TGIF Shopping: Patagonia Is Hitting The Road With Their Cross-Country Worn Wear Mobile Tour

first_img“That challenge of artistically fixing something is what keeps us passionate. People don’t always want something new. We have to find a renewed sense for patina. Something becomes more beautiful over time because it encapsulates memories.”That’s Nellie Cohen, Corporate Environmental Associate at Patagonia.She and her team are getting ready to hit the road for their Worn Wear Mobile Tour, a 14-stop, cross-country tour offering free repairs on busted zippers, rips, tears, buttons, pulls as well as tutorials on how people can fix their own gear.What’s the catch? There isn’t one. Patagonia simply wants to encourage customers to keep their clothes in use for as long as possible as a way to reduce overall consumption and lower our impact on the planet (somewhere Al Gore is quietly smirking).In short: They want to enrich the experience of hanging on to something you love.Staff from Patagonia’s repair facility in Reno, Nevada–the largest garment repair facility in North America–will be hitting the road beginning this Saturday, April 4, in a one-of-a-kind custom vehicle, created by artist/surfer Jay Nelson, and made from salvaged redwood wine barrels.Related: Conquer Adventure With Tim Burton’s Durable Goods CollectionThe 40-day tour commences in San Francisco before winding its way into Boston, Massachusetts on May 12.The challenges were many, such as figuring out how to build a small sewing shop in the back of a Dodge diesel truck. Yet they conquered this and every other hurdle they faced, and they did it not for work, but for love.“We received a garment recently, this woman’s jacket, it was just in tatters. It took a few months to figure out how we were going to revive it.” And those stories are not uncommon. “Another woman gave us a pair of ski pants that looked like a bear had shredded them, they were that worn out, but she wanted them patched still, and so we did it.”The tour will make stops at retail locations, coffee shops, farmers markets and trailheads, where, in addition to the repairs, Patagonia will be selling used Patagonia items as well as offering food, drinks and live music.Got non-Patagonia gear that needs fixing? Bring it in anyway. They’re the good kind of folks that will repair it for you on the spot, no questions asked.Asked to summate the entire experience, Nellie shared this:“The first letter in the short film we created, Better Than New, starts with ‘Dear Delia.’ That’s a real person. She ran our repairs department for several years. She passed away during the making of the tour from leukemia. I know she would be so proud of her employees out on the road sharing the spirit of repair. To see her memory honored is what makes it all worth it.”To get full tour details click here. Keep Your Pants On With the Best Belts for Men The Best CBD Oil and Skincare Creams for Managing Pain 14 Scandinavian Clothing Brands You Need to Know Patagonia Goes 100% Sustainable with New Line Called Shell, Yeah! The Best Men’s Work Pants for Getting Down to Business Editors’ Recommendations last_img read more

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UN agencies team up to provide health care for refugees returning to

A Memorandum of Understanding signed yesterday in Bujumbura, Burundi’s capital, by the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the World Health Organization (WHO) aims to provide an effective Minimum Care Package through integrated activities such as the provision of equipment and essential medicine in addition to the rehabilitation of health centres. “I hope that the signature of this memorandum will contribute to the reinforcement of our cooperation and that it serves as a reminder of our strong commitment,” Secretary General Kofi Annan’s Special Representative for Burundi Carolyn McAskie said at the signing ceremony. Joint planning is currently focusing on 200 health centres in the most affected communes in 10 provinces, where more than 10,000 returnees per province are expected over the year. But the memorandum lays the ground for a second phase including the consolidation of existing programs and an extension to the remaining provinces during 2005. All activities are conducted in partnership with non-governmental organizations (NGOs), which is essential for the success of this project. “Beneficiaries include returnees, IDPs (internally displaced people) and the local population in Burundi taking into consideration the specific needs of children and women,” said Cherif Benadouda, UNICEF Officer in Charge in Bujumbura. In 2003, 800,000 Burundians were estimated to be living in neighbouring Tanzania. Successful political negotiations have now stabilized the security situation and around half of the 281,000 IDPs have returned to their home communities. The process of voluntary repatriation, stipulated by the Arusha Agreement on Peace and Reconciliation signed by most of the parties to the conflict in 2000, started in 2002. During the first half of this year 52,062 refugees have returned voluntarily from Tanzania in a transfer mainly facilitated by UNHCR. This process might accelerate in the coming months depending on school breaks, harvest season and the planed election. read more

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