Faith-based organizations ‘raise ambition’ on climate emergency after UN summit

first_img TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Faith-based organizations ‘raise ambition’ on climate emergency after UN summit Episcopal, Lutheran churches sign climate statement Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Job Listing On Sept. 24, Presiding Bishop Michael Curry added his signature to a joint statement between The Episcopal Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Lutheran Church of Sweden outlining the churches’ “call to join in the care of creation.” Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service] In April, the world lost a 700-year-old glacier to climate change. Oceans are warming, oxygen levels are declining as ocean acidity rises, and fish are dying. At the same time, sea levels are rising and island nations are poised to disappear.It’s alarming evidence of the climate emergency threatening all of Earth’s inhabitants.On Sept. 24, faith-based organizations held a daylong interfaith event to address that emergency, meeting at The Salvation Army in New York’s midtown Manhattan, a half-mile from United Nations headquarters and a day after world leaders met in a climate summit to discuss plans to meet the objectives laid out in the Paris agreement.“What’s happening all over our city, all over New York right now, really all over the world, people are talking about movement,” said the Rev. Stephanie Spellers, canon to the presiding bishop for evangelism, reconciliation and stewardship of creation in The Episcopal Church, during a noontime Eucharist held at the Episcopal Church Center’s Chapel of Christ the Lord.“You’ve been talking about a movement, many of you, you’ve been stirring movement, you’ve been praying for movement. At least in The Episcopal Church, we also talk a lot about movement. In particular, we’ve been talking about a Jesus movement. We even call ourselves the Episcopal branch of the Jesus movement. And we say that together, we are a community of people who are following Jesus, follow Jesus into loving, liberating and life-giving relationships with God, with each other and with the whole of creation.”The Rev. Stephanie Spellers, canon to the presiding bishop for evangelism, reconciliation and stewardship of creation in The Episcopal Church, looks on during a Sept. 24 interfaith climate emergency event held at The Salvation Army in midtown Manhattan. Photo: Simon Chambers/ACT AllianceSpellers pointed to the day’s Gospel reading, Matthew 11:25-30, suggesting that, in it, Jesus is giving “loving advice” on how to lead a movement.“I would invite you to even just imagine together that, as we engage in a climate movement that is a part of the Jesus movement, that creation care and climate justice, for us, is not only about burden and negation, but instead about tapping into the true source, an invitation to abundance and living more like Jesus,” she said.Episcopalians, Lutherans, Roman Catholics, United Methodists, Muslims, Buddhists and Baha’i representing some 48 organizations came together to strategize ways faith-based organizations can address climate change by filling the gaps left by governments in regard to climate change and adaptation to its effects.The event included breakout sessions to address justice, loss and damage, migration and emergency declarations as related to climate change.The Episcopal Church has a long history of support for the environment and climate action.“Episcopalians are members of a transnational union: We can stand up for our brothers and sisters, be they in the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico or our Anglican brothers and sisters across seas, and we are one with them,” said the Rev. Melanie Mullen, The Episcopal Church’s director of reconciliation, justice and creation care. “[We can use our influence] to speak to bodies of power, to talk about their burdens and where they’re vulnerable, and hold our power and our privilege and use it well for those who are most vulnerable because they’re one of us in the part of our family.”Speaking truth to power, however, is not reserved just for the church’s leadership; Episcopalians across the church have indicated they care for the environment through letter writing and other local campaigns aimed at calling attention to climate change and prioritizing care for creation.“Episcopalians by far care about climate because of their faith in Jesus. [It’s] not just ancillary,” said Mullen. “And we care about people who are vulnerable. And we care about the world because of our interpretation of the Bible and of the way we read the Book of Common Prayer.”Episcopalians, Lutherans, Roman Catholics, United Methodists, Muslims, Buddhists, Baha’i and others came together on Sept. 24 to strategize ways faith-based organizations can address climate change by filling the gaps left by governments in regard to climate change and adaptation to its effects. Photo: Simon Chambers/ACT AllianceThe U.N. secretary-general convened a climate summit on Sept. 23, a day before the first high-level debates of the 74th session of the General Assembly meeting in New York through Sept. 30.The 2015 Paris agreement committed states to restricting global temperature rise to 2 degrees Celsius above pre-industrial levels. The agreement marked the first time nations came together under common cause to arrest climate change and adapt to its effects.“This summit was designed from the beginning to be a moment of especially governments announcing their plans to ramp up their ambition to achieve their zero carbon objectives that they have set for themselves with the Paris agreement,” said Lynnaia Main, The Episcopal Church’s representative to the United Nations. “But most governments are not meeting their targets. … At the current target, we are well above 2 degrees. And the science, scientists agree that two degrees itself is not where we actually want to or need to be. We should be at 1.5.”An October 2018 report release by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change further raised the alarm at the international level.“The report said we basically have 12 years to get this right before we reach the tipping point,” said Main. “Since that report came out, the level of urgency and alarm has risen dramatically within the U.N. And as a result of that report and the realization that governments aren’t meeting their targets, the secretary-general decided to hold this climate action summit to encourage governments to ramp up their ambition, so that we can try and achieve these targets.”The Anglican Church of Canada’s National Indigenous Archbishop Mark MacDonald pointed to interfaith efforts to protect the Arctic from oil drilling as a victory for faith-based environmental advocacy during a Sept. 24 interfaith gathering in New York. MacDonald also serves as the World Council of Churches president for North America. Photo: Simon Chambers/ACT AllianceThe action that resonated worldwide, however, occurred on Sept. 20, when more than 4 million people in more than 160 countries took to the streets in a global climate strike.The climate demonstration built on the momentum of youth-led school walkouts inspired by 16-year-old Swedish activist Greta Thunberg, who led the strike in New York and addressed the U.N. delegates on Sept. 23.“The eyes of all future generations are upon you,” said Thunberg, criticizing world leaders for their “business as usual” approach to addressing climate change. “If you choose to fail us, I say we will never forgive you.”Two of the New York climate strike youth organizers spoke during the Sept. 24 interfaith event at The Salvation Army.“World leaders are not getting it, elected officials are not getting it,” said Olivia Wohlgemuth, a 17-year-old climate activist from Brooklyn. “There are world leaders, when they speak, they talk about really progressive actions … but they don’t act.”Wohlgemuth and Xiye Bastida, who also addressed the interfaith gathering, said the youth intentionally made the strike an intergenerational event, recognizing that adults have the power to vote and have access to power in a way that youth do not. It was something Presiding Bishop Michael Curry acknowledged later that day when he suggested church leaders and church officials, who are used to leading, are following the youth this time.“We lead. … We’re used to that, and this is one time when we are following,” said Curry. “We are following the Gospel of Jesus Christ. We are following the God who is the author of creation and whose world this is.“But in this particular moment, we are following our children, who have called us to account for caring for God’s world, because the inheritance that is theirs will not be there in the fullness that it needs to be there. And we are being called to account, and so now, the churches are following the children. And that is maybe the way we find ourselves stumbling into God’s future and changing it.”Later in the evening on Sept. 24 before a reception held in his private residence, Curry added his signature to a joint statement between The Episcopal Church, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America and the Lutheran Church of Sweden outlining the churches’ “call to join in the care of creation.”“As we observe the Season of Creation, we renew the call for our churches to work together for the sake of Earth and to build collaborations wherever possible, both with other communities of faith and with diverse agents in our civil society. Now is the time for science, politics, business, culture and religion – everything that is an expression of human dignity – to address together this critical issue for our time,” read the statement.The statement served as testament to a relationship established between the three churches.“Climate change is a pressing critical issue for the future, and the present world,” said the Rev. Stephanie Johnson, who chairs The Episcopal Church’s Task Force on Creation Care & Environmental Racism, following the signing. “And that, regardless of how we move forward in politics, that the church itself will continue being the prophetic voice to change the world and be part of God’s creation.”– Lynette Wilson is a reporter and managing editor of Episcopal News Service. Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit an Event Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Advocacy Peace & Justice, Environment & Climate Change Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 By Lynette WilsonPosted Sep 25, 2019 Youth Minister Lorton, VA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Albany, NY Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Knoxville, TN Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Tags Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Smithfield, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR last_img read more

Learn more →

Judge bans citizenship question in 2020 census, says Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross ‘violated public trust’

first_imgliveslow/iStock(NEW YORK) — The Trump administration cannot ask a question about citizenship status in the 2020 census, a federal judge in New York ruled Tuesday.U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman concluded that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross had violated the public trust in his decision to include a citizenship question on the next census, calling Ross’s decision “arbitrary and capricious.”More than a dozen states, six cities, the U.S. Conference of Mayors and several immigrant rights advocacy groups claimed in a lawsuit filed in April that asking citizenship status as part of the census is unlawful and could undercount populations, thereby threatening billions in federal funds which relies on accurate population counts.A separate suit on the same issue was filed by the state of California and is currently being heard in San Francisco. The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments on the issue on Feb. 19.In his 277-page decision, Furman wrote that such a question would be constitutional, but that Ross had not followed proper procedures when he decided to add it.“He failed to consider several important aspects of the problem; alternately ignored, cherry-picked, or badly misconstrued the evidence in the record before him; acted irrationally both in light of that evidence and his own stated decisional criteria; and failed to justify significant departures from past policies and practices,” Furman wrote.On Tuesday, New York Attorney General Letitia James praised Furrman’s decision in a statement.“Today’s ruling is a win for New Yorkers and Americans across the country who believe in a fair and accurate count of the residents of our nation. The attempts by the Trump Administration to mandate a question about citizenship were not rooted in a desire to strengthen the census process and would only undermine our immigrant communities. Inciting fear in our residents is not only immoral but also ill-conceived,” James wrote.The last time the census asked respondents about their citizenship status was in 1950. Since then, the U.S. Census Bureau and former Bureau officials have opposed periodic efforts to reinstate a citizenship question on a universal basis.In March, Ross directed the Census Bureau to reinstate the citizenship question on the 2020 census. He said he included it to fulfill a request letter from the U.S. Justice Department, which argued it needed better citizenship data to enforce the Voting Rights Act.President Donald Trump took credit for this direction shortly after the announcement in an email his campaign sent to supporters: “President Trump has officially mandated that the 2020 United States Census ask people living in America whether or not they are citizens.”But in July, Furman questioned that rationale and ruled that the lawsuit could proceed.“There is no indication in the record that the Department of Justice and civil rights groups have ever, in the 53 years since the Voting Rights Act was enacted, suggested that citizenship data collected as part of the decennial census would be helpful, let alone necessary, to litigate such claims,” Furman wrote in his decision to allow the lawsuit to proceed at the time.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

Learn more →

When science is unreliable

first_imgNicole C. Nelson, Radcliffe’s Katherine Hampson Bessell Fellow, examines scientists’ assumptions about the natural world and how they play into their research. This year at Radcliffe, the assistant professor of science and technology studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will delve into the scientific reproducibility crisis, a recent phenomenon in which subsequent scientific investigation has found many supposedly stable findings to be difficult to replicate.Nelson will give a talk about her research titled “The Truth Wears Off? The Reproducibility Crisis in Historical Perspective,” on Feb. 6 as part of the Radcliffe Institute’s Fellows’ Presentation Series.Q&ANicole C. NelsonRADCLIFFE: What is the reproducibility crisis, and how did you become interested in it?NELSON: The reproducibility crisis is a recent phenomenon wherein scientists have found themselves unable to reproduce results that they thought were well-established. A study published in 2012 by the pharmaceutical company Amgen reported that its in-house scientists could replicate findings from the published literature on cancer in only six out of 53 cases (11 percent). That study got the attention of a lot of people in the biomedical community, including me.RADCLIFFE: What have been your methods for studying discrepancies in scientific results?NELSON: I’ve been doing oral histories with scientists to uncover the moments when they began to realize that the discrepancies they were seeing were part of a larger problem. Inconsistent results happen all the time in science, but there’s a tendency to dismiss these as just problems with a particular method, or with a particular lab. With my research partners, I’ve also been assembling a large database of opinion pieces, editorials, review articles, and newspaper articles, which we’ll analyze to identify key moments when the conversation about reproducibility starts to shift from a series of isolated events into something more systemic.RADCLIFFE: What are the ramifications of such widespread scientific inconsistencies?NELSON: One of the potential ramifications of the reproducibility crisis is that it might erode public trust in science. The public image of science has long been out of sync with the reality. We like to think of science as giving us truth and certainty, but what it actually gives us is a way to challenge our beliefs and weed out the predictions that don’t align well with what we see in the world. That’s a harder message to communicate, but I think it’s becoming increasingly obvious that we need to stop relying on the science-truth shorthand. Otherwise, nonscientists get the misleading impression that science is broken when they see findings being challenged and overturned.RADCLIFFE: Who are your heroes?NELSON: I’ve long had an academic crush on Anne Fausto-Sterling. Her research is hard to categorize. She works at the intersection of biology and gender studies and moves back and forth between humanistic and scientific methods, which is why I like her so much.RADCLIFFE: Which trait do you most admire in yourself?NELSON: That I can get myself to do things that I fear (most of the time, at least).RADCLIFFE: Who is your muse?NELSON: Enigmatic people or counterintuitive events really get my brain going. I love the feeling of gradually coming to understand something that at first seemed inscrutable to me. It’s a useful trait to have for doing ethnography, but I probably occasionally annoy people in my personal life by needling them with too many questions.RADCLIFFE: What inspires you?NELSON: Scholars who build communities that are rigorous, inclusive, and supportive. There’s a tendency in some corners of academia to assume that rigor means delivering devastating critiques, which can make academia feel isolating. I think the feminist science studies community does an especially good job of making sure that supporting each other and taking each other’s work seriously are not mutually exclusive.RADCLIFFE: What is your greatest triumph so far?NELSON: I’m enormously proud of my first book, “Model Behavior,” which explores what laboratory science looks like when researchers go in with the assumption that the phenomena they’re studying are complex. That, and my Radcliffe fellowship!RADCLIFFE: What is your fantasy career?NELSON: If I weren’t an academic, I might try my hand at teaching sewing or designing sewing patterns. I remember how transformative it was for me when I first realized that I could make clothes to fit my body rather than trying to remake my body to fit into off-the-rack clothes, and I’d love to share that feeling with others.RADCLIFFE: What is the most challenging aspect of being a Radcliffe fellow?NELSON: There’s very little that’s difficult about being a Radcliffe fellow! All the staff at the Institute put so much work into making it an ideal place to do research. Right now I have a three-minute commute to my office, dozens of interesting people to talk to, and all the (decaf) espresso I can drink — what’s not to love?This interview was edited for length and clarity.last_img read more

Learn more →

Experience pushes top performance

first_imgMany runners sign up for a race to motivate themselves to train harder. Musicians, too, reach their pinnacle when they perform for an audience. And perhaps credit union leaders give their latest project a special push when they are called on to present it to others.I’m thinking about this because I had the pleasure of hearing Jimese Harkley give her 2015 CUES Next Top Credit Union Exec final presentation last month. Harkley is philanthropy and community relations manager for $1.3 billion America’s First Federal Credit Union, Birmingham, Ala. At 35, she has led the CU to build a remarkable and successful strategy for its charitable donations.“I’m probably a hindrance to my CEO because I see the social side of this,” Harkley said lightheartedly during her talk at CEO/Executive Team Network. “Oh, it’s so fun. We should do this and this and this. But I had to stop and think, and this contest is what made me do that: ‘What’s the business case for why you have to have a strong strategy for your philanthropy?’”In her time on stage, Harkley acknowledged that November is a time of budgeting for many credit unions and recognized that many executives would be thinking about things like “not enough non-interest income” and “another EMV conversion” and “whether to budget that technology purchase.” She explained that her CU’s strong philanthropy strategy fits in with budget thinking because it engages employees and members to raise the money that’s given away—and then structures giving in a way that benefits both the CU and its community.Like Harkley’s, the initiatives and projects of all five CUES Next Top Credit Union Exec finalists were very impressive, significant and impactful. It’s clear the executives who lead these young contestants know that if you want to attract, develop and retain talent, you need to provide significant responsibility and relevant experiences to develop their skills and expertise.The experience of participating in the CUES Next Top Credit Union Exec contest has also helped emerging credit union leaders progress in their careers, making it a wonderful fit with CUES’ mission. Many who have taken part have moved on to roles with more responsibility in the CU movement—and almost 85 percent of them have stayed within the industry.Last year’s winner summed up the impact of his experience like this: “Being named the winner has given me a huge boost, both personally and professionally,” said Alex Castley, talent acquisition and development manager at $1.3 billion Integris Credit Union, Prince George, British Columbia. “It validated the work we are doing at my credit union, and gave a shot of confidence to all of us.”Each year the challenge gets better. There are more nominations, more participation in the voting, and better and better projects and presentations. All the facets of the effort show that giving young leaders responsibility and the experiences in sharing what they know helps push them to top performance—and that the future of credit unions is bright. 18SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pembroke Since joining CUES in March 2013, John Pembroke has played a leadership role in developing and launching a new direction in CUES’ strategy, branding and culture. Under his guidance, CUES … Web: www.cues.org Detailslast_img read more

Learn more →

Reduced Caribbean operations for American Eagle

first_img 13 Views   no discussions Share NewsRegional Reduced Caribbean operations for American Eagle by: – April 12, 2012 Share Tweetcenter_img Sharing is caring! Share St. John’s Antigua- American Eagle, an affiliate of American Airlines, has broken its silence over media reports that it plans to stop serving its San Juan hub from next year. In an email to OBSERVER Media the airline admitted that changes are coming.The company remained tightlipped for weeks, as speculation grew over the future of that leg of the company’s operations, serving the Caribbean through its ATR fleet.Initially, the airline made no announcement about changes to its schedule from Puerto Rico but in response to an email the company said it would reduce its operation from the US island.“As part of the restructuring process, American Airlines filed recently with the bankruptcy court, the company plans to return all of its ATRs to the lessors,” the company’s Corporate Communication Manager Dori Robau Alvarez said.“As the ATR fleet is returned back to the lessors, we expect that executive’s operations in San Juan will be reduced,” she added.The Dallas – based spokeswoman said the airline does not know the exact timing of these changes, as American is still developing the plan for executive’s operation.She said the Eagle plans to replace the ATR fleet but denied plans to close operations altogether.“American is also evaluating several replacement solutions to continue to provide service to the region. This evaluation should be completed some time later this year,” Alvarez said.In her email Alvarez did not say how this would affect staff in the region and has not responded to our request to be pressed further on the issue.Reports indicate that as part of its restructuring operation AA plans to shave US$75 million a year from labour costs. Local employees said they had not been made aware whether their jobs would be affected as a result of the company’s announcement.Antigua &Barbuda, as well as several other Caribbean countries is serviced by American Eagle out of Puerto Rico.VC Bird International Airport receives American Airlines flights operated by American Eagle from San Juan four times daily.American Airlines and parent AMR Corp. filed for bankruptcy protection in November.Antigua Observerlast_img read more

Learn more →

Holiday World & Splashin’ Safari added to the hall of fame

first_imgSANTA CLAUS, IN— The best roller coasters and free drinks, sunscreen and parking. What more could you ask for? Well, now there’s another great reason to visit Holiday World & Splashin’ Safari.The amusement and water park in southern Indiana was named to the TripAdvisor.com Hall of Fame on Monday.“TripAdvisor just notified us that our long history of receiving positive reviews has earned us an inaugural spot in their Hall of Fame,” said park president Matt Eckert. “We read every review and appreciate the feedback.”The TripAdvisor Hall of Fame recognizes businesses that have won the site’s “Certificate of Excellence” in at least five consecutive years.The certificate is awarded to the top 10% of attractions, restaurants, and lodging worldwide.In a separate recognition, Holiday World’s The Voyage was named the best roller coaster in Indiana by Popular Mechanics’ list of “The Best Roller Coaster in Every State.”last_img read more

Learn more →

Josephine Orji Caps Team Nigeria’s Brilliant Outing with Powerlifting Gold

first_imgRIO 2016 PARALYMPICSDuro IkhazuagbeNigerian power-lifter, Josephine Orji, last night shattered the World Record of the women’s -+86kg power-lifting event at the ongoing 2016 Paralympics Games in Rio, Brazil with a lift of 154kg to win the gold medal. The gold medal is Nigeria’s 8th at the 2016 Paralympics. Team Nigeria is comfortably seated in the 10th position on the overall medals table with 8 gold, 2 silver and one bronze.Poland’s Marzena Zieba who finished with 134kg settled for the silver finished while Holland’s Melaica Tuinfort got the consolatory bronze with her best lift of 130kg in the +86kg category.Orji’s performance yesterday capped the brilliant performance of Team Nigeria’s special athletes at the Games. The swashbuckling fair complexioned Nigerian lady who was sure of her capability opted to enter the battle with the other competitors on a frightening scale.She entered the contest with 151kg lift, a weight that was far beyond the capacity of any other competitor in her category.The only other lifter who came close to her effrontery, Egypt’s Nadya Ali failed in all her three attempts to lift 145kg.With the gold already in the kitty, Orji now set her mind at taking the World Record. Twice she failed to lift the 154kg but buoyed on by her vociferous teammates and Technical Adviser, Areh Feyisetan, Orji dug deep into her inner strength in the third attempt to surmount the obstacle and pocket the World Record.Her attempt at lifting 160kg was a mission impossible but was however consoled with climbing the podium for the precious gold and a world record to butt.Earlier in the day, Flora Ugwunwa had won the Women’s Javelin Throw – F53/54 event.With a throw of 20.25m, Ugwunwa set a new world record to beat Tunisia’s Hania Aidi and South Africa’s Ntombizanele Situ to second and third places respectively.Petit Lauritta Onye won Nigeria’s other track and field gold in the Shot Put event.Competing in the women’s shot put f40 event on the Day-four of the Rio Paralympics, Onye first heaved 7.83m that saw her break her world record of 7.72m set at the IPC World Athletics Championships in Doha, Qatar in 2015.Her second throw was 7.54m. She however went one centimeter further on her third attempt.Onye’s fourth attempt of 8.40m sent Team Nigeria camp into jubilation mood as it secured the fifth gold medal for the country.Onye’s medal is Nigeria’s seventh at the Rio Paralympic Games.Ndidi Nwosu defeated the defending champion to win women’s -73kg Powerlifting event gold medalNwosu was set for the bronze medal before she stepped up in her very last attempt, lifting 140kg to equal the Paralympics Record (PR) and usurp France’s Souhad Ghazouani for the gold.Another Nigerian, Bose Omolayo broke her own World Record (WR) and set a new one of 138kg to win gold medal.Earlier at the weekend, Team Nigeria’s captain, Lucy Ejike, broke the Paralympic and world record three successive times, to win the women’s -61kg event in power-lifting. Her successful attempt at 136.kg on Sunday set a new Paralympic record and world record.Ejike went on to set a bigger mark of 138kg, before lifting a massive 142kg.Another power-lifter, Paul Kehinde, had earlier at the weekend given Team Nigeria her second gold medal of the Games. Kehinde in the -65kg men’s category, lifted 218kg to beat his rivals to the gold medal.His gold came after Roland Ezuruike had on Friday won Nigeria’s first gold in Rio, also in power-lifting.China’s Peng Hu (200kg) finished second, while Egypt’s Shaaban Ibrahim (193kg) won the bronze medal.Latifat Tijani won silver in the women’s power-lifting -45kg on Friday, with Esther Oyema adding another silver in the women’s power-lifting -55kg category on Saturday.Team Nigeria’s eight gold, two silver and one bronze medals so far has better the Sydney 2000 Paralympics all-time haul of seven gold, one silver and five bronze medals.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

Learn more →

Unraveling the mysteries behind Sunday Oliseh’s resignation

first_imgTo many who didn’t know him, Sunday Ogorchukwu Oliseh was seen as an unknown saviour to the county’s football woes. Nigeria was dropping down the FIFA rankings, Stephen Keshi was calling “unworthy” players to the Senior National team and there seemed to be bad blood between the Nigeria Football Federation (NFF) and the coach.Oliseh’s appointment was supposed to be a breath of fresh air to the country. He came in with a UEFA Continental Pro licence (the highest football coaching licence), a 5 year plan on how he was going to turn things around for Nigeria and a promise to return Nigeria to the top.Knowing Nigerians would want his head if there were no immediate results, he asked for patience. On the 5th of November 2015, Oliseh took charge of his first game with the Super Eagles and that ended in a disappointing 0-0 draw against Tanzania.As expected excuses were made and Nigerians were made to swallow their pride while accepting that success did not come overnight.This did get better for the Super Eagles with a loss to DR Congo and an uninspiring 3-0 win over 9 man Cameroon side.In the next month, Oliseh continued his poor away form by drawing 0-0 against Swaziland in the first leg of the World Cup Qualifier but he won over some hearts by winning 2-0 in the return leg. However, drama is never far away from Oliseh. Before the friendlies against DR Congo and Cameroon, Nigeria’s most capped player and 2014 World Cup hero, Vincent Enyeama, was stripped of his captaincy.The issue started from Enyeama being granted a few extra days to bury his late mother but still arrived in camp late. As if that was not enough, Enyeama (according to Oliseh) disrespected the coach by trying to speak while he was addressing the players.Apparently, the Super Eagles’ goalkeeper was upset about being stripped of his captaincy without being informed prior to the incident. Enyeama also complained about being thrown out of camp and that his late mother was insulted by Oliseh. This seemed to be enough reason for Enyeama to call time on his stint as an international player as he announced his retirement.Oliseh was able to prove that he did not need Enyeama by keeping 3 cleansheets in 4 games and it seemed to be like things were going well for the Super Eagles coach until the CHAN tournament in Rwanda. Nigeria started very well with a 4-1 win over Niger Republic. They went on to draw 1-1 with group favourites Tunisia and then lost to eventual finalists, Guinea. The performance was seen as below par by the NFF and gave him what seemed to be his final warning based on the performance and his “unwarranted statements made in both social and regular media.”The NFF also went on to demand that Oliseh submits his list of players before they are called up for any match and he was also mandated to defend his training programme before the Federation.This seemed to be the straw that broke the camel’s back because on the 26th of February 2016, Sunday Oliseh announced his resignation on the Social Media platform Twitter.After considering the circumstances surrounding Oliseh’s resignation, I can only agree that he did the right thing. Not because he is a good man but he is a brave coward. Oliseh has always looked like a man that was running away from shadows. The man went to rant on social media about how people wanted him sacked and called his critics insane instead of sitting down to analyse the failure that was the CHAN tournament.Fine, he lost to a team that got to the final but in the end, but one does not go out and say that journalists have asked him to bribe them in order to write good things about him and have to apologise weeks later without giving at least a list of names.Even if Oliseh’s accusations were true, it shows how low he has fallen only 7 months into his job. Not only that, he seemed to be unsettled with his role as the Super Eagles’ coach.He was always chopping and changing his team, there was no style of play being implemented, the players never looked confident and he couldn’t even get the best out of arguably our best striker this season, Odion Ighalo. I applaud Oliseh for resigning because that was the best decision for the team and it also shows us that there could be some shady business going on in the Glass House.However I will criticise the timing of his resignation and call it cowardly. The least he could have done was resign after the second game against Egypt but I guess he didn’t believe that he could do it and so he ran away with his tail between his legs.I hope that Nigeria has learnt from this episode of high quality drama. It’s not the armchair coaches with the certificates and big mouths that can definitely carry out the job. Our supposed “African Pep Guardiola” ended up being our “African David Moyes”.Before we appoint our next coach, it is important to make sure that whoever comes in has a lot of experience and actually knows what he is doing. God helps those who help themselves. We need to pray less and act more to achieve results. God bless Nigeria.  –Follow Biola on Twitter: @OgbeniBiola. Get more updates on Facebook/Twitter with the #JoySports hashtaglast_img read more

Learn more →