hard because we think if we live in the globe, that everything should be fair, that there should be equality, that democracy should be the system, then that must be practiced. We couldn’t just talk about it and then not practice it where it must be practiced. CAIRO REVIEW: Can you talk about South Africa’s relationship with China? How deep is that going to go? PRESIDENT ZUMA: It will go very deep. We have established very good relations with China. We have signed an important comprehensive agreement with China which opens up the kind of economic relations between the two countries. And we have historical ties with them. We are working very, very hard to ensure that we take advantage of Chinese markets. They also take advantage of our market, which includes the continent. So we would want them to go even deeper. There is nothing strange about it. Because all countries who have had an opportunity to do so have done so. The economic relation between China and the United States of America is very deep and very huge. So there is nothing out of the ordinary in what we are doing. CAIRO REVIEW: Are you concerned that China, as a very big country with a high demand for natural resources and scouring the world for markets, could overwhelm a member of BRICS that does not have such economic clout? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Not at all. We don’t have that problem. If anything, we think [in] the relationship with China we take advantage of this market to satisfy our own needs. It should also be looked at from that point of view: that our coming closer to China helps to address our own problems. It is not a one [way] street kind of relationship. We have had relations with big countries, as big as the United States. There was no complaint that they were swamping our economy. Not at all. I think it is a similar kind of thing. Relations are open between countries. Countries know their own limitations. But they also know their needs, as we do. As we go to this interaction, we have that in mind. And we of course have an experience that we have had relationships with other big countries in the past. It is not as if it is the first time we go to a relationship of this nature. CAIRO REVIEW: As you say, another big country is the United States. How does South Africa see the US role in the world today? Friend? Foe? Constructive? Or not? With respect to the developing world, Africa, South Africa? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I wouldn’t want to describe the United States like answering a question, “Is it an enemy or a friend?” We have had very friendly relations with the United States, and it has been a view in the continent here that the United States could have done even more than it has done up until now. But I think that relations have been growing positively, and I think we are very close with President Obama. I think Obama’s understanding of the challenges of the African continent is very positive. He has in fact increased the interaction between the United States and us. We are very happy with it, but there could even be more. And we are working for that, that we have got more very positive relations. So we regard the United States – the United States as you know it is one of the leading countries in the world, and we believe that its emphasis on good relationships and peace and stability in the world is an important role that the United States plays. And of course we believe that role should be played collectively by all counties. I think from our point of view, we have been with the United States on the G-8, G-20, and the interaction has been very useful. We are interacting on any other issues, including global issues like climate change, etc. We believe that time has come that no matter how big the country, the area of collective work, working together, is a thing that we should embrace, more than one dominating others. So at the moment, the United States is not standing wanting to dominate. It wants working together, and we think that is a positive thing. CAIRO REVIEW: What more would you like to see? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Generally. In economic development, in investment, direct foreign investment, we think it could increase. They could do more business with South Africa than they are at the moment. CAIRO REVIEW: Are you satisfied as an African leader that the US plays a constructive role in places like the Middle East, relations with China, global governance? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Generally, I have no quarrel with what the United States is doing at the moment. I think they are playing their role positively. We participate together in these institutions and groupings. It is playing a very positive role. I have absolutely no quarrel. They are ready to participate and help. But I must indicate that it is not just the United States only. The manner in which I think at the moment we are handling the Libyan question, unfortunately, is beginning to introduce a feeling that the AU [African Union] is not regarded seriously by the developed counties. Here is a situation where the AU has the most advanced proposal on the table to bring about peace and stability, [but] there doesn’t seem to be a good connection, so the behavior so far is, people are beginning to see that kind of behavior as not taking the African Union seriously. That’s the only thing I can talk about at the moment. Given the fact that Libya is on the African continent and therefore the AU should really be playing a prominent role. But that does not affect only the United States. It affects all the forces that are combined in terms of how they are looking at the solution in Libya. I hope we are not going to have more of such kind of experiences. CAIRO REVIEW: South Africa, and especially the ANC, have had a long relationship with the Gadhafi regime. How has it felt as an ally of Gadhafi in the past to view the revolution in Libya? On your upcoming mission to Libya, what do you see as a possible outcome? Could that include giving the leader of Libya political asylum in South Africa? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Firstly, the Libyan situation is not a situation that is isolated from what was happening in the Arab world. As you know, Tunisia had a problem, Egypt and other countries, which is borne out of how the governance has been. It came to Libya. So I don’t think we should look at Libya that it just emerged from Libya. There was no such thing. It was a trend. What became different in Libya was the manner in which the Libyan government responded to the issue, which then led to really serious violence – to almost a civil war. We believe as democrats that people have a right to call for a fair system of government. I think the problem that we had in Libya is that they have got a system that is not like any other kind of government system. And the people in Libya said, “No, we now need a kind of different government.” You can’t say the people are wrong. Once the issue is raised, it needed to be attended to, not confronted with violence. That was our difference there. As we have arrived, where people are saying we now need a government which is representative, and in Libya you would understand the situation. Because whatever system that had been introduced in Libya, people have reached a point that they are saying, “We don’t like it, we think we should have a normal kind of system.” You can’t say people are wrong. We never took sides. We always said if people are making a demand, any, any government must listen to its people. Once there was violence, then we had a problem. That’s why we are part of the United Nations resolutions: because we saw the killings that immediately emerged and said you cannot allow it. If people say they want change, listen to them and see what logic they are bringing. Are they asking for change when there is a proper system that satisfies everybody else? Particularly if they have got a very different kind of system that is not practiced anywhere else in the world. You must look at yourself and say there must be something wrong. That did not happen. So our view was that once there was a conflict, let the Libyan people have an opportunity to discuss the matter and solve their problems. We have said – and on this we are together with all AU members – we did not want any military intervention from outside, because it is not going to help us. We remain with that position. The AU taking that position then established the high-level committee to then go and help. That’s the committee that South Africa belongs to, which leads to your second question. I’m going to Libya partly because I belong to that committee, and partly because there has been a view that we need to do extraordinary things to help the situation in Libya. I am going to Libya – this will be for the second time since this [crisis] – went as a collective, I am now going there as a country. As you know, we met with the rebels. We met both sides. Therefore, we have contact with both sides. We have felt that it is necessary to find different ways. So I am going to Libya to also pursue the discussion of saying what solution could be found. CAIRO REVIEW: Do you feel you have a way of persuading Colonel Gadhafi to accept an agreement? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Like anyone, once there is a problem you have to find a way to communicate. I know President Gadhafi very well. We have had a lot of discussion before about matters in the continent. I think it is quite possible that we could discuss and perhaps look at the situation differently, because I am keen to know how he is looking at the situation. We have a view that as the AU we shall be representing: that there must be a ceasefire. We presented this to him, and he accepted it. And that after the ceasefire, there must be a process of negotiations. So that to solve the problem, we stop the killings. It’s important, and we are putting exactly the same point on the rebels. That the fighting is not going to help; we need a solution. The AU must be part of that solution because this is a member of the AU. These are the matters we raise. I cannot foretell what’s going to happen, but knowing him I think we would be able to discuss something that could perhaps help move towards resolving the problem. CAIRO REVIEW: Can you imagine a solution that leaves Gadhafi in power in Libya? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I wouldn’t want to imagine. I think it would not be right for me to imagine whether he should remain or not. That’s a decision of the Libyan people, which would include himself. He is a Libyan himself. I don’t think I’d want to prejudge the situation. CAIRO REVIEW: Seen from Pretoria, can you be optimistic about the future of Africa? You have crises in Libya, Zimbabwe, Congo, Ivory Coast, Sudan, and illiteracy, HIV/Aids. So many problems. PRESIDENT ZUMA: I am very optimistic about Africa. I am very optimistic. I think we have moved from a more difficult situation. We are in a better situation today than what we have been probably fifteen or twenty years ago. We work together more than we did before. I think there are more democratic counties today than there were before. There are more elections in the continent than there were before. We have, for an example, a system that checks how things are going in the continent, a peer review mechanism that has been established, and more countries are joining to become part of it, more countries are being reviewed how they are doing their systems. That thing was not there before. We have dealt with a number of pockets of conflicts in the continent. Today you could count them with one hand and not even finish on one hand, and in the past there were conflicts all over. There is more agreement on the continent today to move forward, democratically and otherwise. We have for an example discouraged the question of coups in Africa. No general in the continent today can think he could wake up and conduct a coup and become a president. That does not work. Those that have made attempts have had to immediately call elections, because this is the stand that Africa has taken. All of that must tell you one must be optimistic about Africa. CAIRO REVIEW: Have you been disappointed that South Africa has not had more influence in the crisis over President Mugabe’s rule in Zimbabwe? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I think to some degree we have never thought it would reach this point. We thought by this time we would have resolved the situation in Zimbabwe. But of course each country has its own dynamics. I think we have made progress in Zimbabwe, progress that has been as a result being a neighbour, of being part of SADC [Southern Africa Development Community], working together. We work with Zimbabweans on a number of issues and we have been making progress. Each time SADC meets, we give a report that marks the progress. It has been difficult, though, because the dynamics there did not allow our interventions in terms of helping facilitate things to move quicker. But yes, we are hopeful that we will resolve the matters in Zimbabwe. CAIRO REVIEW: How does the Arab revolution look from South Africa? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I think the relations will remain normal. I don’t think they will change. What has happened is actually a change in terms of how those people have been governed. I think the protests have been against what they call autocratic government. They want more openness, they want freedom, they want democracy. I think that should be respected. Because people who are governed are people. If they say we want to have a different system of government, they should. Therefore, whatever happened in the changes, South Africa will remain a country with good relations with the counties in the Arab world. I’m hopeful that these protests will really bring about more openness in terms of governance there, that it will help introduce democracy, so that it could have serious regular elections, and with the participation of the people. CAIRO REVIEW: What role can South Africa play in resolving the question of Iran’s nuclear program? You are presently a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council, and your country country was the first to dismantle all of its nuclear weapons. PRESIDENT ZUMA: We have played a role. Firstly, from the point of view of being a member of the United Nations, we have been participating in those debates. But we have also played the role in terms of bilateral [relations], talking to Iran. I think to some degree, not a bigger role than anybody else, to some degree given our experience of nuclear things, as well as our relations, as well as our being a member of the United Nations and a non-permanent member of the Security Council, we think there is a role that we could play. We are not saying it is a decisive one, but there is a role that we can play, we believe. CAIRO REVIEW: President Mandela, President Mbeki, and now President Zuma – how do you distinguish the different presidencies? PRESIDENT ZUMA: [Cairo Review Interview continued: click here] This interview was first published by The Cairo Review of Global Affairslast_img read more

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Brand South Africa partners with the Soul City Institute

first_imgThis year marks 25 years of a democratic South Africa. Since it’s much celebrated liberation in 1994, the country has achieved great strides through social and economic redress, and equally continues to grapple with the consequences of its past – racism, poverty, discrimination and inequality. Despite its challenges, South Africa has been able to punch above its weight to redress and rebuild the nation with a world renowned Constitution, at its core, Freedom and Socio- Economic Rights.As the country heads to its sixth democratic elections on 8 May, this provides a period of reflection and introspection. Have we achieved our collective goals, are we ensuring that no man, woman, youth or child is left behind? Are the values enshrined in the Bill of Rights being upheld for the benefit of all South African citizens and all who live in it?According to the Soul City Institute, women make up 52% of the country’s population, and majority of registered voters at 55%, yet the representation of young women in leadership positions ranging from government, business or civil society still falls short when compared to their male counterparts.Brand South Africa in support of its civil society partner organisation, The Soul City Institute, is embarking on a nationwide campaign to stimulate dialogue around the rights and representation of women in the country . The campaign seeks to engage young women to use their vote wisely in the upcoming national elections; to promote substantive gender equality and to fight against gender-based violence. Brand South Africa continuously encourages all South Africans to play their part in creating safe spaces for women and girls as an essential component of economic growth strategies and to tackle social norms that reinforce and condone inequalities between women and men.The campaign launched on 8 March 2019 and will extend throughout April. You can follow and join the discussion on social media: Twitter: @SoulCity_SA and catch the Facebook Chats: @SoulCitySA.Learn more about the Soul City Institute and its various programmes here: www.soulcity.org.zalast_img read more

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Manipur government gets tougher against agitations opposing Citizenship Bill

first_imgThe Manipur government has firmed up its stand against the agitations opposing the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill. The entire Northeast region is experiencing various forms of agitations against the Bill. Manipur Chief Secretary J. Suresh Babu issued an order on Monday instructing all government offices and educational institutes to open during the 18-hour general strike called by some organisations in the NE region from Monday midnight.However, Manipur’s Education Minister T. Radheshyam said on Monday that the Bill has no clause to hurt the interest of Manipur.Talking to reporters on the sidelines of a function in Imphal on Monday, the Minister said that some Opposition parties had misled the people with disinformation. If it is pointed out that there are clauses against the people, the government is ready for talks.However, it is in contrast to what the Chief Minister N. Biren has been saying. He has been saying that a clause would be added to the Bill to protect the interest of Manipur. Congress Legislative Party (CLP) leader Okram Ibobi questioned it pointing out that the Bill passed by the Lok Sabha cannot be altered in any manner at the behest of the Manipur Chief Minister. Women activists demanded immediate actions since the Bill in the present form may be passed any day.Some weeks ago Mr. Biren made a surprise visit to the Secretariat and ordered deduction of one day’s salary as over 250 employees were absent during a general strike.Frustrated employees said that when there is no proper public transport system and all roads are unsafe as activists are present everywhere the government employees and students cannot attend office. One employee said that in the past, employees were allowed to sleep in the office premises during strikes and they were provided free meals. But for unexplained reasons this facility was denied.last_img read more

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Grateful Manuel vows not to disappoint Ginebra fans

first_imgMOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Racela sees a lot of potential in surprise TNT pick Tallo John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa LATEST STORIES Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Jett Manuel was picked 12th by Ginebra in the 2017 PBA Rookie Draft. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/ INQUIRER.netJett Manuel’s 2017 couldn’t get any better.After passing the Board Exams for engineers and suiting up for Chooks-to-Go Pilipinas in the 2017 Fiba Asia Champions Cup, the blessings continue to pour in for the University of the Philippines standout as Barangay Ginebra picked him 12th in the first round of the 2017 PBA Rookie Draft.ADVERTISEMENT Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101center_img Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Read Next CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA PNP vows dismissal for cadets in alleged hazing at PNPA PLAY LIST 01:37PNP vows dismissal for cadets in alleged hazing at PNPA00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion “Being part of the most storied franchise in the league is a huge blessing. Joining any team has its own pressure, but its magnified in Ginebra because of the fanbase and the history of the team. As I approach everything else, I take it as a challenge. As a player, I’m just excited to live up to the expectations that comes with it,” he said.More than anything, what excites the 6-foot-2 guard is the chance to learn from two of the brightest basketball minds in the country today in coach Tim Cone and starting point guard LA Tenorio.“Coach Tim Cone is one of the best basketball minds in the country. I’m just excited to learn under him because I’m still a student of the game. I just want to learn, learn, and learn, and who better to learn from than coach Tim?” he said.“I’m also really excited to play with LA. I have a goal which is to be a combo guard, and who better that from than one of the best in this generation to play in that position.”ADVERTISEMENT With the Gin Kings faithful cheering his name as he stepped to the stage, Manuel couldn’t stop himself from smiling as he looked back on the amazing year that was.“I’m just thankful for this opportunity that they are giving me and I promise that I won’t disappoint them,” he said.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutManuel, however, knows that being drafted is one thing and staying in the league is another.And this early, he is looking forward to showing his wares and proving himself as he joins the back-to-back Governors’ Cup champions. View commentslast_img read more

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Cristiano Ronaldo’s Portugal wins 1st Nations League title

first_imgLATEST STORIES Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess “It’s a great achievement, indisputable,” Portugal coach Fernando Santos said. “These victories will be part of Portuguese soccer forever.”Ronaldo, coming off a hat trick in the semifinals, lifted the winners’ trophy but wasn’t much of a factor in Sunday’s final, with the only goal coming from midfielder Gonçalo Guedes early in the second half at the Estádio do Dragão.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“Things have been going well for Portugal in recent years,” Ronaldo said. “The national team has won some important titles.”The hosts’ victory in UEFA’s newest competition, created to give national teams more meaningful matches than just friendlies, denied the Netherlands its first trophy since the 1988 European Championship. The revamped Dutch team was seeking some redemption after failing to qualify for the 2018 World Cup and the 2016 European Championship. Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Portugal players celebrate with their trophy after defeating the Netherlands 1-0 in the UEFA Nations League final soccer match at the Dragao stadium in Porto, Portugal, Sunday, June 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)PORTO, Portugal — Three years after conquering European soccer for the first time, Portugal and Cristiano Ronaldo are celebrating another international title.Portugal won the inaugural UEFA Nations League tournament on Sunday, beating the Netherlands 1-0 to lift its first trophy since the 2016 European Championship.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew NBA free agency could make Raptors, Warriors both losers Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. After the match, the Portuguese squad went to a public plaza in Porto where several thousand fans celebrated the win. Santos, Ronaldo and other players addressed the fans from a balcony.“We couldn’t have done this without you,” Ronaldo told fans.Ronaldo couldn’t do much against Dutch defender Virgil van Dijk in the matchup of likely contenders for the player of the year award, but Guedes couldn’t be stopped when he hit a powerful right-footed shot from outside the area in the 60th minute.Guedes started the build-up to the goal with a pass to Bernardo Silva, receiving the ball back at the top of the area and firing a firm low shot past Dutch goalkeeper Jasper Cillessen, who touched the ball but couldn’t parry it away.“It was a hard shot,” said Cillessen, who was making his 50th appearance with the Netherlands. “I saw it late.”ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Some of the loudest chants at the stadium came from English fans who likely had expected their national team to reach the final. England ended third after defeating Switzerland 6-5 in a penalty shootout earlier Sunday in Guimaraes.Portugal defender Ruben Dias earned the man of the match award. Ronaldo ended top scorer in the Final Four with three goals, and teammate Silva was named best player. Netherlands midfielder Frenkie de Jong earned the best young player award for the finals.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too The Dutch had impressed in the group stage of the Nations League by eliminating the last two World Cup champions — France and Germany. It made it to the final after beating England 3-1 in the semifinal on Thursday.“At the start of this tournament I don’t think anyone would have believed us if we’d said we’d reach the final,” said Van Dijk, who hadn’t faced Ronaldo since the 2018 Champions League final between Liverpool and Real Madrid. “We’ve made a lot of progress. We have to be very proud of ourselves. Now disappointment is in our heads but we have to keep heads up. It’s been a good season.”Portugal, which eliminated Italy and Poland in the group stage and defeated Switzerland in the semifinals, had lost the 2004 European Championship final at home to Greece, but this time it got to celebrate the title in front of its fans after a scrappy match in Porto.The hosts were in control most of the match but struggled to get past the stout Dutch defense led by Van Dijk and Matthijs de Ligt.Ronaldo’s best chance was a header that went straight to Cillessen’s hands about 30 minutes into the first half.The Dutch improved after halftime but couldn’t create many significant scoring chances, with Memphis Depay coming closest with a 65th-minute header saved by goalkeeper Rui Patricio.The Netherlands kept pressing but Portugal was able to hold on to clinch the first Nations League title.“It was a bit better in the second half, and then the goal was (scored) and it became even more difficult because they are masters in defending when they are ahead,” Netherlands manager Ronald Koeman said. “We were not good enough tonight.”Santos made changes from the team that defeated Switzerland 3-1 in the semifinals, taking out 19-year-old Joao Felix from the starting lineup and adding Guedes to the attack. He also used Danilo in midfield and Jose Fonte to replace the injured Pepe in the middle of the defense.Koeman, a player for the Netherlands at the 1988 European Championship, kept the same squad that defeated England in the semifinals. ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games View commentslast_img read more

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