Prince Harry Is there any one of the royal family who wants

first_img“Is there any one of the royal family who wants to be king or queen?“I don’t think so, but we will carry out our duties at the right time.”Describing how he tries hard to maintain normality by doing his own supermarket shopping, he admitted making the Royal family accessible is a “tricky balancing act”, saying: “We don’t want to dilute the magic. The British public and the whole world need institutions like it.” “It has got me into trouble in the past, partly because I cannot stand the idea of people mincing around the subject rather than just getting on with it.”Prince Harry, along with other senior Royals, has gradually taken on more official duties, aiding the Queen and fighting for his own charitable causes. Prince Harry said he hopes to make a difference in the ‘smallish window’ before Prince George and Princess Charlotte take over Prince Harry champions the Invictus Games Prince Harry walks behind his mother’s coffin aged 12 Prince Harry said he hopes to make a difference in the 'smallish window' before Prince George and Princess Charlotte take over Prince Harry visits Borough Market Prince Harry attending the Household Division’s Beating Retreat at Horse Guards Parade Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Prince Harry walks behind his mother's coffin aged 12 “My mother had just died, and I had to walk a long way behind her coffin, surrounded by thousands of people watching me while millions more did on television,” he said.”I don’t think any child should be asked to do that, under any circumstances. I don’t think it would happen today.”Prince Harry has previously spoken frankly about his struggle to come to terms with his mother’s death, telling the Telegraph he had buried his grief for 20 years. The Prince also spoke of his late mother, Diana, Princess of Wales, and her 1997 funeral at which he walked behind her coffin at the age of 12. Prince Harry attending the Household Division's Beating Retreat at Horse Guards Parade No-one in the Royal family really wants to be king or queen, Prince Harry has suggested, as he vows they will carry out their duty for the “greater good of the people”.Prince Harry, 32, said his family are “not doing this for ourselves”, as he speaks of trying to maintain an ordinary life alongside his extraordinary duties.Saying he is now involved in modernising the British monarchy, he added the young Royals are determined to continue the “positive atmosphere” his grandmother the Queen has inspired for more than 60 years.In an interview with Newsweek, an American magazine, he said: “We are not doing this for ourselves but for the greater good of the people… Prince Harry champions the Invictus Games In an interview at Kensington Palace, he said: “I am now fired up and energized and love charity stuff, meeting people and making them laugh.“I sometimes still feel I am living in a goldfish bowl, but I now manage it better.“I still have a naughty streak too, which I enjoy and is how I relate to those individuals who have got themselves into trouble.”He added he “knows instinctively” which charities his mother would have liked him to work for, joking: “Sometimes, I can have too much passion. Saying he feels in a hurry to “make something of my life”, he said of his choice to focus on key causes: “The Queen has been fantastic in letting us choose. She tells us to take our time and really think things through. Prince Harry visits Borough MarketCredit:PA “We use our time wisely. We don’t want to turn up, shake hands but not get involved.”last_img read more

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Calls for junk food to have graphic cigarettestyle warnings on packaging

Show more Graphic health warnings on food packets – similar to those used for cigarettes – could prompt people to abandon “hedonistic impulses” and choose healthier foods, a study suggests.The study, by the University of Melbourne and Cancer Council Victoria, monitored the brain activity of 95 people as they were shown packages of 50 foods such as chips, chocolate bars, biscuits, nuts, fruits and vegetables.It found that warning labels prompted people to exercise more self-control rather than act on impulse.“The study shows that if you want to stop people choosing fatty and sugary packaged foods, health warnings actually work,” said Stefan Bode, from the University of Melbourne.“The food industry uses all sorts of positive cues to encourage you to eat, playing on taste, how it will make you feel good, making it look appetising, but when it comes to unhealthy foods – this is dangerous.” Ministers will publish updated childhood obesity strategy within weeks, amid calls for tougher labelling on unhealthy foods and drinks, and signals of a likely restriction on TV advertising.Prof Anna Peeters, lead author of the Deakin research, said: “The question now is what kind of impact these labels could have on the obesity epidemic. If there was political palatability for graphic warnings, that had the strongest effect so that’s what I would go for.”Gavin Partington, director-general at British Soft Drinks Association, said: “Experience in the UK suggests that action industry is taking is having ample effect in changing consumer behaviour. In fact, sugar intake from soft drinks in the UK has fallen by almost 19 per cent since 2013.” Pictures of crooked, decayed teeth were the most likely to deter consumers from buying sugary drinks, reducing desire by 36 per cent.When cans carried images showing how many teaspoons of sugar was contained, the chance dropped by 18 per cent. Jamie Oliver, the TV chef, is among those who have called for such labels to be placed on sugary drinks.And star ratings which rated a drink on how healthy it was cut the chance of a purchase of buying an unhealthy drink by 20 per cent.Researchers from Deakin University, in Australia, said the findings present a “compelling” argument for warnings to be implemented globally. The researchers asked people to rate their desire to eat each food before and after viewing various health warnings. Some used only text, others included graphic images of damaged hearts or a corpse beneath a sheet with messages such as “An unhealthy diet can shorten your life”.Helen Dixon, from Cancer Council Victoria, said: “Strong cues, like anticipated taste, tend to work on us in a more unconscious way. Therefore health messages need to disrupt these more impulsive, hedonistic responses to foods and make people consider the health implications of their choices.”It came as a separate study, presented at the European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, found images of rotten teeth on cans of sugary drinks could cut sales by more than a third.The study on 1,000 people aged 18 to 35 tested their likelihood of making purchases, after different labels were placed on the sides of products. Jamie Oliver, the TV chef, is among those who have called for such labels to be placed on sugary drinksCredit:Simon Dawson/Bloomberg News Jamie Oliver, the TV chef, is among those who have called for such labels to be placed on sugary drinks Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. read more

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