WellChild to benefit from BBC’s October Lifeline appeal

first_img Tagged with: BBC Individual giving radio TV Children’s charity WellChild has been selected by the BBC to be the beneficiary for its Lifeline appeal this month.The BBC1 programme will air on Sunday 17 October at 16.05 and on BB2 on Tuesday 19 October at 13.45. It features a call for support from WellChild’s Royal Patron Prince Harry and is lead by the charity’s business ambassador and Dragon’s Den panelist Duncan Bannatyne, who has been a supporter of the charity for a number of years as well as personally funding one of WellChild’s nurse posts.WellChild Children’s Nurses provide specialist support to enable children with complex health conditions to leave hospital and to be cared for at home.As part of the programme Bannatyne travels to meet some of the children who have been helped by a WellChild nurse and see how their lives have been improved by having their children at home with them.The next deadline for applications to benefit from BBC Radio 4’s and Lifeline’s appeals is 3 January 2011.www.wellchild.org.uk  27 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis WellChild to benefit from BBC’s October Lifeline appeal Howard Lake | 11 October 2010 | News About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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Delhi HC Issues Notice On Plea Challenging Centre’s Decision To Allow Telecasting Of Sudarshan TV Show Allegedly Communalising UPSC Recruitment Of Muslims [Read Petition]

first_imgTop StoriesDelhi HC Issues Notice On Plea Challenging Centre’s Decision To Allow Telecasting Of Sudarshan TV Show Allegedly Communalising UPSC Recruitment Of Muslims [Read Petition] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK11 Sep 2020 3:12 AMShare This – xDelhi High Court on Friday issued notice on a petition challenging the Order of Ministry of Information and Broadcasting’s allowing the telecast of a show ‘Bindas Bol” which allegedly communalising UPSC recruitment of Muslims.However Justice Navin Chawla has refused to stay the broadcast of the show.In the Petition filed through Advocate Shadan Farasat alleged that the…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginDelhi High Court on Friday issued notice on a petition challenging the Order of  Ministry of Information and Broadcasting’s  allowing the telecast of a show ‘Bindas Bol” which allegedly communalising UPSC recruitment of Muslims.However Justice  Navin Chawla has refused to stay the broadcast of the show.In the Petition filed through Advocate Shadan Farasat alleged that the Centre has refrained from exercising its powers under Sections 19 and 20 of the Cable TV Act to prohibit the Proposed Show. “The Impugned Order 
is a non-speaking order and for the purposes of adjudicating this Petition, only one paragraph of the Impugned Order is relevant which contains the entirety of reasoning and decision”The Petitioners contended that the assessment made by the Ministry has simply been abandoned on a statement of Respondents No. 2 and 3 that there is no violation of the Programme Code. There is no independent application of mind to the facts and circumstances of the case. “Sections 19 and 20 of the Cable TV Act expressly permit the Respondent No.1 to “prohibit” the transmission of a program if the same is found to be in violation of the Programme Code and/or Section 19. The power to prohibit “transmission” has been used separately from the power to prohibit “re- transmission”. If there is a power to prohibit transmission separate from a power to prohibit re-transmission, it falls to reason that the broadcast of a program can be prohibited before it is aired for the first time. In fact, Section 19, by the use of the standard of “likelihood”, makes it even more explicit that the power of prohibition therein can be exercised prior to broadcast. And if broadcast of a program can be prohibited before it is aired, then as a sequitur, the non-airing 
of the program cannot be a ground to not prohibit its airing in exercise of powers under Sections 19 and 20 of the Cable TV Act”On Tuesday Central Government has permitted Sudarshan News TV to telecast its controversial programme titled “Bindass Bol”, which was earlier stayed by the Delhi High Court on a prima facie finding that its promo/ trailer is violative of the Programme Code set out under the Cable Television Networks (Regulation) Act, 1995.As the Ministry of Information and Broadcasting gave a green signal to the news channel, the show, allegedly about ‘Muslim infiltration’ in civil services,The Ministry took note of the channel’s submission that the show does not violate any law and that if at all any of its content is found to be e violative, action as per law may be taken. It thus granted permission with a caution as under:”Having regard to the aforementioned facts and circumstances of the case, Sudarshan TV channel is hereby directed to ensure that the programme proposed to be telecast does not violate any of the programme codes. If any violation of the programme code is found, action as per law will be taken.”On August 28, the Delhi High Court stayed the broadcast of ‘Bindass Bol’ show, after a petitioner submitted that its trailer openly engages in hate speech and defamation against students of Jamia Milia Islamia and the Muslim community.The petitioners had submitted the show claims that the success of Jamia Milia Islamia students in the Civil Services examination 2020 represents a “conspiracy to infiltrate the civil service by Muslims”.Subsequently, the High Court disposed of the petition with a direction to the Central Government, which had already issued notice to the channel, to finally decide on matter within 48 hours of the receipt of the response from the news channel.In its representation before the Ministry, the news channel refuted the attempted pre-censorship. It submitted:”The Ministry has sought clarification about the programme which is planned to be run at a later time. The channel has requested for being informed as to whether there is any practice in the Ministry for seeking explanation prior to the running of a programme. It is further submitted that according to the channel it is its right to telecast a programme and if the said programme is found to be violative of law then action may be taken; however, prior to the running of the programme the script may not be asked for.”It was contended that the Ministry’s Notice was an attempt to do pre-censorship of a TV programme which is unprecedented and violative of the constitutional rights of the TV channel.Click Here To Download Petition[Read Petition]Next Storylast_img read more

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Subway fights case for zero VAT on toasted subs

first_imgA group of Subway franchisees is fighting to have the VAT on toasted sandwiches zero-rated in a case that could have implications for retail bakers and coffee shops across the country.Around 250 Subway franchisees supported a recent appeal at a tax tribunal that toasted Sub sandwiches should be zero-rated for VAT. Subway’s products are currently taxed at the standard rate of VAT (17.5%), because HMRC classes them as hot takeaway food, but this will rise to 20% in January when VAT rates are increased.Subway franchisee Kay Mulligan, who runs a store in Huddersfield, argued that the application of heat was necessary to supply a toasted sandwich, a process which irreversibly altered the composition of the bread. Her intention, she said, was to supply a freshly prepared toasted sandwich, not to supply a heated sub to be consumed hot.The tribunal rejected the claim, but the franchisees plan to appeal to the Upper Tribunal next year. Some VAT cases can go as far as the Court of Appeal and the European Parliament.If the ruling is appealed, it could clarify the position for smaller craft bakery chains in respect of VAT on their toasted sandwiches and products including paninis and savouries, said Dipak Jotangia, partner at Dass Solicitors, which represented Subway at the tribunal.He told BB that retailers, including Quiznos and McDonald’s, were currently paying zero rate VAT on near-identical products and that this gave them an unfair advantage. “In the past, some tribunals have agreed that even products such as sausage rolls and Cornish pasties were correctly zero-rated,” he said. “It’s definitely worth considering the VAT position very carefully on these kinds of products.”In a statement, Subway said: “Subway franchisees feel strongly that the HMRC’s decision is inconsistent with its VAT policies toward other toasted sandwich sellers and shops. The chain believes this uneven tax policy will unfairly impact its pricing and will cause unnecessary hardships for its franchisees during a period of economic weakness. Franchisees in the UK feel strongly that the finding of the tribunal is wrong and will continue to robustly challenge it with further appeals.”last_img read more

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Sanders announces $150,000 financial literacy grant

first_imgSource: Senator Sanders office. BURLINGTON, July 1 Sen. Bernie Sanders called today for a new Financial Product Safety Commission to protect consumers from abusive lenders and also announced a $130,000 federal grant to improve financial literacy for young people in Vermont.Sanders (I-Vt.) was joined at the press conference by Joseph G. Bergeron, president of the Association of Vermont Credit Unions, which will work with local business leaders, educators and volunteers, to teach middle and high school students the importance of financial literacy.“If there is anything that the current financial crisis has taught us it is that we have a responsibility to provide young Vermonters with the tools and the education they need to make sound financial decisions later in life,” Sanders said.  “It is critical that we teach kids how to balance a checkbook, save money, qualify for a mortgage, and understand that if they take out a loan there is no such thing as free and easy money.”  The Obama administration, meanwhile, yesterday sent a detailed proposal to Congress that would establish a Consumer Financial Protection Agency to guard against lending practices like those that contributed to the financial crisis, The Washington Post reported. Sanders is a cosponsor of legislation by Sen. Dick Durbin, the Senate’s No. 2 leader, to create the new consumer commission.“The federal government has a responsibility to protect consumers from unscrupulous, predatory, and deceitful lenders,” Sanders said. “While financial education is important, you should not need a law degree or a Ph.D. to understand the terms of a mortgage or a credit card.”Other proposals by Sanders to reform the financial services industry include a serious investigation into the financial crisis to determine what happened and what we can do to make sure that it never happens again.  He also wants a national usury law to cap credit card interest rates and fees, and he has proposed breaking up big banks like Citigroup, Bank of America, and JP Morgan Chase, and insurance companies like AIG, so taxpayers don’t have to bail them out if they fail again. “If an institution is too big to fail, it is too big to exist,” Sanders said.Another bill by Sanders would make federal regulators use emergency powers to stop speculators on Wall Street from manipulating the price of gasoline, heating oil, and other commodities.  Mounting evidence shows a recent run-up in oil and gas prices has little to do with supply and demand and everything to do with excessive speculation by some of the same Wall Street firms that received the largest taxpayer bail-out in the history of the world. “Reforming Wall Street will not be easy,” Sanders said. “Over the past decade, the banking and insurance industries spent over $5 billion on campaign contributions and lobbying activities. They are spending even more today to prevent Congress from seriously reforming their industries.  It is time that Congress stood up to these big financial interests and for the average American.” last_img read more

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NBA trade rumors: Wizards have inquired about Grizzlies’ Mike Conley, Marc Gasol

first_imgThe #Wizards have inquired about Memphis all-stars PG Mike Conley and C Marc Gasol, I’m hearing.But Charlotte is at the front on Gasol.— Candace Buckner (@CandaceDBuckner) February 7, 2019Washington lost point guard John Wall for 2018-19 earlier this season as he elected to have surgery to remove bone spurs in his left heel. It then found out this week it may have lost him for next season, as well, as he suffered a ruptured Achilles tendon when he slipped and fell in his home.Conley has 1 1/2 years left on his current contract and a player option for the 2020-21 season. If the Wizards were to pick him up, it would theoretically solve their point guard problems. Mike Conley trade rumors: Grizzlies guard doesn’t want to be sent to Jazz; Memphis seeking multiple 1st-round picks Related News As for Gasol, according to the Post’s report, the Hornets are in the lead to acquire him, but that has clearly not stopped Washington from checking in.The Wizards lost center Dwight Howard to a back injury earlier this season, and if he does come back, there are no guarantees he will be 100 percent.Washington is 22-31 on the season, 3 1/2 games behind the Heat for the final playoff spot in the Eastern Conference.center_img NBA trade deadline: Wizards send Otto Porter Jr. to Bulls in exchange for Jabari Parker, Bobby Portis There’s another team in on the two Memphis stars.The Wizards have inquired about trading for Mike Conley or Marc Gasol, according to a report from the Washington Post.last_img read more

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FEU forces KO tiff vs Adamson in PVL

first_imgHow to help the Taal evacuees Sophomore middle blocker Czarina Carandang turned in a breakthrough performance, smashing in 21 points for the Lady Tamaraws, who just became the first team to beat the Lady Falcons this conference.FEU and Adamson will face each other in Game 3 of their best-of-three series on Monday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smog“We are overwhelmed. We planned for this match and I told the players to just follow the instructions and they responded well,” said come backing FEU coach George Pascua.Carandang was a pillar for FEU, scoring her last point on a kill-block against Adamson main girl Christine Joy Soyud for a 13-9 lead in the fifth. Far Eastern University stood its ground against a rampaging Adamson to prevail, 21-25, 27-25, 25-20, 23-25, 15-11, Saturday night and extend their semifinals series in the Premier Volleyball League at FilOil Flying V Centre.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award LATEST STORIES DAY6 is for everybody Few tickets left as La Salle, Ateneo cross paths OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson Mos Burger to open in Manila; teases with a pop-upcenter_img Nueva Ecija warehouse making fake cigarettes raided, 29 Chinese workers nabbed Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson In ‘Jojo Rabbit,’ Comedy and Drama Collide Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ View commentslast_img read more

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The Miller Experiment Is Dead; Long Live the Miller Experiment

first_img(Visited 76 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 The image of Stanley Miller pondering his spark-discharge apparatus is too valuable an icon to toss on the trash heap of history.Dr. Stanley Miller (1930-2007), like Frankenstein, stands proudly, arms akimbo, behind his lightning-bolt flask in a piece on Astrobiology Magazine.  Yes, he got some glycine and other mixed-handed amino acids in his artificial atmosphere, but in the many years since 1953, many in the origin-of-life field have found serious problems with his experimental setup.  When they replicated the experiment with more realistic prebiotic atmospheric gases, including free oxygen, they got nothing.  The field has moved on since then, looking for amino acids in meteors or comets, are imagining metabolic processes emerging in deep-sea vents.  But something about that photo, with the lightning bolt in the flask, sent the imagination of atheists soaring:In 1953, American chemist Stanley Miller had famously electrified a mixture of simple gas and water to simulate lightning and the atmosphere of early Earth. The revolutionary experiment—which yielded a brownish soup of amino acids—offered a simple potential scenario for the origin of life’s building blocks. Miller’s work gave birth to modern research on pre-biotic chemistry and the origins of life.Miller, therefore, electrified more than gases: he electrified the imagination.  It was not a realistic scenario; just a “potential scenario” that sent the world on a quest that has run into obstacles at every turn (e.g., compare 2/15/07 and 1/26/08).Now, to keep the dream alive, Antonino Marco Saitta and colleagues at the Sorbonne in Paris have re-examined Miller’s experiment at the quantum level. This, presumably, will breathe new life into the old icon.  In computer simulations, they got the glycine all right, and discovered something new: that formamide, not formaldehyde, appears to be the precursor molecule (Jeffrey Bada, Miller’s student, is skeptical about this, the article notes).  They also believe that the electric field might be 10 to 20 times stronger on mineral surfaces.  “Nobody has really looked at electric fields on mineral surfaces,” Saitta said. “My feeling is that there’s probably something to explore there.”None of this should matter, though, if the experiment starts with the wrong gases.  Did they make the same error Miller did?  A look at their paper in PNAS shows, that, indeed, they did: “A preliminary test to all simulations reported in the main text was carried out on a system, named M00, based on the original Miller mixture and relative proportions of ammonia, methane, and hydrogen.”  Apparently all 50 runs used reducing conditions with no free oxygen, which would have destroyed the desired “building blocks” (glycine, it should be noted, is the simplest amino acid, with no chirality).  They failed to mention, also, that the “brownish soup” included chemicals that would destroy the amino acids.Any results of the new work, therefore, are only of academic interest, and—like the original Miller experiment—bear no relevance on speculations about the plausibility of life arising under “natural” conditions.  They only illustrate intelligently-designed artificial experiments about organic synthesis under controlled conditions.Sixty-one years now the evolutionists (and NASA, with tax funding), have promoted the Building Blocks of Lie with their Miller icon.  We’ve been crying out like a voice in the wilderness about this phony icon for over a decade (5/02/03).  What will it take to get the liars to fess up?  They know full well that this experiment has nothing to do with life, but they continue milking it of all the propaganda value they can get to promote atheistic materialism.  Debunking the “useful lie” requires some knowledge of organic chemistry many people do not have, but the propagandists know that a picture is worth a thousand words.  That image of lightning-in-a-flask sent young Lee Strobel, as a high school student, down his decades-long detour into atheism (see film The Case for a Creator).  How many others went down that same path to spiritual destruction?The origin of life is arguably the most (or one of the most) astronomical hurdles for evolutionary materialists to leap over by faith, but you wouldn’t know it from NASA’s power of suggestion.  Get educated about this key issue!  Read our online book.  Read Shapiro and Orgel falsifying each other.  Read Meyer’s Signature in the Cell.  Whatever you do, help stop this scientifically-vacuous, emotionally-poisoned propaganda from doing any more damage to impressionable minds.last_img read more

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Zuma on South Africa’s growing influence

first_img11 July 2011Mahlamba Ndlopfu, the official residence of South Africa’s head of state in Pretoria, is on a secluded hillside covered with Jacaranda trees. There was little tranquility, however, in Jacob Zuma’s path to the presidency. In the long struggle against apartheid, he was an underground member of the military wing of the African National Congress and spent 10 years in prison on Robben Island. Before arriving at Mahlamba Ndlopfu in 2009, Zuma, sixty-nine, known as a populist who can get a crowd going, won a divisive internal battle with then president Thabo Mbeki and also fended off corruption charges. With Zuma at the helm, South Africa has played a growing role in global affairs even as it continues to struggle with poverty and inequality after the white-rule era. The country hosted the 2010 Fifa World Cup with great success. South Africa has a prominent voice as a non-permanent member of the United National Security Council. Zuma has sought to play a more influential part in African affairs, as illustrated by his mediation in the Libyan crisis; he has been sharply critical of Nato’s military intervention and the indictment of Muammar Gaddafi by the International Criminal Court. But perhaps the most notable development is South Africa’s admission into BRICS – Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa; Zuma sees the grouping of nations as the sharp end of the spear defending the interests of the developing world. Cairo Review Managing Editor Scott MacLeod interviewed Zuma at Mahlamba Ndlopfu on 26 May 2011. CAIRO REVIEW: South Africa has come a long way. How does it feel to be president today? PRESIDENT ZUMA: It feels a great responsibility. That is what is always a bigger challenge. Being a president of this county at this time, it imposes a very huge responsibility to ensure that South Africa moves forward, that if we are given this honor to be president at one time, you must help South Africa to move forward, to leave it better than what it was. That is quite a huge responsibility. CAIRO REVIEW: How did South Africa’s involvement in BRICS come about? PRESIDENT ZUMA: It came about partly because of the changing landscape of the globe. As you know, the emerging economies, the developing countries, have become quite powerful and have tried also to organize themselves. South Africa – besides BRICS, we are also in IBSA [the India-Brazil-South Africa Dialogue Forum], we are also playing our role in the continent, as well as in the United Nations. You know that we have also been part of the group of countries that began to attend the G-8 [Group of Eight] for a number of years before the coming into being of the G-20 [Group of Twenty], of which we are now a member. The changing world. The feeling of more interaction with South-South kind of countries. There is a Group of 77. [Among] the countries that are sort of emerging economies, you could begin to look to those as kind of leading, if you take China, India, Brazil, Russia also has emerged, and South Africa, and the continent of Africa. A discussion began to say, look, if there is BRIC, why can’t South Africa be there? Therefore the discussion began between South Africa and members of BRIC. But what was also important from our point of view was, with the changing world, if we have a grouping like BRIC without Africa, it is not fully represented, and therefore there is a need for South Africa to become a member in a sense that would also make Africa be represented and complete the jigsaw puzzle. After some discussions, everybody realized the need. If today in the world you are part of the globe, you cannot be disconnected from the African continent, which is currently one of the regions of the world which is fast growing. Of course if you are in Africa, you then look at the most economically developed country, and South Africa in a sense fits very well into that. It was after discussions, and of course there was an agreement and finally South Africa was accepted as a member of BRICS, which I think adds value to BRICS itself. South Africa becomes an important entry point to the continent of Africa. CAIRO REVIEW: What is the purpose of BRICS, and what is South Africa’s national interest in being a member? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Firstly, BRICS is important because as you know [in the] changing world there are issues that have been raised globally. For an example, the need to increase the representation of the developing countries in the leading institutions—financial institutions, for an example, whether you talk about World Bank or IMF [International Monetary Fund]. Of course, the UN has been there before. There is a lot of talk about the Security Council itself. That means the old world has a very organized collective voice which in the majority of cases is in defense of their own positions. They wouldn’t want to open up for a long time. And these emerging economies began to be the sharper point of the voice of the developing countries. And therefore BRICS becomes the really cutting edge of that voice. Once you are in BRICS, you are in fact seeing an alternative voice in terms of the global issues. Today, nobody could ignore the BRICS members in terms of the affairs of the world. For an example, almost all the BRICS members are part of the G-20. That tells you therefore the importance in terms of the global balance; [it is] very important that this particular grouping becomes very strong. Back to the interests of the nation: this is very important for South Africa because these are big economies which are growing. They are not shrinking like the old world, which today is not growing very fast. Therefore for South Africa to be part of BRICS means we have an opportunity to participate almost at the equal level with these big economies, which means our companies, our businesses – we have better kinds of agreements that take into account we belong to the same grouping. And therefore the opportunities are more open, and that will translate to developments within the national situation. South African companies will have access to the economies of these countries. That is an advantage we have at the national level. CAIRO REVIEW: Should BRICS form a common vision and agenda? PRESIDENT ZUMA: That would be one of the logical things. I think it is important that because we share common values, that’s the reason we are together. We also come from the developing countries with almost a similar kind of position in relation to the developed world. We share a lot of views together. I think even if it is not on every issue but on some of the major issues, we will certainly come together. It also gives us an opportunity to be able to exchange views among ourselves on the issues that affect the globe today. Bear in mind, BRICS represents almost half of the global population. Therefore you are talking about whether you are looking in terms of the population, in terms of the market, in terms of the economy itself; you are talking about a big kind of thing, which have similar kinds of similar relationships and similar backgrounds. I think therefore on a number of other issues we will certainly come together and have one voice and agree on certain issues that affect the developing countries, for an example. It doesn’t mean that on every other issue, because of course whilst we are a grouping, we are countries that are different. But I think we’ll certainly be gravitating to forming a common view on a number of global issues. CAIRO REVIEW: Is there a conscious effort among BRICS nations to stay in touch on a “BRICS position”? PRESIDENT ZUMA: We are meeting and discussing a number of issues – our relations, etc. We have not necessarily developed the fact that, let us caucus on every other issue. But there are issues that we talk about. For an example, in the last meeting, which by the way was [South Africa’s] first meeting, we talked about the problems in the Arab world, particularly in Libya. We talked about the UN resolutions which were taken by the Security Council, and we share the same common views about those kinds of issues. So I wouldn’t say we have established that as a kind of routine thing, but I am certain that with time, the issues will determine how we actually act on those kinds of issues. CAIRO REVIEW: Will the issues tend to be more economic than political? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I think all the issues. You cannot separate economics from politics. CAIRO REVIEW: Critics ask how you reconcile shared economic interests with the contrast in other values, like human rights: South Africa is a champion of human rights, while China has a deficit. PRESIDENT ZUMA: No, I don’t think that is a problem really. It can’t be. It can’t be a problem when South Africa is part of that space. It can’t be. You will agree with me that one [country], which has been described as a leading economy of the world, and a leading democracy, the United States of America, has very close relations economically with China. That issue has not arisen. I don’t think that issue really arises. China is today one of the biggest economies, and it links with a number of other countries. If anything, I think that as it happens in the world, we will always influence one another on values and human rights. We stand on our human rights. We have a good record on that and believe in it, very much so. But it has not become an obstacle. As I say, other big countries who believe as we do have a very close relationship with China. CAIRO REVIEW: Have BRICS countries caucused on the election of a new IMF chief? PRESIDENT ZUMA: We have not caucused yet. I am in the process of trying to talk to my colleagues about that issue because I think it is an important issue, given the change I talked about. I’m in the process of trying to talk to my colleagues. CAIRO REVIEW: One of your ministers [Trevor Manuel, who is also a former finance minister] has been mentioned as a possible candidate for that position. PRESIDENT ZUMA: That is something we’d certainly like to see. It is consistent with our view that we need transformation. We need the developing world to be at the decision-making levels. I think the time has come. CAIRO REVIEW: In the need for global governance reform, how far should it go? What really needs to be done? PRESIDENT ZUMA: The global system at the moment is lopsided. Global governing institutions were established back in the 1940s, when the world, in terms of countries, was totally different. Even the number of members of the United Nations was different. It was at the end of the World War, the world was entering the Cold War, which has been there for a long time. The Cold War has ended, many countries are there. There are issues that should be taken into account – that some of the rules and regulations that were then laid down, other counties were not there. Therefore, given the change that has taken place in the world, you need the representation to be different. You cannot have, for example, some other regions of the world who are not represented at the decision-making; it doesn’t make good sense. Decisions that are taken affect everybody else. If we take the United Nations, we see no reason why the Security Council should remain the preserve of the few in terms of the permanent membership. People say, “We all believe in democracy”. You can’t be the champion of democracy but at the same time be so conservative in practice. It doesn’t make good sense. You can’t say all others should be democratic, but we have some preserve that you must not touch. It doesn’t make good sense. We believe that the Security Council should be opened up. In other words, regions of the world should be represented in the same way. You have one region that dominates, the European region. Why that should be the case? It doesn’t make good sense. These are the kind of views we are putting across. As well as financial institutions. Many of the financial decisions that are taken affect the globe, and some regions are developing, and many of these decisions affect these regions. Why can’t they be part of the decision-making? That is most important. CAIRO REVIEW: How hard will you push for that? What kind of resistance are you meeting from the Western countries? PRESIDENT ZUMA: We have been pushing very hard, very hard. There was great resistance at the beginning. I think at the moment there is the beginning of appreciating our point. They are beginning to talk about some quotas – that yes, some opening should be made in some institutions. Even in the Security Council the debate is very strong. The very fact that today we have non-permanent members coming in is in itself an appreciation of what we are talking about. We say that we should really complete everything. So we will push hard because we think if we live in the globe, that everything should be fair, that there should be equality, that democracy should be the system, then that must be practiced. We couldn’t just talk about it and then not practice it where it must be practiced. CAIRO REVIEW: Can you talk about South Africa’s relationship with China? How deep is that going to go? PRESIDENT ZUMA: It will go very deep. We have established very good relations with China. We have signed an important comprehensive agreement with China which opens up the kind of economic relations between the two countries. And we have historical ties with them. We are working very, very hard to ensure that we take advantage of Chinese markets. They also take advantage of our market, which includes the continent. So we would want them to go even deeper. There is nothing strange about it. Because all countries who have had an opportunity to do so have done so. The economic relation between China and the United States of America is very deep and very huge. So there is nothing out of the ordinary in what we are doing. CAIRO REVIEW: Are you concerned that China, as a very big country with a high demand for natural resources and scouring the world for markets, could overwhelm a member of BRICS that does not have such economic clout? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Not at all. We don’t have that problem. If anything, we think [in] the relationship with China we take advantage of this market to satisfy our own needs. It should also be looked at from that point of view: that our coming closer to China helps to address our own problems. It is not a one [way] street kind of relationship. We have had relations with big countries, as big as the United States. There was no complaint that they were swamping our economy. Not at all. I think it is a similar kind of thing. Relations are open between countries. Countries know their own limitations. But they also know their needs, as we do. As we go to this interaction, we have that in mind. And we of course have an experience that we have had relationships with other big countries in the past. It is not as if it is the first time we go to a relationship of this nature. CAIRO REVIEW: As you say, another big country is the United States. How does South Africa see the US role in the world today? Friend? Foe? Constructive? Or not? With respect to the developing world, Africa, South Africa? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I wouldn’t want to describe the United States like answering a question, “Is it an enemy or a friend?” We have had very friendly relations with the United States, and it has been a view in the continent here that the United States could have done even more than it has done up until now. But I think that relations have been growing positively, and I think we are very close with President Obama. I think Obama’s understanding of the challenges of the African continent is very positive. He has in fact increased the interaction between the United States and us. We are very happy with it, but there could even be more. And we are working for that, that we have got more very positive relations. So we regard the United States – the United States as you know it is one of the leading countries in the world, and we believe that its emphasis on good relationships and peace and stability in the world is an important role that the United States plays. And of course we believe that role should be played collectively by all counties. I think from our point of view, we have been with the United States on the G-8, G-20, and the interaction has been very useful. We are interacting on any other issues, including global issues like climate change, etc. We believe that time has come that no matter how big the country, the area of collective work, working together, is a thing that we should embrace, more than one dominating others. So at the moment, the United States is not standing wanting to dominate. It wants working together, and we think that is a positive thing. CAIRO REVIEW: What more would you like to see? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Generally. In economic development, in investment, direct foreign investment, we think it could increase. They could do more business with South Africa than they are at the moment. CAIRO REVIEW: Are you satisfied as an African leader that the US plays a constructive role in places like the Middle East, relations with China, global governance? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Generally, I have no quarrel with what the United States is doing at the moment. I think they are playing their role positively. We participate together in these institutions and groupings. It is playing a very positive role. I have absolutely no quarrel. They are ready to participate and help. But I must indicate that it is not just the United States only. The manner in which I think at the moment we are handling the Libyan question, unfortunately, is beginning to introduce a feeling that the AU [African Union] is not regarded seriously by the developed counties. Here is a situation where the AU has the most advanced proposal on the table to bring about peace and stability, [but] there doesn’t seem to be a good connection, so the behavior so far is, people are beginning to see that kind of behavior as not taking the African Union seriously. That’s the only thing I can talk about at the moment. Given the fact that Libya is on the African continent and therefore the AU should really be playing a prominent role. But that does not affect only the United States. It affects all the forces that are combined in terms of how they are looking at the solution in Libya. I hope we are not going to have more of such kind of experiences. CAIRO REVIEW: South Africa, and especially the ANC, have had a long relationship with the Gadhafi regime. How has it felt as an ally of Gadhafi in the past to view the revolution in Libya? On your upcoming mission to Libya, what do you see as a possible outcome? Could that include giving the leader of Libya political asylum in South Africa? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Firstly, the Libyan situation is not a situation that is isolated from what was happening in the Arab world. As you know, Tunisia had a problem, Egypt and other countries, which is borne out of how the governance has been. It came to Libya. So I don’t think we should look at Libya that it just emerged from Libya. There was no such thing. It was a trend. What became different in Libya was the manner in which the Libyan government responded to the issue, which then led to really serious violence – to almost a civil war. We believe as democrats that people have a right to call for a fair system of government. I think the problem that we had in Libya is that they have got a system that is not like any other kind of government system. And the people in Libya said, “No, we now need a kind of different government.” You can’t say the people are wrong. Once the issue is raised, it needed to be attended to, not confronted with violence. That was our difference there. As we have arrived, where people are saying we now need a government which is representative, and in Libya you would understand the situation. Because whatever system that had been introduced in Libya, people have reached a point that they are saying, “We don’t like it, we think we should have a normal kind of system.” You can’t say people are wrong. We never took sides. We always said if people are making a demand, any, any government must listen to its people. Once there was violence, then we had a problem. That’s why we are part of the United Nations resolutions: because we saw the killings that immediately emerged and said you cannot allow it. If people say they want change, listen to them and see what logic they are bringing. Are they asking for change when there is a proper system that satisfies everybody else? Particularly if they have got a very different kind of system that is not practiced anywhere else in the world. You must look at yourself and say there must be something wrong. That did not happen. So our view was that once there was a conflict, let the Libyan people have an opportunity to discuss the matter and solve their problems. We have said – and on this we are together with all AU members – we did not want any military intervention from outside, because it is not going to help us. We remain with that position. The AU taking that position then established the high-level committee to then go and help. That’s the committee that South Africa belongs to, which leads to your second question. I’m going to Libya partly because I belong to that committee, and partly because there has been a view that we need to do extraordinary things to help the situation in Libya. I am going to Libya – this will be for the second time since this [crisis] – went as a collective, I am now going there as a country. As you know, we met with the rebels. We met both sides. Therefore, we have contact with both sides. We have felt that it is necessary to find different ways. So I am going to Libya to also pursue the discussion of saying what solution could be found. CAIRO REVIEW: Do you feel you have a way of persuading Colonel Gadhafi to accept an agreement? PRESIDENT ZUMA: Like anyone, once there is a problem you have to find a way to communicate. I know President Gadhafi very well. We have had a lot of discussion before about matters in the continent. I think it is quite possible that we could discuss and perhaps look at the situation differently, because I am keen to know how he is looking at the situation. We have a view that as the AU we shall be representing: that there must be a ceasefire. We presented this to him, and he accepted it. And that after the ceasefire, there must be a process of negotiations. So that to solve the problem, we stop the killings. It’s important, and we are putting exactly the same point on the rebels. That the fighting is not going to help; we need a solution. The AU must be part of that solution because this is a member of the AU. These are the matters we raise. I cannot foretell what’s going to happen, but knowing him I think we would be able to discuss something that could perhaps help move towards resolving the problem. CAIRO REVIEW: Can you imagine a solution that leaves Gadhafi in power in Libya? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I wouldn’t want to imagine. I think it would not be right for me to imagine whether he should remain or not. That’s a decision of the Libyan people, which would include himself. He is a Libyan himself. I don’t think I’d want to prejudge the situation. CAIRO REVIEW: Seen from Pretoria, can you be optimistic about the future of Africa? You have crises in Libya, Zimbabwe, Congo, Ivory Coast, Sudan, and illiteracy, HIV/Aids. So many problems. PRESIDENT ZUMA: I am very optimistic about Africa. I am very optimistic. I think we have moved from a more difficult situation. We are in a better situation today than what we have been probably fifteen or twenty years ago. We work together more than we did before. I think there are more democratic counties today than there were before. There are more elections in the continent than there were before. We have, for an example, a system that checks how things are going in the continent, a peer review mechanism that has been established, and more countries are joining to become part of it, more countries are being reviewed how they are doing their systems. That thing was not there before. We have dealt with a number of pockets of conflicts in the continent. Today you could count them with one hand and not even finish on one hand, and in the past there were conflicts all over. There is more agreement on the continent today to move forward, democratically and otherwise. We have for an example discouraged the question of coups in Africa. No general in the continent today can think he could wake up and conduct a coup and become a president. That does not work. Those that have made attempts have had to immediately call elections, because this is the stand that Africa has taken. All of that must tell you one must be optimistic about Africa. CAIRO REVIEW: Have you been disappointed that South Africa has not had more influence in the crisis over President Mugabe’s rule in Zimbabwe? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I think to some degree we have never thought it would reach this point. We thought by this time we would have resolved the situation in Zimbabwe. But of course each country has its own dynamics. I think we have made progress in Zimbabwe, progress that has been as a result being a neighbour, of being part of SADC [Southern Africa Development Community], working together. We work with Zimbabweans on a number of issues and we have been making progress. Each time SADC meets, we give a report that marks the progress. It has been difficult, though, because the dynamics there did not allow our interventions in terms of helping facilitate things to move quicker. But yes, we are hopeful that we will resolve the matters in Zimbabwe. CAIRO REVIEW: How does the Arab revolution look from South Africa? PRESIDENT ZUMA: I think the relations will remain normal. I don’t think they will change. What has happened is actually a change in terms of how those people have been governed. I think the protests have been against what they call autocratic government. They want more openness, they want freedom, they want democracy. I think that should be respected. Because people who are governed are people. If they say we want to have a different system of government, they should. Therefore, whatever happened in the changes, South Africa will remain a country with good relations with the counties in the Arab world. I’m hopeful that these protests will really bring about more openness in terms of governance there, that it will help introduce democracy, so that it could have serious regular elections, and with the participation of the people. CAIRO REVIEW: What role can South Africa play in resolving the question of Iran’s nuclear program? You are presently a non-permanent member of the UN Security Council, and your country country was the first to dismantle all of its nuclear weapons. PRESIDENT ZUMA: We have played a role. Firstly, from the point of view of being a member of the United Nations, we have been participating in those debates. But we have also played the role in terms of bilateral [relations], talking to Iran. I think to some degree, not a bigger role than anybody else, to some degree given our experience of nuclear things, as well as our relations, as well as our being a member of the United Nations and a non-permanent member of the Security Council, we think there is a role that we could play. We are not saying it is a decisive one, but there is a role that we can play, we believe. CAIRO REVIEW: President Mandela, President Mbeki, and now President Zuma – how do you distinguish the different presidencies? PRESIDENT ZUMA: [Cairo Review Interview continued: click here] This interview was first published by The Cairo Review of Global Affairslast_img read more

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Weather outlook for the last week of October

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The second half of September will continue to experience above normal temperatures and close to normal rainfall.Second half of September RISK:Temperatures – Above Normal (+3-5F) – Normal highs are in the 70s and lows in the 50s.Rainfall – Near Normal (0.5-1.5 inches) – Normal is about 0.6 inches per week.Freeze – Below normal – Little if any expected.The NOAA/NWS/Ohio River Forecast Center 16-day rainfall outlook suggests the wettest areas will remain west of Ohio. This trend will continue into October where wet conditions could hamper harvest especially west of Ohio. http://www.erh.noaa.gov/ohrfc/HAS/images/NAEFS16day.pdfOctober is shaping up to be above normal temperatures and near or slightly wetter than normal. Based on historic El Nino events, freeze conditions typically arrive a little later than normal so expect a week maybe two weeks of delay to freeze this fall.October RISK:Temperatures – Above Normal (0-+3F)Rainfall – Near or slightly above normal.Freeze – Below normal – Expect a later than normal freeze. Normally Oct. 10-20 across much of the state.With a significant El Nino expected this fall and winter, everything suggests warmer conditions with below normal precipitation western Ohio and normal precipitation in eastern Ohio.last_img read more

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