Fearsome-Looking Terror Bird May Have Been Vegan

first_imgYou can’t judge a book by it’s cover.  In the same way, you can’t assume a large extinct bird with a huge beak was a terror-raising predator.Scientists have judged the so-called Terror Bird (Gastornis, formerly Diatryma) by its large, sharp beak and two-meter height.  They imagined it hunting down small mammals trying to evolve after the extinction of the dinosaurs some 55 to 40 million years ago.  Science Daily said,“The terror bird was thought to have used its huge beak to grab and break the neck of its prey, which is supported by biomechanical modelling of its bite force,” says Dr Thomas Tütken, from the University of Bonn. “It lived after the dinosaurs became extinct and at a time when mammals were at an early stage of evolution and relatively small; thus, the terror bird was though [sic] to have been a top predator at that time on land.”Now, however, a new study of its bones shows it was probably a herbivore.  German scientists measured isotopes in the bones of a specimen and found that “the calcium isotope compositions of terror bird bones are similar to those of herbivorous mammals and dinosaurs and not carnivorous ones,” they announced at the Goldschmidt Conference in Florence Aug. 29.  Additional work will be needed to confirm the new conclusion.  Will it be renamed the Peace Bird?This report about a German fossil concurs with one last year (11/23/12) based on evaluation of the beak, claws and legs of an American species.  It’s an ongoing warning to avoid jumping to conclusions by initial impressions or preferences: as one scientist admitted last year, “Let’s be honest: scary, fierce meat-eaters attract a lot more attention than gentle herbivores.” (Visited 9 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Water Theories Dry Up

first_imgIn the beginning, God created the heavens and the earth.The earth was without form and void, and darkness was over the face of the deep. And the Spirit of God was hovering over the face of the waters.And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light.And God saw that the light was good. And God separated the light from the darkness.God called the light Day, and the darkness he called Night. And there was evening and there was morning, the first day.And God said, “Let there be an expanse in the midst of the waters, and let it separate the waters from the waters.”And God made the expanse and separated the waters that were under the expanse from the waters that were above the expanse. And it was so.And God called the expanse Heaven. And there was evening and there was morning, the second day.And God said, “Let the waters under the heavens be gathered together into one place, and let the dry land appear.” And it was so.God called the dry land Earth, and the waters that were gathered together he called Seas. And God saw that it was good. Yes, God saw that it was good.  Water is good.  Water supported the life that came on the next three days in His creation plan.  Are we better off with the head-scratching theories of secularists who try to imagine a good world coming about by chance?  Scientists are great at studying present processes and learning how they work together to support life.  They are clueless getting a good earth by unguided natural processes.  Let their own words testify against them. Theories for how Earth got its water are parched for evidence, except for the tears of secular astronomers.According to Genesis, the earth began as a watery chaos not that long ago, so water was paramount from the beginning.  Evolutionary astronomers, by contrast, believe the earth was born in fire, billions of years ago, when a dust cloud collapsed into rocky planets in the inner solar system.  Where, then, did the earth get its water?  They don’t know.  A PhysOrg article announces, “Astronomers looking for clues to water’s origins.”  In other words, they’re clueless.A gas and dust cloud collapses to form a star. Amid a whirling disc of debris, little bits of rock coated with liquid water and ice begin to stick together. It is this stage of a star’s formation that astronomers hope to learn more about how water cycles through a solar system, although this is also when some of the least evidence is available to study.Science is supposed to deal in evidence, but the article admits the “least evidence is available’ to study the claim that earth’s building blocks included rock coated with water and ice.  One of the astronomers admits of the wet rock idea, “that is something that we have not been able to fully trace observationally.”  The claim, further, begs the question of where the ice and water on the rocky bits came from.  And it’s not the only thing missing in the secular theory:“The main parts that we are still missing are the story of when the cloud collapses, and then you go into the disc where the planets are formed. That is still the crucial time that we don’t fully understand,” said Ewine van Dishoeck, a Leiden University researcher.Yet those when’s and where’s are arguably the most important parts of their whole “story.”  How much, actually, do they “fully understand”?Subterranean WaterThe contrast between the Bible’s account and the secular account is exacerbated by a report posted on NASA’s Astrobiology Magazine that claims vast oceans of water may exist beneath the earth.  A paper in Nature describes finding minerals containing water trapped between the upper and lower mantle, particularly ringwoodite that is 1.5% water by weight.  A creation geologist would hardly be surprised, since the dry land emerged from the primeval water.  How, though, would a dusty disk supply those additional “vast oceans” of water, in a transition zone under the earth that “might have as much water as all the world’s oceans put together“?Another boost to the creation account is the fact that this mantle water helps make our planet habitable.  “One of the reasons the Earth is such a dynamic planet is because of the presence of some water in its interior,” Graham Pearson [U of Alberta] said. “Water changes everything about the way a planet works.”  Without this condition, would life have ever “emerged” by evolution?Surprisingly, the NASA article boasts that the discovery “confirms scientific theories about vast volumes of water trapped” in the mantle.  A look at the Nature paper shows that the theory only describes where water could reside in the mantle, not where it came from.  Planetary scientists still have to answer that question.  In the past, they postulated large wet asteroids bringing the water to earth after it cooled from its primeval fires – a kind of water balloon theory that secular scientists have tossed around for over a decade (see 3/26/02, 11/03/09, 7/23/12).  How those asteroids got their water is another mystery, to say nothing of how they gently impacted earth without destroying it.  The PhysOrg article fesses up:Some researchers trace the arrival of water on Earth to striking meteors, which contained water as well as the ingredients for amino acids and DNA. If enough of these materials arrived in the right combinations, the theory goes, life would have followed.Yet our understanding of water’s origins on planets is limited because the science is so new.Well, actually, it’s not so new.  They’re referring to searches for water on extrasolar planets, but the Nebular Hypothesis dates back to Kant and Laplace, which  applies to any planet’s formation.  Confirming the existence of water elsewhere, though, would only compound the problem: how did those planets get their water?  It’s not enough to say that stars generated water.  The water has to survive infernal heat when rocky planets initially coalesce by gravity.   PhysOrg explains,If water is created prior to stellar birth, then all planetary systems will be born with abundant water, giving rise to what could be life-friendly conditions throughout the universe. However, if this water is sometimes destroyed as the disc is formed, then water would not be as common in the cosmos.As we reported two days ago (3/31/14), observational evidence shows at least some dust disks around stars are crumbling, not forming planets.  The PhysOrg piece ends by hoping that further observations will decide between the current theories about how earth got its water (three or more competing theories).Wet Moon, TooDebates are still ongoing about the amount of water in moon rocks.  PhysOrg reported that a “misleading mineral” may have led to overestimates of water in the moon.  Astrobiology Magazine, though, reported that apatite in lunar basalts indicates water from the earth made it to our moon somehow (the debate may be over the quantity of water, not its presence).  This discovery might please creationist Dr. Walt Brown (Center for Scientific Creation), who postulates that supercritical water from the “fountains of the great deep” during the Flood sent large quantities of earth’s water into outer space, some of it hitting the moon. Secularists would not have expected this:According to the authors, their work is “challenging the paradigm of a “dry” Moon, and arguing that some portions of the lunar interior are as wet as some regions of the Earth’s mantle.” … These latest finding raise the odds that the Moon may have a partly-aqueous core today.Pondering Water’s DesignEveryone knows that water is vital to life on our planet, but scientists are still struggling to understand its properties.  Science Daily says it’s time to rewrite the textbooks again: the “Air-water interface is negatively charged by the adsorption of hydroxide ions.”  Readers may not have realized there has been a “long-standing controversy” about that critical aspect of water’s behavior.  A chemist at the University of Melbourne said, “We now need to rewrite the text book models of surface tension for the next generation of chemists who work at the refined molecular level.”  Another physicist gave this embarrassing confession: “I would estimate many hundreds of thousands of hours of computer time have been wasted because the theoreticians have not included the charge of the hydroxide in their boundary conditions for the simulations, thereby leaving out the strongest force in the system.”Scientists are continuing to learn about the many ways water enhances life.  It’s not just its presence, but how it interacts with geology.  PhysOrg wrote about “how mountains and rivers make life possible.”   The water cycle works hand in hand with the carbon cycle, the article explains, in a multitude of ways.  For instance, volcanoes erupt carbon dioxide into the air; water mixes with the CO2 in clouds and releases some of it as carbonic acid in rainwater, which helps erode silicate rocks.  Minerals thus washed into the ocean form limestone that gets released to the atmosphere by plate tectonics.Another consideration is the length of time that water spends flowing through the soil, a variable that scientists call the “fluid travel time.” The more time rainwater spends flowing through soils, the more weathering that occurs. The fluid travel time is in turn affected by the topography of the landscape – water tends to flow more slowly across a flat surface than down an incline.In the real world, these different factors interact in complex ways.What this means for us is that the self-limiting processes in the cycle “are important for maintaining CO2 levels within an acceptable range to maintain temperatures suitable for life.”  Researchers at Stanford are seeking to test “new hypotheses regarding how these processes may work together.”  Incidentally, if scientists still do not understand how these processes work together, how can they be confident about long-term climate trends?  And how can they say that human evolution is as simple as “Just add water“? (Nature; see 4/01/14).Considering all the admitted ignorance coming from the secular scientists in the stories above, we could hardly improve on the opening verses of Genesis 1 to explain God’s green earth, blessed by an abundance of water:center_img (Visited 92 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Biodegradable bread bags

first_imgAlbany Bakery supplies more than 10million South African households withbread every week.(Image: Stock.XCHNG )Janine ErasmusAlbany Bakery, one of South Africa’s major producers of bread products, is packaging all its products in biodegradable plastic bags since the beginning of April 2008. This is an industry first not only in South Africa but in the southern hemisphere and on the African continent.Spokesperson Khanyi Dhlamini of Tiger Brands, Albany’s parent company, says that the bread producer will be making a significant contribution to protecting the environment as it sends out over 500 million bags every year.Albany is a major player in the fast-moving consumer goods sector and its 12 plants supply 10,5-million South African households with bread each week. The move to biodegradable plastic, says Dhlamini, is the realisation of the company’s commitment to sustainability as well as to reducing its environmental footprint.Albany is taking responsibility for the amount of landfill plastic it produces and, furthermore, is tackling the problem through sustainable methods. The company decided to collaborate with UK-based Symphony Environmental Technologies, a specialist supplier of oxo-biodegradable plastics and plastic additives, to develop the bags, which disintegrate in a relatively short space of time.“In ideal weathering conditions, such as exposure to UV light and rain,” explains Dhlamini, “the bags would last for a year, but we calculate they will degrade in a landfill within a year to 18 months.”According to the South African branch of Symphony Environmental, Albany’s decision to move to biodegradable bags will result in the elimination of 3 000 tons of waste and litter from the environment every year.Safe, degradable plasticNormal polythene was invented in 1933 and can take up to 100 years to degrade – which means that just about all the polythene that has ever been produced is still around, buried in landfill sites around the world.Symphony Environmental’s product, known as d2w (degrade to water), is a polythene additive that gives degradable characteristics to plastic without affecting its other qualities, such as resistance to stress. It is environmentally friendly and has been approved by the European Union as safe to use in direct contact with food. The additive breaks down bonds between the carbon molecules of the plastic, and eventually the material loses strength and simply falls apart.The d2w-altered material can be manipulated in various ways for each specific application, through the use of stabilisers. This means that the degradation process can be controlled and factors such as the length of degradation time, and degradation triggers such as heat, oxygen or ultraviolet light, can be pre-set.Once the material starts to degrade it breaks up progressively until its molecules are small enough to be absorbed by micro-organisms. Finally, all that is left is a trace amount of carbon dioxide and water, which are the same substances exhaled by living creatures.Cutting-edge technologyAlbany is also working on this project with three of its trusted local packaging partners: Tropic Plastics in Kwa-Zulu Natal, and Nampak Flexibles and East Rand Plastics, both located in Gauteng. Durban-based company Tropic Plastics uses Symphony’s d2w additive in two cutting-edge films for Albany bread bags. Tropithene is an opaque film with a silky texture – consumers will find it around Albany’s Olde Cape range of breads, while the glass-clear Tropistar is used for all other bread bags.Extensive market research revealed that consumers would welcome the environmentally friendly initiative. While there is a cost implication, as non-biodegradable bags cost 1c to make compared to 1.5c for biodegradable bags, this will be absorbed by Albany. This is good news for consumers as well as for Albany and Tiger Brands, which weathered a severe storm in 2007 for fixing bread prices. The company incurred a heavy fine for this practice.Good environmental practice among the youthTo mark the initiative Albany has launched an art competition for primary, high and tertiary schools, where children are asked to create a work of art using Albany’s biodegradable bags. “Ideally, the artwork should represent some of the negative things the children would like to see disappear in South Africa, which could include things like guns, rats, cigarettes or knives,” says Dhlamini.The competition runs from May to October 2008, while entries close on 27 July 2008. Cash prizes will be awarded to winning schools.As an environmentally friendly brand, Albany is using the biodegradable bag initiative and the schools competition to help clean up the environment and simultaneously instil a deeply entrenched awareness of good environmental practice among South African youngsters.Moving to manage waste efficientlyIn South Africa a number of steps have been taken to cut down on the adverse effect of plastics on the environment. The National Environmental Management: Waste Bill was finalised in March 2008. The bill lays the foundation for the regulation and management of pollution and waste in South Africa, at the same time recognising the constitutional right of every South African to live in an environment that is not harmful to health.South Africa has set a national target to reduce the amount of five specific waste products – plastics, cans, paper, glass and tyres – going into landfills by 70% by 2022. The remaining 30% will also be dealt with effectively.South Africa banned the use of thin plastic shopping bags in 2003. The 17-micron thick bag was a familiar sight littering the roads of the country, until the South African government, driven by the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism, moved to clamp down on their ubiquitous and unwanted presence. Now plastic shopping bags are a minimum of 30 microns in thickness and shoppers have to buy them, or bring their own. A micron, or micrometer, is one-thousandth of a millimetre. A human hair is about 50 microns in diameter.The move boosted consumer awareness of both the costs of manufacturing plastic bags and the positive environmental impact of bags’ reuse. It also encouraged the use of bags made from other recyclable materials.Do you have queries or comments about this article? Email Janine Erasmus at [email protected] linksAlbany BakerySymphony EnvironmentalDegradable plasticsDepartment of Environmental Affairs and TourismPlastics Federation of South AfricaNational Environmental Management: Waste BillNational Waste Strategy Implementationlast_img read more

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Premier Foods expands into Swaziland

first_img“Following our transaction with Brait last year, we are now in a position to carry-out our strategy to actively participate in new sub-Saharan markets where we can acquire and grow assets aligned with our existing products and operations,” said Visser. In addition to gaining ownership of leading Swazi bread brand Supreme, Premier Foods also intends to introduce the Blue Ribbon brand, which is the company’s biggest bread brand in South Africa. Levendale added that it was pleasing to see that Swaziland’s economic woes did not deter essential foreign direct investment that supports Swazi ownership. The acquisition will give Premier Foods – which is known for brands such as Iwisa maize meal, Snowflake flour and Blue Ribbon bread – a major foothold in the market, as the two businesses it is buying command a 75% share of Swaziland’s bread market when combined. “These acquisitions fit perfectly with our investment criteria and we look forward to working closely with the management team to develop high quality but affordable products for the Swazi market,” Premier Foods group CEO Ian Visser said in a statement this week. Levendale said that the investment would bring several benefits including much-needed access to expertise in terms of improved technology, product quality and transfer of skills. 22 February 2012 South African staple foods manufacturer Premier Foods has acquired a controlling stake in two Swaziland-based bread and confectionary businesses, Mr Bread and Swaziland United Bakeries, for R85-million. This resulted in Premier Foods gaining improved access to capital for investments focused on the development of new products, capacity expansions and strategic mergers & acquisitions in new sub-Saharan markets.center_img Active sub-Saharan expansion Transfer of technology, skills Premier Foods will support the businesses technically and strategically to strengthen their market position. Wayne Levendale, currently MD of Mr Bread, will become CEO of the joint operations and will retain a major shareholding together with other key members of staff. “As a result, consumers can expect a better service through an improved delivery network and the introduction of new product ranges including high-end confectionary products at affordable prices,” he explained. In July last year, international investment group Brait increased its stake in Premier Foods to become a long-term strategic shareholder with a view to support Premier Foods’ next phase of growth. Premier Foods has been operating, in one form or another, since 1852 and currently operates 10 bakeries, five wheat mills, one maize mill and 16 distribution depots nationwide, employing over 5 000 people in manufacturing, distribution and marketing operations. SAinfo reporterWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Geocaching.com Presents: Favorites

first_img[This video contains spoilers with express permission from cache owners][vsw id=”AhuX7N8b3xw” source=”youtube” width=”425″ height=”344″ autoplay=”no”]Watch the Geocaching.com Presents: Favorites video above to explore how geocachers use Favorite Points to find and reward amazing geocaches. Geocaching Favorites was introduced in December of 2010. The feature allows Premium Members to award Favorite Points to the caches they enjoyed most. Everyone can see how many points a cache has received.  Since Favorites was added to the Geocaching.com website, more than 2.6 million Favorite Points have been awarded.Some geocachers award Favorite points to historic caches like The Original Stash Tribute Plaque. The location that records the placement of the first geocache ever has accumulated more than 900 Favorite Points. Creative and unique caches with spectacular stories also earn Favorite Points. Geist des Hagen, a clever geocache about a ghost who haunts the woods of Germany, has earned more than 1000 Favorite points.Premium Members earn one Favorite Point for each ten caches found. You can then award to an exceptional cache in your find history. For every ten caches that you find, you earn one Favorite to award to an exceptional cache in your find history. Basic Members also benefit by seeing how many Favorites a cache has earned in search results and on the individual cache pages.A geocacher from Maryland, United States says, “as a community we benefit by seeing more and more caches that have creative camouflage, and fantastic locations that we might not have visited, and that’s really what the sports all about!”  Watch the Geocaching.com Presents: Favorites video to find out more and see how you can discover and learn from amazing geocaches through Favorites.The next Geocaching.com Presents video showcases a difficulty five, terrain five geocache in Germany known as The Rock. It has more than 300 Favorite points. The Rock is scheduled for release on November 3rd. Geocaching.com will continue to release English, Czech and German language geocaching videos in the coming months. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to be one of the first to see new videos. Watch the more than 50 videos produced by Geocaching.com on our video page. Share with your Friends:More SharePrint Relatedlast_img read more

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Easier Interview Editing With DaVinci Resolve’s Smooth Cut Transition

first_imgDaVinci Resolve 12 debuts the Smooth Cut transition, mimicking Premiere’s Morph Dissolve tool. Interview editing has never been easier.Interview editing can be tricky. But with DaVinci Resolve’s Smooth Cut transition, you’ll have no problem getting around line flubs or seamlessly blending two cuts together.Let’s get into how DaVinci Resolve’s Smooth Cut works. In the Edit page, chop up the audio in your timeline as usual, taking out flubbed audio sections to create a more coherent performance. The video will be choppy since the person moves while talking; we’ll apply Smooth Cut to each of these edit points.I’ve edited out some of the speaker’s flubs, resulting in a timeline with several edits.Activate the Effects Library on the top left of the interface. Smooth Cut is in the Transitions category. Let’s be a little tricky. Hold down the Command key and click each of the edit points you made a moment ago, highlighting each of them. Right-click the Smooth Cut transition and choose Add to Selected Edit Points and Clips. The transition is added to every selection at once. Nice!Open up the Effects Library; Smooth Cut is near the top.If you just have one edit point or don’t feel like being tricky, simply drag the transition onto the edit point. Either way, you’ll have something that looks like the image below.The resulting clips all have the Smooth Cut transition on them with the default transition length set in the Editing preferences.By default, the transition will be one second, much longer than what we need. You can set the default transition length for future work in the Editing preferences.Set the transition duration here to whatever you prefer.Drag the transition to something lower, like 2 or 4 frames. Play the transition through and watch intently to make sure the transition is as seamless as possible.Smooth Cut works best when the transition duration is very small, like 2 or 4 frames.If the image jumps too much, try having the transition start or end on the edit point. To do this, right-click on the transition and select the appropriate option.One way to tweak the transition is to have it start or end on the edit. Right-click to pull up the options.Lastly, you can affect the Transition Curve to customize the transition’s shape. To access this, click on the tiny drop-down triangle on the bottom right of the transition.In DaVinci Resolve 12  you can customize transitions to tweak them for maximum effectiveness.Treat your audio in a similar way, adding short-length dissolves to minimize undesirable sounds created by the edit points.  I usually begin with a two-frame transition and tweak from there to taste.Here’s Alexis Van Hurkman, author of the DaVinci Resolve manual, on Smooth Cut:Neither DaVinci Resolve’s Smooth Cut nor Premiere’s Morph Dissolve will work in every single scenario, but it’s great to have this tool in the back pocket for when there’s no b-roll to cover a subject.How has your experience with the Smooth Cut been? What other features of DaVinci Resolve 12 are you most excited about? Let us know in the comments below!last_img read more

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Cristiano Ronaldo’s Portugal wins 1st Nations League title

first_imgLATEST STORIES Two-day strike in Bicol fails to cripple transport Duterte wants probe of SEA Games mess “It’s a great achievement, indisputable,” Portugal coach Fernando Santos said. “These victories will be part of Portuguese soccer forever.”Ronaldo, coming off a hat trick in the semifinals, lifted the winners’ trophy but wasn’t much of a factor in Sunday’s final, with the only goal coming from midfielder Gonçalo Guedes early in the second half at the Estádio do Dragão.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesSPORTSSingapore latest to raise issue on SEA Games food, logistics“Things have been going well for Portugal in recent years,” Ronaldo said. “The national team has won some important titles.”The hosts’ victory in UEFA’s newest competition, created to give national teams more meaningful matches than just friendlies, denied the Netherlands its first trophy since the 1988 European Championship. The revamped Dutch team was seeking some redemption after failing to qualify for the 2018 World Cup and the 2016 European Championship. Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting Portugal players celebrate with their trophy after defeating the Netherlands 1-0 in the UEFA Nations League final soccer match at the Dragao stadium in Porto, Portugal, Sunday, June 9, 2019. (AP Photo/Armando Franca)PORTO, Portugal — Three years after conquering European soccer for the first time, Portugal and Cristiano Ronaldo are celebrating another international title.Portugal won the inaugural UEFA Nations League tournament on Sunday, beating the Netherlands 1-0 to lift its first trophy since the 2016 European Championship.ADVERTISEMENT Ethel Booba twits Mocha over 2 toilets in one cubicle at SEA Games venue DA eyes importing ‘galunggong’ anew NBA free agency could make Raptors, Warriors both losers Cayetano: Senate, Drilon to be blamed for SEA Games mess Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. After the match, the Portuguese squad went to a public plaza in Porto where several thousand fans celebrated the win. Santos, Ronaldo and other players addressed the fans from a balcony.“We couldn’t have done this without you,” Ronaldo told fans.Ronaldo couldn’t do much against Dutch defender Virgil van Dijk in the matchup of likely contenders for the player of the year award, but Guedes couldn’t be stopped when he hit a powerful right-footed shot from outside the area in the 60th minute.Guedes started the build-up to the goal with a pass to Bernardo Silva, receiving the ball back at the top of the area and firing a firm low shot past Dutch goalkeeper Jasper Cillessen, who touched the ball but couldn’t parry it away.“It was a hard shot,” said Cillessen, who was making his 50th appearance with the Netherlands. “I saw it late.”ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ Some of the loudest chants at the stadium came from English fans who likely had expected their national team to reach the final. England ended third after defeating Switzerland 6-5 in a penalty shootout earlier Sunday in Guimaraes.Portugal defender Ruben Dias earned the man of the match award. Ronaldo ended top scorer in the Final Four with three goals, and teammate Silva was named best player. Netherlands midfielder Frenkie de Jong earned the best young player award for the finals.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Catholic schools seek legislated pay hike, too The Dutch had impressed in the group stage of the Nations League by eliminating the last two World Cup champions — France and Germany. It made it to the final after beating England 3-1 in the semifinal on Thursday.“At the start of this tournament I don’t think anyone would have believed us if we’d said we’d reach the final,” said Van Dijk, who hadn’t faced Ronaldo since the 2018 Champions League final between Liverpool and Real Madrid. “We’ve made a lot of progress. We have to be very proud of ourselves. Now disappointment is in our heads but we have to keep heads up. It’s been a good season.”Portugal, which eliminated Italy and Poland in the group stage and defeated Switzerland in the semifinals, had lost the 2004 European Championship final at home to Greece, but this time it got to celebrate the title in front of its fans after a scrappy match in Porto.The hosts were in control most of the match but struggled to get past the stout Dutch defense led by Van Dijk and Matthijs de Ligt.Ronaldo’s best chance was a header that went straight to Cillessen’s hands about 30 minutes into the first half.The Dutch improved after halftime but couldn’t create many significant scoring chances, with Memphis Depay coming closest with a 65th-minute header saved by goalkeeper Rui Patricio.The Netherlands kept pressing but Portugal was able to hold on to clinch the first Nations League title.“It was a bit better in the second half, and then the goal was (scored) and it became even more difficult because they are masters in defending when they are ahead,” Netherlands manager Ronald Koeman said. “We were not good enough tonight.”Santos made changes from the team that defeated Switzerland 3-1 in the semifinals, taking out 19-year-old Joao Felix from the starting lineup and adding Guedes to the attack. He also used Danilo in midfield and Jose Fonte to replace the injured Pepe in the middle of the defense.Koeman, a player for the Netherlands at the 1988 European Championship, kept the same squad that defeated England in the semifinals. ‘Rebel attack’ no cause for concern-PNP, AFP Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games View commentslast_img read more

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