Watch: Rishabh Pant, Kuldeep Yadav play cricket in their hotel corridor ahead of 2nd ODI vs West Indies

first_img India Today Web Desk Port of SpainAugust 11, 2019UPDATED: August 11, 2019 11:36 IST Rishabh Pant Instagram videoHIGHLIGHTSIndia will be playing West Indies in the 2nd ODI in Port of Spain on SundayThe first match was washed out after just 13 overs bowled by IndiaIndia had swept the T20I series 3-0 against West IndiesIndia wicketkeeper Rishabh Pant and chinaman Kuldeep Yadav took cricket to a whole new level as they were seen playing in their hotel corridor ahead of the second ODI against West Indies on Sunday.The duo are leaving no stone unturned in their preparations for the second match after the first ODI was washed out with just 13 overs being bowled in the match.Kuldeep bowled to Pant, who had his wicketkeeping gloves on. The left-arm leg-spinner was getting some sharp turn despite bowling on a floor which was covered with a mat in their hotel corridor.”Where ? When ? What ? Who ? …. No sorry … I only know the “WHY”, Pant titled the video.After rain playing spoilsport in the first ODI of the three-game series in Guyana, India and West Indies have moved to the Queen’s Park Oval for the second game and both teams will be looking to start on the attack after a washed out opening game. Interestingly, Chris Gayle has been ignored for the Test series, so this game and the last one at the same venue could be the last couple of times that one sees the legend take the field on the international stage.For India, it will be about starting afresh after a disappointing loss in the semi-final of the 2019 World Cup. The batting looks solid at the top with Shikhar Dhawan coming back to join Rohit Sharma and skipper Virat Kohli will once again get to play freely at the no.3 position as he doesn’t need to worry about building the innings as he had to during the showpiece event in England.advertisementThe middle-order kind of picks itself as the team didn’t get to bat in the opening game. So while Shreyas Iyer should get another go after having made the XI in the first game, Rishabh Pant definitely will be playing the role of the finisher unless there is a top-order collapse. Kedar Jadhav is also set to get a game over Manish Pandey as was the case in the opening tie.Also Read | Chris Gayle 300: Can India play party poopers in West Indies star’s landmark ODI?Also Read | India vs West Indies 2nd ODI: Dream 11 Prediction, captain and vice-captainAlso Read | India head coach interview likely after Independence DayFor sports news, updates, live scores and cricket fixtures, log on to indiatoday.in/sports. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter for Sports news, scores and updates.Get real-time alerts and all the news on your phone with the all-new India Today app. Download from Post your comment Do You Like This Story? Awesome! Now share the story Too bad. Tell us what you didn’t like in the comments Posted byrohan sen Tags :Follow India VS West IndiesFollow Rishabh PantFollow Kuldeep Yadav Watch: Rishabh Pant, Kuldeep Yadav play cricket in their hotel corridor ahead of 2nd ODI vs West IndiesRishabh Pant was seen keeping wickets to Kuldeep Yadav in their hotel corridor ahead of India’s 2nd ODI against West Indies on Sunday.advertisementlast_img read more

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Jewish athletes condemn antiSemitism after temple shooting

FOXBOROUGH, Mass. — Memphis Grizzlies forward Omri Casspi, who was born in Israel, was early in his NBA career when he saw a picture of himself defaced with a swastika. Arizona Cardinals quarterback Josh Rosen grew up with kids who made fun of the size of his nose.New England Patriots receiver Julian Edelman has heard anti-Semitic taunts during games, but he had been willing to write them off as opposing fans “just trying to get underneath your skin.”“You’ve been called stuff here and here,” Edelman said. “But nothing to the extent where it’s got me feeling the way a lot of Jews are feeling right now.”In the month since a massacre at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh killed 11 people and injured six others, Jewish athletes said they were shocked by the shooting yet not concerned for their own safety as they travel, train and compete.“There’s crazy people out there, and it is what it is,” Casspi said. “The notion is that anti-Semitism is dead — it’s always going to be (around). Some people are just like that. There’s going to be racist people, there’s going to be anti-Semites.”Robert Bowers has pleaded not guilty to murder and hate crime charges in the Oct. 27 shooting during Shabbat morning services. He remains jailed without bail.Americans of all religions have rallied in support for the victims of the deadliest anti-Semitic attack in U.S. history. Hometown quarterback Ben Roethlisberger wore cleats integrating a Jewish star into the Pittsburgh Steelers logo, along with the words “Stronger than Hate.”But for Jewish athletes, the shooting hit especially hard.“I’m horrified by it,” said Los Angeles Angels manager Brad Ausmus, who managed the Israeli team in the 2013 World Baseball Classic. “Just the callousness and the loss of life. It takes someone that’s unhuman to do something like that to innocent people.”Jews in the United States have long cherished role models like Detroit Tigers slugger Hank Greenberg, Chicago Bears quarterback Sid Luckman or Olympic swimmer Mark Spitz. And any history of Jewish athletes includes the time Dodgers ace Sandy Koufax refused to pitch in the World Series because it conflicted with the holiday of Yom Kippur.Other Jewish players remain scattered throughout sports — a point of pride for fellow Jews but also a potential target for anti-Semitism.“Sometimes people don’t even think they’re being racist, but they might be a little offensive,” Rosen said.Casspi said he has always felt safe in the U.S., but while playing in Europe his Israeli team at times encountered violent protesters or played with no fans in the arena out of safety concerns.Athletes speak often of worrying only about things within their control; as far as game preparation goes, racism and religious bigotry qualify as distractions. And so Edelman’s inclination was to “keep your head down” and not let it bother him.“A lot of guys have got to deal with a lot of stuff when it comes to name calling,” he said. “You get so wrapped up in football and your assignment that you brush stuff off and don’t let it get to you. … You take the high road, and you go from there.”But after the synagogue shooting, Edelman decided it was time to go public.Following the Patriots’ Nov. 4 victory over the Green Bay Packers, he wore an Israeli baseball cap for his postgame interviews as a shoutout to those in Pittsburgh.“It’s disgusting what happened. And I’m just backing them up,” he said in a follow-up interview. “I’m proud of who I am and what I am. Just to let these victims know: ‘We’re all with you. This is a very tough time for you. I can’t even imagine. But you have support.’”“It’s not like one of those things where you’re gonna put your head under the ground and kind of hide,” he said. “You’re gonna say, ‘Hey, that’s what makes us stronger.’”Rosen has also embraced his Judaism, developing a celebration dance called “The Hebrew Hammer” in the hopes that he can be a role model for Jewish fans and a leader in a locker room that includes a variety of races and religions.“You can identify with any leader or role model you want. I’m just trying to be a good one,” he said. “It is a part of me that I’m proud of, culturally.”Ausmus said many of the Jewish baseball players have a kinship, some of it from being part of a minority in the sport and some from playing together in the World Baseball Classic. “(It) has kind of fostered that feeling of connection,” he said.“They’re spread throughout … 25 different organizations, they come together,” Ausmus said. “Every four years, you make that connection based on your heritage.”A three-time Gold Glove catcher who went to Dartmouth and played 18 years for four major league clubs, Ausmus said he wasn’t particularly religious when growing up with a Jewish mother and Protestant father.The only time he experienced anti-Semitism as a major leaguer was when a fan shouted things at a teammate.The thing is, he wasn’t even Jewish.“His last name sounded Jewish,” Ausmus said. “So the fan was ignorant in a couple different areas.”___AP Sports Writers Kyle Hightower, Janie McCauley, Noah Trister and Robert Baum contributed to this report.Jimmy Golen, The Associated Press read more

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