Scientists successfully graft neural precursor cells into spinal cords of syngeneic pigs

first_img Source:http://ucsdnews.ucsd.edu/pressrelease/reprogrammed_stem_cell_derived_neurons_survive_long_term_in_pigs_with_spina May 10 2018A major hurdle to using neural stem cells derived from genetically different donors to replace damaged or destroyed tissues, such as in a spinal cord injury, has been the persistent rejection of the introduced material (cells), necessitating the use of complex drugs and techniques to suppress the host’s immune response.In a new paper, publishing May 9 in Science Translational Medicine, an international team led by scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine describe successfully grafting induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neural precursor cells back into the spinal cords of genetically identical adult pigs with no immunosuppression efforts. The grafted cells survived long-term, displayed differentiated functionality and caused no tumors.The researchers also demonstrated that the same cells showed similar long-term survival in adult pigs with different genetic backgrounds after only short course use of immunosuppressive treatment once injected into injured spinal cord.”The promise of iPSCs is huge, but so too have been the challenges. In this study, we’ve demonstrated an alternate approach,” said senior author Martin Marsala, MD, professor in the Department of Anesthesiology at UC San Diego School of Medicine and a member of the Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine.”We took skin cells from an adult pig, an animal species with strong similarities to humans in spinal cord and central nervous system anatomy and function, reprogrammed them back to stem cells, then induced them to become neural precursor cells (NPCs), destined to become nerve cells. Because they are syngeneic -; genetically identical with the cell-graft recipient pig -; they are immunologically compatible. They grow and differentiate with no immunosuppression required.”Co-author Samuel Pfaff, PhD, professor and Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator at Salk Institute for Biological Studies, also noted: “Using RNA sequencing and innovative bioinformatic methods to deconvolute the RNA’s species-of-origin, the research team demonstrated that pig iPSC-derived neural precursors safely acquire the genetic characteristics of mature CNS tissue even after transplantation into rat brains.”Related StoriesSingle-cell encapsulation technology can protect transplanted MSCs from immune attackAlternate cell growth pathway could open door to new treatments for metastatic cancersExciting study shows how centrioles center the process of cell divisionIn their study, researchers grafted NPCs into the spinal cords of syngeneic non-injured pigs with no immunosuppression. The researchers found that the NPCs survived and differentiated into neurons and supporting glial cells at all observed time points. The grafted neurons were detected functioning seven months after transplantation.Then researchers grafted NPCs into allogeneic (genetically dissimilar pigs) with chronic spinal cord injuries, followed by a transient four-week regimen of immunosuppression drugs. They found similar results with long-term cell survival and maturation.”Our current experiments are focusing on generation and testing of clinical grade human iPSCs, which is the ultimate source of cells to be used in future clinical trials for treatment of spinal cord and central nervous system injuries in a syngeneic or allogeneic setting,” said Marsala.”Because long-term post-grafting periods -; one to two years -; are required to achieve a full grafted cells-induced treatment effect, the elimination of immunosuppressive treatment will substantially increase our chances in achieving more robust functional improvement in spinal trauma patients receiving iPSC-derived NPCs.””In our current clinical cell-replacement trials, immunosuppression is required to achieve the survival of allogeneic cell grafts. The elimination of immunosuppression requirement by using syngeneic cell grafts would represent a major step forward” said co-author Joseph Ciacci, MD, a neurosurgeon at UC San Diego Health and professor of surgery at UC San Diego School of Medicine.last_img read more


Novel approach to visualize how platelets are formed in body

first_img Source:http://www.bristol.ac.uk/news/2018/june/imaging-challenges-platelet-understanding-.html Jun 25 2018Platelets are uniquely mammalian cells, and are the small cells of the blood that are critical for us to stop bleeding when we cut ourselves. They are also a central part of the process of thrombosis, which underlies heart attacks and stroke, and form the target of major drugs used in the treatment of these diseases, such as aspirin. These cells are formed from large precursor cells, megakaryocytes, in the bone marrow and the lung, at a remarkable rate of 100 billion platelets per day in adult humans (that is one million platelets per second).Despite this hugely active process, we still do not understand the details of how platelets are formed in the body. Dysfunction in the process underlies many cases of low platelet count and associated bleeding disorders, and so understanding the process better is essential in order to improve the healthcare we can offer to those affected.Related StoriesFDA grants accelerated approval to new treatment for refractory multiple myelomaCancer incidence among children and young adults with congenital heart diseaseStudy provides new insight into blood cell and immune cell productionThe study ‘Multiple membrane extrusion sites drive megakaryocyte migration into bone marrow blood vessels’ has been published in the new journal Life Science Alliance (jointly published by EMBO, Cold Spring Harbor Press and Rockefeller Press). It is a collaboration between researchers at the University of Bristol, Imperial College London, the Francis Crick Institute, the University of Glasgow, the University of Oxford and MRC Weatherall Institute of Molecular Medicine. It details how researchers have used a novel approach to visualize the process in vivo, called intravital correlative light-electron microscopy.Professor Alastair Poole, from the University of Bristol, who contributed to the research said; “The results have allowed us to propose a new mechanism for platelet production. In contrast to current understanding we found that most megakaryocytes enter the sinusoidal space as large protrusions, rather than extruding fine proplatelet extensions (as is currently thought)”.The research highlights this difference is important because the mechanism for large protrusion differs from that of proplatelet extension. Proplatelets extend by the sliding of dense bundles of microtubules, whereas the detailed in vivo data shows an absence of these bundles, but the presence of multiple fusion points between the internal membrane and the plasma membrane, at the leading edge of the protruding cell. Mass membrane extrusion therefore drives megakaryocyte large protrusions into the blood vessels of the bone marrow, significantly revising our understanding of the fundamental biology of platelet formation in vivo.The findings are likely also to change our view of the mechanisms of diseases that affect platelet production and the deficiency of platelets in the blood (thrombocytopaenia).last_img read more


St Helens uses Patientrack eobservations system to enhance fluid balance monitoring reduce

first_imgProviding frontline clinical staff with the means to embed their clinical expertise into the systems they use is absolutely essential for technology to remain relevant and useful in the NHS.This is a powerful example of our NHS customers innovating with technology to deliver enhanced patient safety, and it is great to see the work recognized as it is shortlisted in the national Patient Safety Awards, an opportunity to share best practice and to allow more people to learn about the impact of this important project.” Source:http://www.sthk.nhs.uk The implementation of the innovation of eFluid charting has vastly enhanced patient safety. This means we have more accurate charting, calculations and therefore higher quality patient fluid plans, whilst providing an enhanced user experience for bedside data entry and recognition of deterioration.” Related StoriesNutritional supplements offer no protection against cardiovascular diseases, say researchersCancer mortality at an all time low finds reportAvoid ultra-processed food!Led by the Acute Kidney Injury Team at the trust, the project contributed to a 23% improvement in the fluid and electrolyte disorder indicator that is included within the Hospital Standardized Mortality Ratio: a national benchmark for patient mortality.Moving to a paperless electronic system has also eliminated calculation errors, and saw a reduction on length of stay of more than two days for patients with acute kidney injury, a condition linked to thousands of deaths across the country each year.The work is expected to be of interest to other NHS hospitals, with national reports highlighting as many as one in five patients across the country on IV fluids and electrolytes suffering complications or morbidity due to inappropriate fluid administration.Donald Kennedy, managing director at Patientrack, said: Jul 3 2018Trust uses Patientrack e-observations system to enhance fluid balance monitoring, reducing risks for patients and becoming shortlisted for national Patient Safety Awards.NHS professionals at a North West trust have been shortlisted for the prestigious national Patient Safety Awards, following important work around rapid response for deteriorating patients.The team at St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust innovated with their Patientrack electronic observations system to tackle a major cause of complications for patients on intravenous fluids and electrolytes.The Acute Kidney Injury Team drew on their clinical expertise to enhance how staff use Patientrack to monitor fluid balance, with the system already used by the trust more widely for bedside observations, to capture patient vital signs, and to deliver electronic early warning scores that allow the sickest patients to be quickly identified.The new use of the system resulted in reduced length of stay and mortality often associated with poor fluid management in hospitals.Ragit Varia, Consultant in Acute Medicine and Clinical Director of the Acute Medical Unit at St Helens and Knowsley Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust, said:last_img read more


Women with PCOS more likely to have an autistic child

first_imgAug 1 2018Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are more likely than other women to have an autistic child, according to an analysis of NHS data carried out by a team at Cambridge University’s Autism Research Centre. The research is published today in the journal Translational Psychiatry.PCOS affects about one in ten women and is caused by elevated levels of the hormone testosterone. It is associated with fluid-filled sacs (called follicles) in the ovaries, and with symptoms such as delayed onset of puberty, irregular menstrual cycles, and excess bodily hair.Autism is a condition characterized by difficulties in social interaction and communication alongside unusually narrow interests, a strong preference for predictability, and difficulties adjusting to unexpected change. Some autistic people also have learning difficulties and delayed language, and many have sensory hyper-sensitivity. The signs of autism are evident in childhood even if the diagnosis is not made until later, and occurs in about 1% of the population.The research team previously published work in 2015 which showed that before they are born, autistic children have elevated levels of ‘sex steroid’ hormones (including testosterone) which ‘ masculinize’ the baby’s body and brain. The discovery that prenatal sex steroid hormones are involved in the development of autism is one possible explanation for why autism is diagnosed more often in boys.The scientists wondered where these elevated sex steroid hormones were coming from, one possible source being the mother. If she had higher levels of testosterone than usual, as is the case in women with PCOS, then some of the hormone might cross the placenta during pregnancy, exposing her unborn baby to more of this hormone, and changing the baby’s brain development.Using anonymous data from a large database of GP health records, the study looked at 8,588 women with PCOS and their first-born children, compared to a group of 41,127 women without PCOS. The team found that, even after taking into account other factors (like maternal mental health problems or complications during pregnancy), women with PCOS had a 2.3% chance of having an autistic child, compared with the 1.7% chance for mothers without PCOS.The team stressed that the likelihood of having an autistic child is still very low, even among women with PCOS – but finding this link provides an important clue in understanding one of the multiple causal factors in autism.Related StoriesEyes hold clues to effective treatment of severe autism, study showsAtypical eating behaviors may indicate autismHigh levels of acid in processed foods could affect fetus’ developing brainThe team presented their findings at the International Meeting for Autism Research in 2016, and their findings were replicated in a Swedish study in the same year, adding to the reliability of the result.The team also conducted two other studies using the same data and found that autistic women were more likely to have PCOS, and women with PCOS were more likely to have autism themselves. This strongly suggests that these two conditions are linked, probably because they both share elevated sex steroid hormone levels.Adriana Cherskov, the Master’s student who analyzed the data, and who is now studying medicine in the US, said: “This is an important piece of new evidence for the theory that autism is not only caused by genes but also by prenatal sex steroid hormones such as testosterone.”Professor Simon Baron-Cohen, Director of the Autism Research Centre, who supervised the research, said: “This new research is helping us understand the effects of testosterone on the developing fetal brain, and on the child’s later behaviour and mind. These hormonal effects are not necessarily independent of genetic factors, as a mother or her baby may have higher levels of the hormone for genetic reasons, and testosterone can affect how genes function.”Dr Carrie Allison who co-supervised the research, said: “We need to think about the practical steps we can put in place to support women with PCOS as they go through their pregnancies. The likelihood is statistically significant but nevertheless still small, in that most women with PCOS won’t have a child with autism, but we want to be transparent with this new information.”Dr Rupert Payne from the University of Bristol Centre for Academic Primary Care, a GP and the expert on the team in using GP health record data for this type of research, said: “Autism can have a significant impact on a person’s wellbeing, and on their parents, and many autistic people have significant health, social care and educational special needs. This is an important step in trying to understand what causes autism. It is also an excellent example of the value of using anonymous routine healthcare data to answer vital medical research questions.” Source:https://www.cam.ac.uklast_img read more


Its Already on File How Administrative Records Can Help Assess Mobility

Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe How Two Economists Got Direct Access to IRS Tax Records The motto of the U.S. Census Bureau, the government’s de facto statistical agency, is “Measuring America—People, Places, and Our Economy.” As assistant director  for research and methodology at the Census Bureau, Ron Jarmin tries not only to improve how those measurements are done but also how the outside research community can make use of the data once they’ve been collected.The rest of the government also collects vast amounts of data on Americans in the course of doing its job. But officials at the so-called mission agencies—labor, justice, treasury, education, health, housing, and so on—have historically paid relatively little attention to how researchers outside the government might be able to use their data.That could be changing, however. A 14 February memo from Sylvia Burwell, then the director of the White House’s Office of Management and Budget (OMB), urges agencies to make better use of the massive amounts of economic and demographic data they routinely collect—so long as their actions do not jeopardize privacy or undermine the confidentiality of the records themselves. U.S. researchers who use government data hope that it’s the first step toward one-stop shopping for these so-called administrative records. The IGE: Anatomy of a Mobility Score Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The new initiative is part of the administration’s broader effort to make the government work better and smarter. Specifically, officials hope the additional number crunching will allow them to better evaluate existing programs, address new challenges, and save money by reducing the need to collect data already in some other government file. OMB plans to help agencies get over the hump by highlighting successful practices across the government and providing model agreements to foster collaboration among departments.The initiative also coincides with a new push to increase outside access to the government’s social and economic data.  The Council of Professional Associations on Federal Statistics, a coalition of organizations that rely on federal statistics, has funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for a survey of how agencies now manage administrative records, says Kitty Smith, the council’s executive director who for many years led the Economic Research Service, the chief statistical agency within the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The next step will be to ask scientists to identify the most valuable agency data sets, followed by discussions on what it would take to make them available. The OMB memo could grease the skids for such cooperative activities, Smith adds.The OMB memo focuses on what it calls nonpublic administrative records. That includes everything from income and earnings data submitted to the Internal Revenue Service and the Social Security Administration to what individuals provide when they apply for housing, nutrition, education, agriculture, and any number of federal assistance programs.Most of that information is collected under strict rules designed to protect the privacy of any named individuals or companies and to ensure that the records themselves remain off-limits to anyone without the proper security clearance. And Burwell, who last month was nominated to lead the Department of Health and Human Services, emphasizes the importance of “fully respecting privacy and protecting confidentiality” of those records.The need to balance “the legal prohibitions and the opportunities” of working with administrative records is a long-running issue for federal agencies, says a senior OMB official, who agreed to talk with ScienceInsider on background. Statistical agencies have had much more experience in knowing where to draw the line, the official notes, citing as an example the cautious process the Census Bureau followed more than 2 decades ago in creating a network of secure data centers, where outsiders can access sensitive data under tight supervision.The first center was opened within the bureau’s headquarters in Suitland, Maryland, the official explains, the second at the agency’s regional center in Boston. Eventually came a university-based center, and now there are more than a dozen operating around the country. “The point is that it was taken one step at a time,” the official says. “And so far everybody is very pleased with their success.”The new directive assumes that agencies will take a similarly cautious approach when they undertake statistical analyses of their existing records. “The boon of technology is that we can do things we could never do before, like record matching and record linkages,” the OMB official says. “But the bane is that the same technology we use to good effect could be used by those of less goodwill, to do harm, or at least do the kinds of things that were not the intention of those who collected this information.”“Our compact with the American people says that we will maintain the confidentiality of the information,” the OMB official emphasizes. “And the agencies are responsible for making sure that happens. It’s not just a legal framework, it’s a bond we have with the public.”Social science researchers say they take that bond seriously, and live in constant fear that there might be a breach. “Researchers would always like less restrictive access,” says Miles Corak, an economist at the University of Ottawa who has helped develop data sets on social mobility while working for Statistics Canada. “But you have to appreciate that if there’s just one mistake, or one time that data are disclosed, it ruins it for everybody, forever. So you can understand why the government is so risk averse.”U.S. social scientists say the biggest threat to expanded use of administrative records could come not from the agencies that manage them but from Congress. Some legislators think that the government is already collecting too much information, they note. Researchers worry that politicians might overreact to any move toward making more linkages by attempting to ban existing access, including those arrangements that have led to a better understanding of social phenomena.Such an outcome “would be about as far away from evidence-based policy as you can get,” says Tim Smeeding, an economist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. “It’s like saying, ‘Let’s just hide the evidence and not give people access to it.’ That makes no sense to me.”*Correction, 4 June, 10:40 a.m.: Timothy Smeeding was incorrectly identified as a sociologist in an earlier version of the story.See also:The science of inequality Email What Surveys Have Told Us About U.S. Social Mobility Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country read more


Sole physicist in Congress announces support for Iran deal

first_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe The congressman holds a physics Ph.D. from Harvard University and spent more than 2 decades as a particle accelerator designer at Fermilab, a DOE national laboratory in Batavia, Illinois. Because of his training and experience, Foster emphasized that he felt “a special responsibility” in reviewing the proposed agreement, especially concerning its more technical aspects such as the transformation of Iran’s Arak reactor to render it incapable of producing large amounts of weapons-grade plutonium.Foster noted that his physics background and experience managing technical projects had helped him analyze whether the deal would successfully block the multiple paths the Iranians might take to create a nuclear weapon. “I went into this putting myself in the mindset of a nuclear proliferator in Iran and saying, ‘What if I try that? If we find this is impossible or blocked by the agreement, what are the alternatives?’ So you go through these ‘what if’ questions, making sure we have all the leaks plugged,” he said.At the press conference, the congressman was flanked by U.S. Secretary of Energy Ernest Moniz, one of the key negotiators of the agreement, and Richard Garwin, a physicist who helped develop the first hydrogen bomb. Garwin recently co-wrote a letter to President Barack Obama supporting the agreement along with 28 prominent scientists and engineers, including Rush Holt, who signed as an individual but is also the chief executive officer of AAAS (publisher of ScienceInsider).“I am here today to add my name to that list of 29 scientists and engineers who have endorsed the deal and the growing number of members of Congress who will be voting in favor of it,” Foster said.Although a majority of both houses of Congress—which are controlled by Republicans—are expected to support a measure opposing the deal, analysts predict it will survive. That is because opponents in Congress have not mustered enough support to override a presidential veto, which requires two-thirds of the votes in each body. (President Obama has signaled that he would veto such a measure if it reached his desk.) It is still not clear, however, whether the Senate will actually vote on an Iran bill; 42 Democrats have said they support the deal, potentially denying opponents in the Senate the 60 votes needed to end debate and bring the issue to a vote. Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Countrycenter_img As U.S. lawmakers today begin debating the agreement the United States and five other nations have reached with Iran to limit its nuclear weapons program, the only physicist serving in Congress has announced he will support the deal.“After carefully weighing all the options and possible outcomes, I do believe that voting for this deal will make it less likely that Iran will develop nuclear weapons,” Representative Bill Foster (D–IL) said yesterday at a Washington, D.C., press conference. “And voting against this deal, with no better options in sight, makes the potential for Iran to develop a nuclear weapon more likely.”Whether Iran ultimately obtains a nuclear weapon is as much a matter of physics as it is of politics, Foster suggested at Tuesday’s announcement. That’s why he has been analyzing the science underpinning the deal—in addition to the politics—since the proposed agreement was announced this past July. Now, after 15 “lengthy” briefings with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) scientists and other technical experts, Foster says his support “is determined not just by trust, but by science.” Emaillast_img read more


Cosmic cacophony of colliding black holes continues

first_img Cosmic cacophony of colliding black holes continues By Adrian ChoDec. 3, 2018 , 5:45 PM SXS, the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes project center_img Infinitesimal ripples in space called gravitational waves have revealed four more instances in which two massive black holes have spiraled into each other and merged with mind-bending violence. Spied between 30 November 2016 and 25 August 2017, the events bring the total number of black hole mergers to 10, report physicists with the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the Virgo gravitational wave detector. With help from Virgo’s detector in Pisa, Italy, LIGO’s twin detectors—in Livingston, Louisiana, and Hanford, Washington—are seeing such mergers about once every 15 days of observations, physicists report today at a workshop at the University of Maryland in College Park.Gravitational waves are mind-bogglingly small distortions of space-time itself that can be set off when two massive objects whirl into each other. LIGO researchers electrified the world in February 2016 when they reported the first observation of such waves, which emanated from two black holes 29 and 36 times as massive as the sun, spiraling together. Twenty months later, LIGO and Virgo wowed the world again when they reported the merger of two much smaller neutron stars. For astronomers, that collision was even more of a gold mine because it produced a gamma ray burst and other electromagnetic signals that, for example, revealed the birth of copious heavy nuclei. (Because they involve no matter, black hole mergers produce only invisible gravitational waves.) Just over a year ago, the developers of LIGO shared the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics. Virgo came on in 2017 and has also seen three of 11 total sources, helping pinpoint their locations on the sky.The latest observations set some new records. In particular, a merger spotted on 29 July 2017 was a staggering 9 billion light-years from Earth, and it involved black holes 50 and 34 times as massive as the sun. Physicists still aren’t sure how such big stellar mass black holes form or how they pair. For example, scientists don’t know whether they start out as pairs of stars that collapse into their own black holes or instead start as individual black holes that somehow latch onto each other. The details from a bigger sample of such events could help sort out the correct models. LIGO and Virgo are currently down for maintenance and tuning, and they should resume their searching early next year.last_img read more


This alligatorlike fish sucks—at lightning speeds

first_img With a long, broad snout filled to the brim with flesh-piercing teeth, the alligator gar, a 3-meter-long freshwater fish, is easy to mistake for its reptilian namesake. What’s less obvious is that this toothy creature has been patrolling the bayous and rivers of North America virtually unchanged for tens of millions of years. Now, paleontologists have taken advantage of that long history to gain insights into how its ancient relatives might have snapped, sucked, and engulfed their food.First, researchers used high-speed cameras to record 17 young alligator gar feeding in the lab and study the mechanics of their ferocious bite. The team also used x-ray scans of the fish’s head (above) to create a 3D model of its skull that was used to visualize the movements of the jaw bones during feeding.The researchers assumed their study would be an open-and-shut case—the alligator gar was thought to capture prey simply by slamming its jaws shut. But they found something surprising: The gar also creates powerful suction at lightning speed (42 milliseconds) with tightly choreographed movements of bones in its skull and shoulder, according to research posted last week on the bioRxiv preprint server. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country This alligatorlike fish sucks—at lightning speedscenter_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Alex FoxMar. 6, 2019 , 5:45 PM Those complex skull and jaw movements suggest a new feeding mechanism not only for the prehistoric-looking gar, but also its genuinely prehistoric relatives, scientists say. This can help fish biologists figure out how and what the modern gar eats—and paleontologists imagine how similar extinct species might have fed. What’s more, this deeper understanding of how a living fossil moves could help reconstruct similar motions in ancient species—and allow computers to reanimate actual fossil bones.last_img read more


This ancient bird sported a ginormous toe

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Email Zhongda Zhang/Current Biology Imagine having a toe as long as your shin. That’s essentially what researchers have found in a bird foot trapped in amber for nearly 100 million years. The appendage features an extremely long third toe never before seen in birds.Amber dealers suspected the fossil foot, originally found in the Hukawng Valley of Myanmar in 2014, belonged to a lizard, which are known for their long toes. But lizards have five toes, suggesting the sample belonged to a bird instead.In the new study, researchers used detailed x-ray scans to create a 3D model of the foot. They then compared it with the feet of more than 80 modern and ancient birds. The fossil’s third toe, which measures nearly 10 millimeters, is 20% longer than its lower leg and more than 40% longer than its second toe, the team reports today in Current Biology. No other bird—living or extinct—sports such an appendage. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) This ancient bird sported a ginormous toe By Sabine GalvisJul. 11, 2019 , 11:00 AM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country It’s unclear what the bird—which the researchers have christened Elektorornis chenguangi (seen in this artist’s conception)—used the toe for. (Elektorornis means “amber bird,” and the second half of the name is a nod to the discoverer of the fossil, Chen Guang.) Lengthy toes are a common feature of tree-dwelling animals like squirrels and monkeys because they improve branch grip. Researchers speculate that the unusual adaptation may have been used to dig food out of tree trunks. Whatever the reason, it wasn’t a feature that caught on. Elektorornis vanished with the dinosaurs 66 million years ago, leaving no modern descendants.last_img read more


Anything faster than a brisk walk on this martian moon could send

first_img Walk, don’t run, on the martian moon Phobos. A new study finds that traveling faster than about 5 kilometers per hour on some regions of the Red Planet’s largest satellite could shoot you straight off into space.Phobos (pictured) is an odd duck among our solar system’s moons. It’s tiny (a fraction of a percent the size of our own moon) and is shaped like a potato; that weird shape draws gravity to different places, depending on where you are.All these features make Phobos a challenge to travel on, researchers report in Advances in Space Research. In some places, moving any faster than 5 kilometers per hour would be enough to free you from the moon’s meager gravitational pull, sending you off into space where you’d likely be captured by Mars’s gravity and end up orbiting the Red Planet. The fastest you could travel anywhere on Phobos would be about 36 kilometers per hour, or a little faster than a golf cart, the team finds. Anything faster than a brisk walk on this martian moon could send you spinning off into space Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country The findings could pose problems for planned missions to Phobos. Several Russian missions have already failed to reach the moon, though one attained martian orbit in the late 1980s before contact was lost. A Japanese landing mission slated for the early 2020s will involve observing the moon and extracting samples.The authors say traveling on the moon will have to happen in slow motion in some places in order to keep contact with the surface. Meanwhile, anything driving on the surface or hovering nearby may need autonomous navigation and control systems to adapt to the wonky spin rate and Phobos’s gravity, to avoid being lost in space. By Joshua Rapp LearnNov. 15, 2018 , 3:25 PM University of Arizona/JPL-Caltech/NASA Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwelast_img read more


Crashout Brexit looms larger for scientists after deal rejected

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May’s compromise Brexit deal was rejected by Parliament. Frank Augstein/AP Photo Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Crash-out Brexit looms larger for scientists after deal rejected By Erik StokstadJan. 16, 2019 , 2:55 PMcenter_img Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Email A historic defeat for U.K. Prime Minister Theresa May has raised the odds that the United Kingdom will crash out of the European Union in March, a prospect that scientists dread for its potential for disruption to research collaborations and the economy. On 15 January, Parliament roundly rejected May’s deal with the European Union, which lays out the terms for an orderly withdrawal. What happens next is unknown.“Yesterday’s unprecedented vote makes the prospect of leaving the EU without a deal even more likely,” said Venki Ramakrishnan, president of the Royal Society in London, in a statement. “A no-deal Brexit would be a disaster for British science and innovation and I urge our elected representatives to put the interests of the country first and get a new plan to prevent this catastrophic outcome.”After a 2016 referendum, in which a majority of 51.9% voted to leave Europe, May invoked Article 50 of the European Union’s Treaty of Lisbon. This action set 29 March as the date of departure. In November 2018, May’s negotiators reached an agreement with the European Union over the terms of the departure, spelling out the United Kingdom’s remaining financial obligations to the European Union and specifying a 2-year period to smooth the transition. As expected, Parliament has rejected this deal. Proponents of Brexit, for example, say the deal keeps too many ties to the European Union. May must return to Parliament within 3 days to present an alternative. But given the European Union’s negotiating stance, there is little she can do to make the deal more palatable to its opponents. With Parliament deadlocked, some observers say a second referendum is needed to allow the people to vote on the deal and additional options. Others suggest a general election should be called. If nothing happens, the United Kingdom will by default leave without a deal.The consequences for the nation, including scientists, could be severe. The economy is predicted to take a hit and could remain hindered for years—with possible ramifications for funding of science. Without adequate preparations at the border, imports could slow to a crawl. Some scientists fear this could lead to shortages of crucial reagents or other laboratory supplies.In the event of a no-deal exit, the ability of U.K. researchers to apply for EU funding would immediately cease, and collaborations on international clinical trials and other research projects could also be affected.last_img read more


Dominican Republic Tourist Deaths Prompt Questions

first_imgDuring the last week of May, a Black couple was found dead in their hotel room. Maryland couple Cynthia Ann Day, 49, and her fiance Nathaniel Edward Holmes, 63, were staying at the Baha Principe hotel in Playa Nueva Romana. Their bodies were discovered on May 30, the same day they were to fly back to the United States. On Sunday, the Dominican Republic National Police determined that the couple died from respiratory failure and pulmonary edema caused by excess fluid in their lungs. Days later, it still remained unclear what may have caused their condition.Day and Holmes’ deaths become even more suspicious after it was learned that another tourist died under mysterious circumstances at the same hotel.Just five days before Day and Holmes’ bodies were found, a Pennsylvania woman collapsed and died at the Baha Principe hotel. Miranda Schaup-Werner, 41, checked in with her husband, Dan Werner, on May 25, the same day as the Maryland couple. Reports say after she enjoyed a drink at a minibar, she suddenly collapsed in her hotel room.“At one point, she was sitting there happily smiling and taking pictures and the next moment she was in acute pain and called out for Dan and she collapsed,” family spokesperson Jay McDonald said.Two months earlier, a Black couple from New York went missing in the Dominican Republic. Orlando Moore, 43, and his girlfriend, Portia Ravenelle, 51, had checked out of their hotel in Samana but never made it to their flight back to the United States back in March. For two weeks, photos of the couple enjoying their vacation began to circulate in the media as family and friends worried over their whereabouts. It was later discovered that the pair died after their car plunged off a cliff as they made their way to the airport. Ravenelle was found unconscious on the side of the road and later died at a local hospital. Moore’s body was found at sea. Jamaican Republican Who Is Running Against AOC Supported Her A Year Ago SEE ALSO:Attorneys For The Black Cop Who Shot A White Woman Asks For No Prison TimeBotham Jean’s Mother Breaks Silence On Amber Guyger’s 911 Call Group Chat: Yall wanna go to the Dominican Republic? Me: pic.twitter.com/cwVFcvKkGO— DJ Cuisine (@ncludacris) June 5, 2019 Cynthia Ann Day Nathaniel Edward Holmes , Dominican Republic , Orlando Moore , Portia Ravenelle According to the World Health Organization, the Dominican Republic ranked fifth in road deaths per capita in 2016.In a now viral Facebook post, a Delaware woman described being kidnapped and severely beaten at her hotel while on a trip to Punta Cana in January. Tammy Lawrence-Daley wrote in her post that an employee of the Majestic Elegance resort subjected her to a violent ordeal that lasted for eight hours. Daley also claimed that the man thought she was dead and tried to dispose of her in a hole.“This man thought he killed me, but he failed. He is still out there, a predator, waiting for his next victim. Only the next woman may not be so fortunate. Please, please do not walk alone. These attacks are happening too frequently and the criminals are not being prosecuted even though evidence is found,” Daley wrote.Daley, who said she still suffers from several issues, including nerve damage, also mentioned that the hotel denied that any of its employees were involved.The U.S. State Department issued a travel advisory for the Dominican Republic in April for crime before updating it in May to rank the nation a level 2 travel advisory for crime, which warns travelers to exercise increased caution. According to USA Today, areas popular with tourists, such as Punta Cana, the resort town on the island’s eastern shoreline where Lawrence-Daley said she was attacked, and Playa Nueva Romano, the resort on the southern shoreline where Holmes and Day vacationed, are actually thought to be safer. Just six months into the year, there have already been at least five deaths and at least one attempted murder of American tourists in the Dominican Republic, which has been a popular vacation spot for years. With two dead Black couples and three suspicious deaths at the same hotel within weeks of one another, many people are wondering what exactly is going on in the Dominican Republic?center_img Morehouse Students Take To Social Media And Claim Sexual Harassment Complaints Were Ignored White Tears! Former Meteorologist Files Lawsuit Claiming He Was Fired Because Of Diversity Derion Vence, Maleah Davis, Brittany Bowens A Disturbing Timeline Of 4-Year-Old Maleah Davis Going Missing After Being Left With Her Stepfather More By Megan Simslast_img read more


Jackson State University Student Creates LeadFiltering Straw

first_imgFor Jackson State University graduate student LaMonté Pierce what started out as a class project focused on addressing an issue faced by communities in Mississippi led to the creation of a product designed to combat lead poisoning in water, WJTV reported. House Judiciary Committee Holds Hearing On American Slavery Reparations Black Twitter Is Split On Reparations After Contentious House Hearing The JSU graduate student has received impressive offers from big retailers like Walmart which offered to sell CleanStraww in nearly 4,000 stores. https://t.co/0R8Zxwu4Tj— Lanaya Lewis (@LanayaLewis) June 20, 2019center_img Pierce and other students that he collaborated with decided to use the assignment as an avenue to address water contamination impacting the City of Jackson. They designed a straw that could be used to filter water. Pierce and his classmate Andrew Willis decided to go beyond the project and continue to do research and testing to turn the straw into a product that would be a catalyst in addressing water contamination in communities across the globe. Pierce’s efforts led to the creation of Cleanstraww. The straws are made of non-toxic materials and has a three-step filtering process which divides sediment and particles from water. He utilized a 3-D printer for the creation of the straw.“I saw somewhere they were drinking out of toilets, they were drinking from the river, different things like that. They use simple filters that you can find in everyday filters, but the thing was they did not filter out lead. If we can filter out lead, we can pretty much filter out anything,” he told the news outlet. “Take the responsibility of clean water directly out of the government, state and city officials hands and put it in the hands of the consumers. If you want clean water, here you go.” Several national retailers have expressed interest in selling his product, including Walmart. Pierce hopes that he can find investors for his product to grow his business and create more jobs in Mississippi.Products like Cleanstraww are needed. According to CBS News, lead in America’s water systems has become a growing national crisis.SEE ALSO:Calls For Student Safety Grow As San Francisco Schools Test Water For LeadBlack Entrepreneur Receives $1 Million Investment From Jay-Z’s Venture Capital Fund Cleanstraww , entrepreneur , Jackson State University , LaMonté Pierce , lead water , water , water crisis , Water Filterlast_img read more


Key EPA science advisers call on agency to revive an expert soot

first_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Originally published by E&E NewsTwo of acting Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) chief Andrew Wheeler’s appointees to a prominent advisory committee are pushing back against his recent decision to disband an auxiliary panel involved in a closely watched review of airborne particulate standards.EPA “should immediately” reconstitute the particulate matter panel, Dr. Mark Frampton, a retired University of Rochester, New York, pulmonologist, wrote in comments made public yesterday. The panel “should be retained to enable more thorough review” of a draft EPA roundup of scientific research on the health and environmental effects of particulate matter exposure, said Tim Lewis of the Army Corps of Engineers in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Key EPA science advisers call on agency to revive an expert soot panel it just killed Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Sean Reilly, E&E NewsDec. 11, 2018 , 3:00 PM Read more… Email Andrew Wheeler, acting administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Cliff Owen/AP photo Wheeler named both men to the Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) in October, around the same time that he fired the approximately 24-member review panel, which was supposed to help the committee with added know-how during its legally required review of the standards.Also urging its revival is Jim Boylan, a senior manager at the Georgia Environmental Protection Division, appointed to the committee last fall by then-EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. The panel would furnish “additional insight and expertise to allow for a more thorough and in-depth review of the relevant science and policy documents,” Boylan wrote.All of their input is included in CASAC’s preliminary written response to the draft roundup, which will be the subject of a two-day meeting starting tomorrow in a hotel just outside Washington. EPA spokesman John Konkus and other agency press aides did not reply to an email seeking comment. Wheeler has given no explanation for disbanding the panel, apart from saying the decision to concentrate authority with CASAC was consistent with the Clean Air Act and the committee’s charter.By law, the seven-member CASAC provides outside expertise to EPA during assessments of the air quality standards for particulate matter, ozone and four other pollutants. All of its current members have been appointed under President Donald Trump’s administration; the panel is now supposed to conduct the appraisals of the particulate matter and ozone limits under new, streamlined procedures laid out by Pruitt this spring.The review of the ozone standard, kick-started in June, is supposed to conclude by October 2020. By EPA norms, that’s an exceptionally tight timetable with no recent precedent. The review of the particulate matter thresholds, once expected to end early in the next decade, is now supposed to also wrap up in late 2020, just before the end of Trump’s current term.Apart from Frampton, none of the seven CASAC members has a deep background in air pollution research. During a teleconference last month related to the ozone standard assessment, both Lewis and Frampton similarly urged creation of an auxiliary review panel, while Boylan put a higher priority on doing a good job than on meeting the October 2020 deadline.But the review of the particulate matter standards is particularly fraught. So-called fine particulates are linked to a wide spectrum of heart and lung problems that include a heightened risk of premature death.The draft research roundup, spanning almost 1,900 pages and formally known as an integrated science assessment (ISA), cites evidence that the existing limits on fine particulate exposure are too weak to adequately protect public health. Business groups, however, are worried about the added compliance costs that would likely follow any decision to tighten the existing limits. Moreover, 15 former members of the disbanded particulate matter review panel yesterday slammed EPA’s fast-track game plan for the review and hinted that a legal challenge could be in the offing (Greenwire, Dec. 10).”We remind CASAC and EPA, and CASAC should remind EPA, that the courts have recognized the importance of CASAC’s role and the need for adequate scientific review time,” they wrote in the letter to Tony Cox, the committee’s chairman.In an email, Cox yesterday called the scheduling and process questions “well worth considering,” but said they are not the committee’s primary responsibility. While Cox has previously said he has not reached any conclusion on whether the fine particulate standards should be changed, his past work for industry has left some scientists and environmental groups skeptical of his evenhandedness. In his comments on the draft research roundup, Cox wrote that he wanted more evidence, saying EPA should also provide “quantitative estimates” for “the amount of human health harm preventable by reducing PM exposures.”The clashing viewpoints enveloping the issue will be on full display tomorrow, with more than 25 speakers scheduled to address the committee. Many have already made written submissions of what they plan to say. Among them is Stewart Holm, chief scientist for the American Forest and Paper Association, who cited another study that he said “illuminates the complexity and uncertainty” surrounding the research over fine particulates’ health effects. “Until this uncertainty is addressed, it is possible that a substantial portion of the conclusions reached by the ISA regarding adverse health effects may be unreliable,” Holm wrote in recommending that the existing standards be left in place.They will also include Daniel Costa, a cardiopulmonary physiologist who headed EPA’s air quality research program from 2008 until early this year, according to his advance written testimony. Recalling how his father died in 1998 from heart arrhythmia, Costa acknowledged that he probably could not definitively pin the death on exposure to particulate pollution from a nearby coal-fired power plant operating at the time in the coastal Massachusetts area.But, he added in the statement, “Do I believe that the emissions of the power plant were responsible? You’re damn right I do!”Reprinted from Greenwire with permission from E&E News. Copyright 2018. E&E provides essential news for energy and environment professionals at www.eenews.net.Related story: Q&A: This air pollution expert advised EPA for a decade. Now, he’s a leading criticlast_img read more


Sweet corn days are here again

first_imgPhoto by Toni GibbonsThree generations of the Hatch family continue the tradition of growing, harvesting and selling sweet corn that Wes Hatch started in the 1980s at the Sunrise Farms in Taylor. Hatch family pictured here are (left to right) Wes, Konner, Waylon, Logan and Wyatt. By Toni Gibbons       “We do it all by hand,” said Wes Hatch, owner of Sunrise Farms in Taylor, as he shared the secret behind growing the best sweet corn. “We hand thin it, handSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad Sweet corn days are here againcenter_img August 21, 2018last_img


January designated as Human Trafficking Awareness month

first_imgJanuary designated as Human Trafficking Awareness month December 18, 2018 By Toni Gibbons       The Navajo County Board of Supervisors unanimously proclaimed January 2019 as “National Slavery and Human Trafficking Awareness Month” after a presentation by Dylan Baca, the Navajo County Commissioner for the Governor’sSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Adlast_img


No injuries in hotel fire

first_img By Linda Kor       At 4 p.m. on Friday, Jan. 18, the Holbrook Volunteer Fire Department responded to a reported fire at the Best Western Arizonian Inn, located at 2508 Navajo Blvd. According to ChiefSubscribe or log in to read the rest of this content. Bottom Ad No injuries in hotel fire February 1, 2019last_img


Research groups attend HHS listening session on fetal tissue research amid funding

first_img Science advocates who attended a “listening session” on the use of fetal tissue in medical research held today by senior officials at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in Washington, D.C., say they are optimistic that they were listened to and heard. But many researchers remain concerned about reports that President Donald Trump’s administration is considering withdrawing funding for such studies, which are fiercely opposed by antiabortion advocates. “It was a very good conversation. It was not a ‘check the box’ meeting,” says Kevin Wilson, director of public policy and media relations for the American Society for Cell Biology in Bethesda, Maryland.“It was a wonderful opportunity to talk about the science,” adds Jennifer Zeitzer, director of public affairs at the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), also in Bethesda. Zeitzer was accompanied by FASEB board member Patricia Morris, a reproductive biologist at The Rockefeller University in New York City. By Meredith WadmanNov. 16, 2018 , 5:50 PM The meeting participants also included a representative from the Society for Neuroscience in Washington, D.C. Martin Pera, a human embryonic stem cell expert at The Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor, Maine, attended via Skype on behalf of the International Society for Stem Cell Research, based in Skokie, Illinois. (Travel delays prevented him from attending in person.)The off-the-record, invitation-only meeting was part of a new “review” of U.S.-funded research that involves human fetal tissue, derived from elective abortions, that would otherwise be discarded. The use of such tissue is legal under a 1993 federal law. The science advocates who attended today’s meeting left HHS officials with packets of information describing the tissue’s importance in research, from studies of how the Zika virus damages fetuses to probes of HIV biology and tests of drugs against it.Groups opposed to abortion have long opposed the use of the tissue, and in September they wrote letters to HHS Secretary Alex Azar and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Scott Gottlieb urging them to defund the research. The same month, HHS announced it was launching the review, and FDA said it was canceling a contract for supplying fetal tissue to the agency.The review is being spearheaded by Brett Giroir, a physician-scientist who is assistant secretary for health, and Paula Stannard, senior counselor to Azar; both were at today’s meeting. Also present in the HHS conference room were Lawrence Tabak, principal deputy director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), which funded an estimated $103 million in projects using human fetal tissue this year; and Lowell Schiller, senior counselor to Gottlieb.Fetal tissue research backers and opponents alike are watching the review process closely. Today’s meeting was one of several “listening sessions” with stakeholders that HHS has said will include abortion rights groups and ethicists, as well as academic institutions.Abortion opponents are hoping that the end result is a shutdown of U.S. funding for research using the tissue. David Prentice, research director at the Charlotte Lozier Institute in Arlington, Virginia, which opposes human fetal tissue research, applauds the review as “timely and welcome. … It’s good to see this in-depth examination of the science, bioethics, modern alternatives, and options. My hope is for those funds to go to better science.”Lawrence Goldstein, a neuroscientist at the University of California, San Diego, who depends on human fetal tissue for his work studying Alzheimer’s disease, says he is reserving judgment on the outcome of the process. “There’s nothing wrong with review. That’s a good thing,” he says. “But I’m watchfully waiting to see whether they can do this in an objective way.”Some critics doubt the review will reach that objective result.“Azar has continually painted himself as a no-nonsense technocrat, yet he continually kowtows to antiabortion groups while ignoring the scientific and medical communities,” says Mary Alice Carter, director of Equity Forward, a New York City–based nonprofit that monitors the activity of antiabortion groups and supports human fetal tissue research.In a related development, Politico reported today that Giroir sent a letter to Representative Mark Meadows (R–NC), who opposes abortion, assuring him that HHS is “fully committed to prioritizing, expanding, and accelerating efforts to develop and implement the use of … alternatives” to fetal tissue from elective abortions.If HHS did decide to halt funding for human fetal tissue research, it is unclear whether the ban would apply to research grants that agencies have already awarded. Eight years ago, after a federal judge ruled that federally funded human embryonic stem cell research was illegal, in-house NIH projects were halted for 19 days, as were as reviews of new extramural proposals and pending grant payments. But NIH funds that had already been disbursed to extramural researchers were not affected.And 4 years ago, when the federal government paused a controversial type of influenza research known as “gain of function” experiments, officials halted new grants but asked only for a “voluntary pause” on ongoing projects.With reporting by Jocelyn Kaiser. Fetal brain cells called astrocytes are used in studies on Alzheimer’s disease. Riccardo Cassiani-Ingoni/Science Source Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwecenter_img Research groups attend HHS ‘listening session’ on fetal tissue research amid funding fears Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! 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Hong Kong residents with UK passports seek right to live in Britain

first_img Hong Kong police “trapped in the middle” by polarising extradition bill Advertising Britain occupied Hong Kong Island in 1841, establishing a colony there and obtaining a 99-year lease there in 1898.Hong Kong returned to Chinese rule in 1997 and has since been governed under a “one country, two systems” formula that allows it freedoms not enjoyed on the mainland, including freedom to protest and a much-cherished independent judiciary.British Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt has said Britain will stand by the so-called Sino-British Joint Declaration of 1984, and has urged China to do the same in handling the crisis.China has urged Britain not to interfere in Hong Kong affairs, and in 2017 said the declaration was a historical document with no practical significance.“If they pass the extradition law, and then all the Hong Kong citizens including BNO holders will be frightened by that,” Ling said. “In my point of view, there is no more on country, two systems.” Hong Kong citizen and British National (Overseas) passport-holder Samson Ling poses for a photograph in London, June 27, 2019. REUTERS/Peter NichollsSamson Ling may have a British passport, but it offers him no route out of Hong Kong to a life in London as protests grow against an extradition bill that many see as an example of growing Chinese influence in the financial hub. Best Of Express After Masood Azhar blacklisting, more isolation for Pakistan Related News Post Comment(s) Fate of 24 arrested Hong Kong protesters hangs in balance as anger turns on police center_img Millions of people have taken to the streets of Hong Kong, a former British colony, in recent weeks to rally against a bill that would allow people to be sent to mainland China for trial in courts controlled by the Communist Party.With many young people looking for routes out of Hong Kong, some campaigners say Britain should change the status of the British National (Overseas) passport, a category created after Britain returned Hong Kong to Chinese rule in 1997.Though BNO passports are British passports that allow a holder to visit the UK for 6 months, they do not come with an automatic right to live or work in the United Kingdom. “We are asking for our rights as passport holders,” Ling, 59, a BN(O) passport holder who is in London to lobby the British government on the issue, told Reuters. “The UK has left all the BNO passport holders behind, and left the Hong Kongers to stay in Hong Kong.”Ling said such passport holders should be granted the right of abode or working visas, and that he would like to move to Britain with his family. But Britain’s interior ministey said it had no plans to change the system.“We continue to believe that the best solution for Hong Kong, and the BN(O) passport holders that live there, is full respect for the rights and freedoms guaranteed in the Sino-British Joint Declaration,” a government spokesman said.“We have no plans to amend the law in regards to BN(O) status.” Advertising By Reuters |London | Published: June 28, 2019 8:47:44 pm Karnataka trust vote today: Speaker’s call on resignations, says SC, but gives rebel MLAs a shield Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach Fresh wave of protests as Hong Kong ignores deadline to scrap extradition bill last_img read more


International Court of Justice to decide Kulbhushan Jadhavs fate today

first_imgkulbhushan jadhav, Kulbhushan kjadhav verdict, ICJ kulbhushan Jadhav verdict, icj, International Court of Justice, pakistan detain jadhav, pakistan military court, india news, india-pakistan ties, India Pakistan Relations, Haris Salve, Pakistan Army, Indian Navy, RAW, ISI (L-R) Indian Lawyer Harish Salve, Dr. V. D. Sharma and Deepak Mittal, Joint Secretaries, Indian Ministry of External Affairs are seen at the International Court of Justice. (Reuters)The sentencing of 49-year-old Jadhav by the Pakistani military court on charges of “espionage and terrorism” after a closed trial in April 2017 had evoked a sharp reaction in India, especially after Islamabad rejected its ICJ plea for consular access, claiming that New Delhi wants to get the information gathered by its “spy”.While Pakistan claims that its security forces arrested Jadhav from restive Balochistan province on March 3, 2016 after he reportedly entered from Iran, India maintains that Jadhav was kidnapped from Iran where he had business interests after retiring from the Navy.kulbhushan jadhav, Kulbhushan kjadhav verdict, ICJ kulbhushan Jadhav verdict, icj, International Court of Justice, pakistan detain jadhav, pakistan military court, india news, india-pakistan ties, India Pakistan Relations, Haris Salve, Pakistan Army, Indian Navy, RAW, ISI Judges are seen at the International Court of Justice during the final hearing in the Kulbhushan Jadhav case in The Hague, the Netherlands. (Reuters)India had moved the ICJ on May 8, 2017 for the “egregious violation” of the provisions of the Vienna Convention by Pakistan by repeatedly denying New Delhi consular access to Jadhav. In May that year, a 10-member bench of the ICJ, which was set up after World War II to resolve international disputes, had restrained Pakistan from executing Jadhav till adjudication of the case.Earlier this year, a public hearing took place with India and Pakistan arguing in the Court between February 18 to 21 amid heightened tension between the neighbouring countries following the Pulwama terror attack, in which 40 CRPF soldiers were killed. Pakistan-based Jaish-e-Mohammed terror group claimed the responsibility of the attack.kulbhushan jadhav, Kulbhushan kjadhav verdict, ICJ kulbhushan Jadhav verdict, icj, International Court of Justice, pakistan detain jadhav, pakistan military court, india news, india-pakistan ties, India Pakistan Relations, Haris Salve, Pakistan Army, Indian Navy, RAW, ISI (L-R) Attorney Anwar Mansoor Khan, Pakistani foreign office spokesperson Mohammad Faisal and Queen’s Counsel Khawar Qureshi at the International Court of Justice. (Reuters)In its plea, New Delhi told the court that, as a last resort, it could direct Pakistan to hold Jadhav’s trial in a “civilian court” and grant him all the legal recourse, including consular access. However, it maintained that its first plea remains that Jadhav should be released and given safe passage, and that the military court’s conviction be annulled. These options were spelt out by joint secretary Mittal at the ICJ. Kulbhushan Jadhav case LIVE updates: ICJ to hear Pakistan’s submissions today Kulbhushan Jadhav was apprehended on March 3, 2016 after he illegally crossed into Pakistan from Iran, according to Pakistani officials.Nearly five months after India urged the International Court of Justice (ICJ) to annul the death sentence handed by a Pakistani military court to former Navy officer Kulbhushan Jadhav, and order his immediate release, the top UN court will deliver its judgment today. By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Updated: July 17, 2019 12:42:41 am International Court will rule July 17 on India appeal against Pak death to Kulbhushan Jadhav Advertising Advertising Related News Judge Abdulqawi Ahmed Yusuf, President of the Court, will read out the verdict of the top international court at 3 pm (6.30 pm IST) todayin a public sitting at the Peace Palace in The Hague.A team comprising lawyer Harish Salve, who was representing India in the case, and Ministry of External Affairs Joint Secretary (Pakistan, Afghanistan and Iran), Deepak Mittal are expected to be in the Netherlands for the judgment.Last week, Pakistan Foreign Office (FO) spokesperson Muhammad Faisal had said that his country cannot “prejudge” the decision of the ICJ in the Jadhav’s case. “We cannot prejudge the judgment,” he was quoted as saying by PTI. He, however, said that Pakistan has fully contested the case before the ICJ. Explained: Kulbhushan Jadhav case file Kulbhushan Jadhav case: India calls for civilian court trial 5 Comment(s)last_img read more