TGIF Shopping: Patagonia Is Hitting The Road With Their Cross-Country Worn Wear Mobile Tour

first_img“That challenge of artistically fixing something is what keeps us passionate. People don’t always want something new. We have to find a renewed sense for patina. Something becomes more beautiful over time because it encapsulates memories.”That’s Nellie Cohen, Corporate Environmental Associate at Patagonia.She and her team are getting ready to hit the road for their Worn Wear Mobile Tour, a 14-stop, cross-country tour offering free repairs on busted zippers, rips, tears, buttons, pulls as well as tutorials on how people can fix their own gear.What’s the catch? There isn’t one. Patagonia simply wants to encourage customers to keep their clothes in use for as long as possible as a way to reduce overall consumption and lower our impact on the planet (somewhere Al Gore is quietly smirking).In short: They want to enrich the experience of hanging on to something you love.Staff from Patagonia’s repair facility in Reno, Nevada–the largest garment repair facility in North America–will be hitting the road beginning this Saturday, April 4, in a one-of-a-kind custom vehicle, created by artist/surfer Jay Nelson, and made from salvaged redwood wine barrels.Related: Conquer Adventure With Tim Burton’s Durable Goods CollectionThe 40-day tour commences in San Francisco before winding its way into Boston, Massachusetts on May 12.The challenges were many, such as figuring out how to build a small sewing shop in the back of a Dodge diesel truck. Yet they conquered this and every other hurdle they faced, and they did it not for work, but for love.“We received a garment recently, this woman’s jacket, it was just in tatters. It took a few months to figure out how we were going to revive it.” And those stories are not uncommon. “Another woman gave us a pair of ski pants that looked like a bear had shredded them, they were that worn out, but she wanted them patched still, and so we did it.”The tour will make stops at retail locations, coffee shops, farmers markets and trailheads, where, in addition to the repairs, Patagonia will be selling used Patagonia items as well as offering food, drinks and live music.Got non-Patagonia gear that needs fixing? Bring it in anyway. They’re the good kind of folks that will repair it for you on the spot, no questions asked.Asked to summate the entire experience, Nellie shared this:“The first letter in the short film we created, Better Than New, starts with ‘Dear Delia.’ That’s a real person. She ran our repairs department for several years. She passed away during the making of the tour from leukemia. I know she would be so proud of her employees out on the road sharing the spirit of repair. To see her memory honored is what makes it all worth it.”To get full tour details click here. Keep Your Pants On With the Best Belts for Men The Best CBD Oil and Skincare Creams for Managing Pain 14 Scandinavian Clothing Brands You Need to Know Patagonia Goes 100% Sustainable with New Line Called Shell, Yeah! The Best Men’s Work Pants for Getting Down to Business Editors’ Recommendations last_img read more

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Mobile phones ruining the theatre Blame the middle aged Sherlock star says

first_imgHugh Jackman: not a fan of phones ringing in the theatre “Because if they’re fans of Sherlock or something like James Bond, [people assume] they’re not possessed of the qualities necessary to spend hours in the theatre without Snapchatting. Publicity shots for Andrew Scott in Hamlet Benedict Cumberbatch as Hamlet at the Barbican in 2015 It is the absolute blight of the modern theatre: the flashing lights and relentless ringing of a mobile phone piercing the stalls.But critics should not be too hasty to blame the younger generation, one actor has warned, as he claims the culprits are in fact the middle-aged.Andrew Scott, star of BBC Sherlock and Hamlet at the Almeida Theatre, has said young fans are unfairly blamed for disrupting the theatre, being written off as “savages” without evidence. The following year, he threatened to leave the stage when phone ringing three times interrupted a performance of the History Boys on Broadway. It helps pivot debate towards mastery of phone, opposed to false lazy assumption of yoof vs “etiquette”. FOH & Actors witness daily reality. https://t.co/kX3a25bmt7— Cumberphone Campaign (@cumberphone) April 30, 2017 Benedict Cumberbatch as Hamlet at the Barbican in 2015 The Cumberphone Campaign, a social media movement named for Benedict Cumberbatch’s plea to theatregoers, said Scott’s comments were “spot on”, helping to “pivot debate towards mastery of phone, [as] opposed to false lazy assumption of yoof vs ‘etiquette’.”In 2015, Cumberbatch issued a personal plea at the Barbican stage door, insisting phone use was becoming “blindingly obvious”.“I can see cameras, I can see red lights in the auditorium,” he said.Last year, Richard Jordan, an award-winning theatre producer,  described  “possibly the worst West End audience I have ever encountered” after seeing Kit Harington from Game of Thrones in Doctor Faustus.  Hugh Jackman: not a fan of phones ringing in the theatre In fact, he argued, ringing mobile telephones invariable belong to their technophobic elders, who ignore them or struggle to switch them off as actors watch on helplessly from the stage.Scott is one of a cohort of television stars luring young fans into the theatre, with those who have admired his work as Moriarty in Sherlock stretching their cultural tastes to Shakespeare.His colleague Benedict Cumberbatch did similarly at the Barbican, while Kit Harington transferred some of the buzz from Game of Thrones to the West End last year. As a second phone went off, co-star Craig added: “Just get the phone.”In 2013, Diana Quick improvised a cutting retort during The American Plan at the St James Theatre in London, staying in character to tell a phone owner: “That’s an awful habit.” Kit Harington in Game of Throneslast_img read more

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